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Full text of "Announcements"

A 

C 
T 

S 



SSOCIATION OF 

HICAGO 

HEOLOGICAL 

CHOOLS 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 

GaRRETT-Ev ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/ Lombard Theological School 
Mundelein Seminary 
North Park Theological Seminary 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
19 9 3-1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Association of Chicago Theological Schools 

Basic Information 






1 
1 


The Member Seminaries 






2 


Common Council 






8 


Faculty Area Groups 






8 


Subclusters and Cooperative Activities 






13 


Northside Chicago Theological Institute 






13 


The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools 




13 


The Committee on Inter institutional Cooperation 




14 


World Mission Institute 






14 


ACTS Doctor of Ministry in Preaching 






14 


ACTS Travel Study Opportunities 






14 


Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 






15 


Hyde Park Joint African- American Resources 




16 


Clinical Pastoral Education Program of the Hyde Park Cluster 


16 


Chicago Center For Global Ministries 






17 


Non-Credit Language Courses 






17 


Cooperating Institutions 






18 


Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 




18 


Centro Para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato 




18 


Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 




19 


Spertus College of Judaica 






19 


The Women of Faith Resource Center 






20 


Library Resources 






21 


1993 Summer Programs 






23 


Academic Calendars 






28 


Information about Course Listings 






33 


Course Descriptions 






37 


Fall 


Winter 


Spring 




Biblical Studies 37 


63 


88 




Historical Studies 43 


68 


93 




Theological Studies 45 


70 


96 




Ethical Studies 49 


75 


98 




Religion and Society Studies 5 1 


76 


99 




World Mission Studies 52 


77 


100 




History of Religions 53 


78 


101 




Ministry Studies 53 


78 


102 




Special Areas of Interest Within Courses of Study 




109 


African- American Studies 






109 


Asian Studies 






109 


Cross-Cultural Studies 






110 


Hispanic Studies 






111 


Judaic Studies 






111 


Urban and Public Policy Studies 






112 


Women's Studies 






113 


ACTS Personnel 






114 


Faculty and Executive Officers 






114 


Librarians 






136 


Locations of ACTS Schools 






140 



Catalog Editor: Jeannette F. Scholcr 



ASSOCIATION 

OF 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



BASIC INFORMATION 

The Association of Chicago Theological Schools, known as ACTS, was formed in 
1984 by twelve theological schools located in or near Chicago to provide means for 
cooperation among its member institutions in the areas of student cross-registration, 
library access and acquisitions, interchange among faculty members in the various disci- 
plines of theological education, and communications between the schools. Prior to 
1984, these schools had had many years of successful ecumenical cooperation, primarily 
through the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, the Chicago Theological Institute, 
and the Library Council. In addition to ACTS, various agreements between two or 
more institutions provide subclustering for cooperation according to specific programs 
and/or geographical proximity (see pp. 13-17). 

All of the schools in ACTS are accredited members of the Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada. Each is affiliated with or sponsored by a 
denomination, a diocese, a religious organization or several religious orders. Each offers 
professional degree programs for ministry at the master's and doctoral levels, and most 
offer other academic degrees as well. All offer some variety of continuing education for 
clergy and lay leaders, and conferences, lectures and other programs of interest to a 
wider public. 

Together, the schools within ACTS offer a rich network of resources for theological 
education, making it one of the outstanding centers of theological education in the 
world. Available to the approximately 3000 students currently enrolled at its member 
schools is a faculty of some 300, over 1000 courses offered annually, and library collec- 
tions of over 1.5 million volumes and nearly 5000 currently received periodical subscrip- 
tions. Several schools have well-stocked theological bookstores. Additionally, ACTS 
makes it possible for students and faculty to pursue their work, study and reflection in 
interaction with people from many different cultural and theological traditions. 

Students in ACTS schools also have access to many other resources pertinent to the- 
ological education available through institutions related to ACTS (see pp. 18-20). 
Many also draw on the vast resources of other institutions of higher education and the 
numerous religious organizations and agencies in the Chicago area related to one or 
more of the institutions in ACTS. 

ACTS itself does not offer either courses or degrees. Application for enrollment is 
made to one of the member institutions. 

An essential tool for cross-registration purposes, this catalog also includes information 
about utilizing the many resources for theological education available to students 
enrolled in member schools of ACTS. 

The current chairperson of ACTS is Donald Senior, C.P. of Catholic Theological 
Union. Maureen Meter of Catholic Theological Union is Treasurer. Inquiries regarding 
ACTS should be directed to President Donald Senior, C.P; Catholic Theological 
Union, 5401 South Cornell Avenue, Chicago, IL 60615-5698; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

1 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as peace, 
discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholarship and love 
where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for personal growth. 
Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings oriented toward integration of 
heritage and ministerial competencies. 




President 

Academic Dean 

Dean of Students 

Treasurer and Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

M.A.Th. 
M.Div. 



Eugene F. Roop 

Richard B. Gardner 

John J. Cassel 

Kaysa A. McAdams 

Theresa C. Eshbach 

Mark E. Sloan 



Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, 1L 60521 

708-620-2200 

FAX 708-620-9014 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



A collaborative school serving thirty-three religious orders, founded to promote diverse 
theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on 
preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by strong field edu- 
cation programs. Other special features: D.Min. concentrations in Cross-Cultural 
Ministries, Liturgy or Spirituality; fully individualized research or general academic 
M.A.; M.Div. concentrations in Bible, Pastoral Theology, World Mission or Word and 
Worship; World Mission Program designed to prepare American and international stu- 
dents to minister in other cultures; studies in African American and Hispanic Ministry. 
Programs open to all serious students, men and women. 

President 

Vice President and Academic Dean 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Dean of Students and Community Services 

Director of D.Min. Program 

Director of M.Div. Program 

Director ofM.A. Program 

Director of M .A .P.S. Program 

Director of Continuing Education 

Registrar 



Donald Senior, C.R 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. 

Maureen M. Meter 

Ellen McClure, O.S.F. 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.R 

Keiren O'Kelly 

Mary Regina Ulmer 



Degree Programs: 

M.A.P. S. 

M.A. in Theology 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (5 years in ministry prerequisite) 



catholic 

TIM)IXX;iC\L UNION 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60615-5698 

312-324-8000 

FAX 312-324-4360 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering rig- 
orous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and professional 
integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree pro- 
gram is the three year Master of Divinity, but the Master of Arts in Religious Studies 
may be awarded at the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The post- 
M.Div. Doctor of Ministry is available full- or part-time for students with experience in 
ministry. Joint programs with pastoral care institutions and a dual degree program with 
the School of Social Service Administration of the University of Chicago are available. 
The Ph.D. programs focus on Christian-Jewish Relations and Theology, Ethics and the 
Human Sciences. 

President Kenneth B. Smich 

Academic Dean William R. Myers 

Registrar and Director of Studies Cheryl W. Miller 

Dean of Student Life/Director of Field Education Richard D. Lewis 

Director of Recruitment Virginia DeRolf 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Delois Shepard 

Vice-President for Business Affairs Linda L. Luckey 

Vice-President for Development Stephen J. Davidson 




5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637-9990 

312-752-5757 

FAX 312-752-5925 



Degree Programs: 

M.A. In Religious Studies 

M.Div. 

S.T.M. 

D.Min. 

Ph.D. 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Garrett-Evangelical is a graduate divinity school of the United Methodist Church. 
While the majority of the faculty and the students is affiliated with the school's denomi- 
national heritage, the seminary is ecumenical in religious and educational approaches. 
The curricula emphasize theory and practice; they include the institutional emphases on 
The Church and the Black Experience, Peace and Justice, and Women in Ministry. The 
basic programs lead to the Master of Divinity, Master of Christian Education or Master 
of Theological Studies degrees. The advanced professional program leads to the Doctor 
of Ministry degree, while the Joint Program with Northwestern University leads to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

President Neal F. Fisher 

Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs Rosemary S. Keller 

Director of the Ph.D. Program Jack. L. Seymour 

Vice President for Adminis tradon Adolf M . Hansen 

Vice President for Development David L. Heetland 

Registrar Margaret A. Magee 

Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 
M.C.E 
M.T.S. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
Ph.D. (joint program with N.U.) 




2121 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201-3298 

708-866-3900 

FAX 708-866-3957 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 



Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, aca- 
demic study of theology. The M.Div. curriculum features strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the church and a comprehensive field work program, with special emphasis 
on cross-cultural ministry and global awareness. Opportunities offered for specialization 
in Hispanic Ministries, Ministry and Social Work, and coordinated M.Div./Ph.D. (with 
the University of Chicago). 



«? 
$ 



#m 



<L 




1100 East 55th Street 

Chicago, IL 60615-5199 

312-753-0700 

FAX 312-753-0782 



President 

Dean 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Vice President for Development 

Dean of the Community 

Director of Recruitment and Admissions 

Director, Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

and Extension Education 
Director ofM.A. Program 
Registrar 



William E. Lesher 

Ralph W.Klein 

Joseph L. Rodrick 

Donovan J. Palmquist 

TBA 

Christopher E. Eldredge 

Jose David Rodriguez 

Wesley J. Fuerst 

Robert L. Conrad 

KurtK.Hendel 
Patricia Bartley 



Degree Programs: 

M.A. 

M.Div. 



Th.M./Th.D. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Mccormick theological seminary 

McCormick is a theological center for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also wel- 
comes many students from outside this denomination. It focuses its resources on educa- 
tion for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional (M.A.T.S. & M.Div.) and pro- 
fessional (D.Min.) studies. Its programs in Hispanic Studies, Korean-American 
Ministries, African- American Ministries, Women's Studies and Urban Ministry, its dual 
competency programs in Social Work and other fields, and its emphasis on internation- 
alization add to its other offerings. Students are encouraged to plan, with advice, their 
own courses of study. 

President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Dean of the Faculty 
Dean of Masters Programs 

Associate Dean for Experiential Education 
Dean of Doctoral Programs 
Director, Korean- American Ministries Center 

Associate Director 
Director, Hispanic Ministries Program 
Director, African-American Ministries Program 
Officer of Admissions & Registration 
Vice President for Finance and Operations 
EHrectorfor Funds Development 



TBA 
Heidi Hadsell 

Thomas D. Parker 

Deborah F. Mullen 

Lois Gehi Livezey 

Howard Kang 

Hearn Chun 

TBA 

Homer U. Ash by, Jr. 

TBA 

H. Kris Ronnow 

Bernard W. Nord 




Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Theological Studies 
M.Div./M.S.W. 



M.Div. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 



5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60637-1692 
312-947-6300 
FAX 312-947-0376 



MEADVILLE / LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 



Meadville/Lombard is an independent theological school affiliated with the University 
of Chicago and with the Unitarian Universalist Association. The mission of the School 
includes empowerment of liberal religious congregations and voluntary associations 
through the preparation of men and women for ministry, religious education and com- 
munity outreach. Meadville/Lombard's educational process includes teaching, research, 
critical reflection and institutional outreach and dialogue with persons of non-Christian 
faiths. The School offers the M.Div., D.Min. (in sequence) or the M.A. in Religious 
Education degrees and is accredited. 




5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637-1602 

312-753-3195 

FAX 312-753-1323 



Dean and Chief Executive 

Librarian 

Registrar/Director far Student and Academic 

Services/Financial Aid Officer 
Dean of Students 
Business Manager 
Development Officer 
Admissions Officer 



Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Religious Education 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (in sequence) 



Spencer Lavan 

Neil W. Gerdes 

Cecelia E. Smith 

Michelle Bentley 

Randall Vaughn 

Elise Cade 

Lisa Sjoquist 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ST. MARY OF THE LAKE 



With roots in a charter granted over 140 years ago, Mundelein Seminary of the 
University of St. Mary of the Lake possesses the task of preparing candidates academi- 
cally, formationally and spiritually for the Roman Catholic priesthood. As a canonically 
erected Pontifical Theological Faculty, Mundelein Seminary of the University of St. 
Mary of the Lake is empowered to confer the Bachelor, Licentiate, and Doctoral degrees 
in Sacred Theology. While originally most of the students attending Mundelein 
Seminary came from the Archdiocese of Chicago, its alumni now include students from 
other dioceses in the State of Illinois and throughout the country. 



Rector 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Dean of Formation 

Director of Finance 

Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 
S.T.B. 
S.T.L. 
D.Min. 



Gerald F. Kicanas 

Martin A. Zielinski 

Celia Wilson 

Thomas E. Hickey 

Ronald M. Pfeiffer 




Mundelein, IL 600604174 

708-566-6401 

FAX 708-566-7330 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

North Park Theological Seminary, founded in 1891, is the graduate school of theology 
of the Evangelical Covenant Church. It is a professional school designed to educate peo- 
ple for ministry, whether as pastors, missionaries, church educators or trained laity. The 
seminary is a community of professors and students gathered not only for the purpose of 
theological study, but for worship, fellowship and the deepening of the spiritual life. 
Further, the seminary includes in its purposes the continuing education of ministers. It 
sees itself as a servant of the Church of Jesus Christ, and particularly, of the Evangelical 
Covenant Church. 




President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Associate Dean 



NorthPark Dean °f Students 

TheologicalSeminary Degree Programs: 



David G. Horner 

TBA 

TBA 

Stephen R. Graham 

Paul Koptalc 



3225 W. Foster Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60625-4895 

312-478-2696 

FAX 312-267-2362 



M.Div. 

M.A.C.E. 

M.A.T.S. 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological educa- 
tion of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scriptures is con- 
sidered foundational. Hie faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry in a community 
of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring community. The 
Seminary has an evangelical commitment, is related to the American Baptist Churches, 
U.S.A., welcomes students from all Christian traditions and encourages participation in 
ecumenical dialogue. 



President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and 

Dean of the Seminary 
Vice President for Business Administration 
Vice President for Institutional Advancement 
Registrar 

Admissions and Recruitment 
Director of Field Education 
Director of Doctoral Studies 
Director of Hispanic Studies 
Director of the Theodora W. Grow Center 

for the Renewal of the Churches 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Christian Education 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Ian M. Chapman 

E. Alfred Jenkins 

David L. Nichols 

Theodore Y. Rodgers IV 

Phyllis Rodgerson Pleasants 

Dean's Office 

William R. Nelson 

Robert G. Duffett 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi 

William P. Clemmons 



<& 



'rKforthern baptist 
theological seminary 

660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, IL 60148-5698 

708-620-2101 (President's Office) 

708-620-2103 (Dean's Office) 

708-620-2105 (Registrar's Office) 

FAX 708-620-2194 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seabury- Western Seminary, one of the eleven accredited seminaries of the Episcopal 
Church, is a largely residential seminary committed to providing excellence in academic 
preparation for congregational leadership. Worship, offered three times a day, is central 
to community life. The student body reflects the breadth of Anglican tradition, drawing 
students from 25 or more states each year. Located just across the street from Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary, the two schools have joined forces to form the United Library 
which provides an outstanding theological library of 287,000 volumes. Students study- 
ing at Seabury-Western experience the distinctive eclecticism that characterizes 
Anglicanism. 




2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201-2938 

708-328-9300 

FAX 708-328-9624 



Dean and President 

Associate Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Vice President for Finance and Administration 

Director of Development 

Registrar 

Director of D .Min. Program 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
M.T.S. 
D.Min. 



Mark S. Sisk 

William P. Haugaard 

Alan R. McLean 

Jane W. Strehlow 

Leonel L. Mitchell 

Charles L. Winters 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is maintained by the Evangelical Free Church of 
America to educate men and women for a world-wide Christian ministry as pastors, mis- 
sionaries, teachers, and lay-workers who are committed to God for a particular service 
for which they recognize a need for seminary studies. The Divinity School welcomes the 
opportunity of assisting students from all denominations and independent non-denomi- 
national churches who are seeking preparation for fruitful Christian life and ministry. 

President Kenneth M. Meyer 

Executive Vice President of Operations Milo D. Lundell 
Senior Vice President of Education & Academic Dean W Bingham Hunter 

Senior Vice President of Enrollment Management John Gredy 

Senior Vice President of Institutional Advancement R. Mark Dillon 

Vice President of Student Services Melvin D. Svendsen 

Vice President of Professional Doctoral Programs Warren S. Benson 

Associate Academic Dean Barry J. Beitzel 

Director of Doctor of Education, Doctor of Missiology, Ted W. Ward 

Dean of International Studies 

Associate Dean of Academic Doctoral Programs Nigel M. de S. Cameron 

and Director of Doctor of Philosophy 

Director of Records Jeffrey J. Millenson 




Degree Programs: 

M.A. (eight areas) 

M.Div. 

Th.M. 

M.A.R. 

M.R.E. 



Ed.D. (4 years experience prerequisite) 
D.Min. (3 years experience prerequisite) 
D.Miss (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
Ph.D. (M.Div. prerequisite) 



TRINITY 

EVANGELICAL 

DIVINITY 

SCHOOL 

2065 Half Day Road 

Deerfield, IL 60015-1283 

708-945-8800 

FAX 708-317-8141 



COMMON COUNCIL 

OF THE 

ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Eugene F. Roop 

Donald Senior, C.P. 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Neal F. Fisher 

William E. Lesher 

TBA 

Spencer Lavan 

Gerald F. Kicanas 

David G. Horner 

Ian M. Chapman 

Mark S. Sisk 

Kenneth M. Meyer 



Bethany Theological Seminary (BTS) 
Catholic Theological Union (CTU) 
Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) 
Garrett- Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC) 
McCormick Theological Seminary (MTS) 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (M/L) 
Mundelein Seminary (MS) 
North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary (NBTS) 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary (S-WTS) 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS 



OLD TESTAMENT 



Barry Beitzel (TEDS) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 

Phyllis Bird (G-ETS) 

Robert Boling (MTS) 

Edward Campbell (MTS) 

Mary Deeley (S-WTS- Adj.) 

Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 

Victoria Garvey, R.S.M. (S-WTS) 

Emmanuel Grantson (MTS- Adj.) 

YunChunHan(MTS-Adj.) 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) 

Leslie Hoppe, O.FM. (CTU) 

David Howard, Jr. (TEDS) 

Ralph Klein (LSTC) 

Paul Koptak (NPTS) 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) 

Dennis Magary (TEDS) 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) 

Claude Mariottini (NBTS) 

Robert Marshall (LSTC) 

Walter Michel (LSTC) 

Peter Nash (G-ETS) 

Hayim Goren Perel muter (CTU) 

Raymond Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) 

Eugene Roop (BTS) 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) 

John Sailhamer (TEDS) 



(See final pages for biographical data.) 

Herman Schaalmann (CTS- Adj.; 

G-ETS-Adj.) 
Robert Schoenstene (MS) 
Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) 
Karen Summers (MTS- Adj.) 
Willem VanGemeren (TEDS) 



NEW TESTAMENT 

Linda Belleville (NPTS) 

Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Robert Brawley (MTS) 

Donald Carson (TEDS) 

JungsikCha(MTS-Adj.) 

Charles Cosgrove (NBTS) 

O.C.Edwards, Jr. (S-WTS) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

Richard Gardner (BTS) 

Adolf Hansen (G-ETS) 

James Harrill (CTU-Adj.) 

Murray Harris (TEDS) 

Estella Boggs Horning (NBTS- Adj.) 

W Bingham Hunter (TEDS) 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (MS- Adj.) 

Walter Liefeld (TEDS) 

Wilhelm Linss (LSTC- Emeritus) 

John Lodge (MS) 

James Mcllhone (MS) 



Scot McKnight (TEDS) 
Margaret Mitchell (MTS) 
Douglas Moo (TEDS) 
Christopher Mount (MTS-Adj.) 
Grant Osborne (TEDS) 
Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Chang Hwan Park (MTS- Adj.) 
Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 
Barbara Reid, O.P (CTU) 
David Rhoads(LSTC) 
David Scholer (NPTS) 
Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) 
Graydon Snyder (CTS) 
Klyne Snodgrass (NPTS) 
Richard Stegner (G-ETS) 
Sarah Tanzer (MTS) 
Osvaldo Vena (MTS/LSTC-Adj.) 
Herold Weiss (NBTS-Affil.) 

CHURCH HISTORY 

Philip Anderson (NPTS) 
Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 
Dorothy Bass (CTS) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
David Daniels III (MTS) 
Donald Dayton (NBTS) 
Dawn DeVries (MTS) 
John Charles Godbey (M/L) 
Justo Gonzalez (LSTC/MTS-Vis.) 
Stephen Graham (NPTS) 
Dennis Groh (G-ETS) 
William Haugaard (S-WTS) 
KurtHendel(LSTC) 
Lawrence Hennessey (MS) 
Cynthia Jurisson (LSTC) 
Rosemary Keller (G-ETS) 
William Kuntze (CTS- Adj.) 
Dennis Laskey (S-WTS-Adj.) 
Jong Min Lee (MTS- Adj.) 
Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 
Leonel Mitchell (S-WTS) 
Larry Murphy (G-ETS) 
Thomas Nettles (TEDS) 
Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 
Phyllis Rodgerson Pleasants (NBTS) 
V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS- Adj.) 
Daniel Rodriguez- Diaz (MTS) 
Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU- Adj.; 
MS- Adj.) 



Kenneth Sawyer (MTS- Adj.) 
Eleanor Stebner (CTS- Adj.) 
James Stein (G-ETS) 
Murray Wagner (BTS) 
John Woodbridge (TEDS) 
Martin Zielinski (MS) 

THEOLOGY 

Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 

Robert Barron (MS) 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) 

Donald Bloesch (BTS- Adj.) 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU- Adj.) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Harold Brown (TEDS) 

Ralph Burhoe (M/L-Emeritus) 

John Burkhart (MTS) 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) 

Sara Butler, M.S.B.T (MS) 

Louis Cameli (MS) 

Nigel Cameron (TEDS) 

Anna Case- Winters (MTS) 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU-Adj, 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Tom Deal (BTS- Adj.) 

John Feinberg (TEDS) 

Paul Feinberg (TEDS) 

Bruce Fields (TEDS) 

Brian Fischer (MS) 

Neal Fisher (G-ETS) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

Nadine Pence Frantz (BTS) 

James Griffiss (S-WTS-Adj.) 

Warren GrofY (BTS-Emeritus) 

Wayne Grudem (TEDS) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F. M. (CTU) 

Philip Hefner (LSTC) 

Carl Henry (TEDS-Vis.) 

Theodore Jennings (CTS) 

Kenneth Kantzer (TEDS) 

Spencer La van (M/L) 

Leo Lefebure (MS) 

Perry LeFevre (CTS-Emeritus) 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU-Adj.) 

John McDonnell (MS) 

Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

Thomas Parker (MTS) 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 



Jamie T. Phelps, O.P.(CTU) 

Gene Reeves (M/L) 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC) 

Rosemary Ruether (G-ETS) 

Robert Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) 

Douglas Sharp (NETS) 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) 

Gorman Sullivan, O.Carm. (MS) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (CTS) 

DwightVogel (G-ETS) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC/MTS-Adj.) 

Bruce Ware (TEDS) 

C.JohnWeborg(NPTS) 

VitorWesthelle(LSTC) 

James Will (G-ETS) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 

ETHICS 

Patrick Boyle, S.J. (MS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Toinette Eugene (G-ETS) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) 

Reinhard Hotter (LSTC) 

Jerome Listecki (MS) 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F. M. (CTU) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) 

Timothy Sedgwick (S-WTS) 

Richard Tholin (G-ETS) 

Kenneth Vaux (G-ETS) 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

WORLD MISSION 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS-Affil.) 
Claude Marie Barbour (CTU/MTS) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
Robert Coleman (TEDS) 
William Danker (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Eleanor Doidge (MTS; CTU- Adj.) 
Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 



Paul Hiebert (TEDS) 

Juan Huitrado, M.C.C.J. (CTU-Adj.) 

Yoshiro Ishida (LSTC) 

John Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) 

David Lindberg (LSTC) 

Lois McKinney (TEDS) 

Harold Netland (TEDS) 

John Nyquist (TEDS) 

Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. (CTU) 

Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. (CTU) 

Edward Rommen (TEDS) 

James Scherer (LSTC-Emeritus) 

Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 

UKyaw Than (LSTC- Vis.) 

Ruth Tucker (TEDS-Vis.) 

Harold Vogelaar (LSTC-Vis.) 

Wayne Weld (NPTS) 

MINISTRY: ITS NATURE 
AND PRACTICE 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS-Affil.) 
Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
John Cassel (BTS) 
Hearn Chun (MTS) 
William Clemmons (NBTS) 
Penelope Cukr (CTS- Adj.) 
Mary Janet Dahm (CTS- Adj.) 
Robert Duffett (NBTS) 
WDowEdgerton(CTS) 
Nadine Pence Frantz (BTS) 
Gregory Galluzzo (MTS- Adj.) 
Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 
James Hargleroad (MTS-Adj.) 
Thomas Hawkins (MTS) 
Steven Janco (MS) 
E.Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) 
Howard Kang (MTS) 
Andrew Kim (MTS-Adj.) 
Gerald Kicanas (MS) 
Jane Koonce (NPTS- Adj.) 
John Lozano, C.M.F. (CTU) 
Jeffrey Mahan (G-ETS) 
Joseph Mariano (MTS-Adj.) 
Mary Ann McDermott (CTS- Adj.) 
Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 
Deborah Mullen (MTS) 
William Nelson (NBTS) 
David Ramage, Jr. (MTS) 
Jerold Reed (NPTS) 



10 



Lilian Ross (S-WTS) 
Kenneth Smith (CTS) 
Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 
Robert Tuttle, Jr. (G-ETS) 
Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 
Charles Winters (S-WTS) 
Richard Wojcik (MS) 
Robert Worley (MTS) 

PASTORAL CARE 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) 

James Ashbrook (G-ETS) 

Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 

Kathleen Billman (LSTC) 

George Cairns (CTS) 

Edward Cronin (MS) 

David Dillon (TEDS) 

Joseph Byung 11 Doh (MTS- Adj.) 

Ian Evison (M/L-Adj.) 

Geraldine Flynn (MS) 

Judith Golz (TEDS- Vis.) 

Warren Heard, Jr. (TEDS) 

Thomas Hickey (MS) 

John Hinkle (G-ETS) 

David Hogue (G-ETS) 

Everett Jackson (NFTS) 

Emma Justes (NBTS) 

Spencer La van (M/L) 

Thomas Mainor (CTS/MTS-Adj.) 

David McKay (TEDS- Adj.) 

Frances McWilliams (MTS- Adj.) 

Bonnie Miller-McLemore (CTS) 

Robert Moore (CTS) 

Robert Myers (S-WTS- Adj.) 

Lallene Rector (G-ETS) 

Daniel Schipani (NBTS-Affil.) 

Woon San Sohn (G-ETS) 

Sharon Thornton (CTS-Adj. BTS-Adj. 

Larry Ulrich (BTS-Adj.) 

PaulWachdorf(MS) 

Bartholomew Winters (MS) 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
JohnCassel(BTS) 
Calvin Hanson (TEDS) 
Richard Lewis (CTS) 
David Lindberg (LSTC) 
Jeffrey Mahan (G-ETS) 
Howard Matson (TEDS) 



Frances McWilliams 

(CTS/LSTC/MTS/M/L-Adj.) 
Veronica Mendez (MS) 
Deborah Mullen (MTS) 
William Nelson (NBTS) 
Lilian Ross (S-WTS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
John Szura, O.S.A. (CTU-Adj.) 
Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 
Raymond Webb (MS) 
Charles Winters (S-WTS) 



WORSHIP AND PREACHING 

Mark Bangert (LSTC) 

Richard Bodey (TEDS) 

Michael Bullmore (TEDS) 

Ian Chapman (NBTS) 

Donald Chatfield (G-ETS) 

William Clemmons (NBTS) 

Ruth Duck (G-ETS) 

Robert Duffett (NBTS) 

Royce Eckhardt (NPTS- Adj.) 

O. C. Edwards, Jr. (S-WTS) 

Nancy Faus (BTS) 

Robert Finster (S-WTS) 

Edward Foley, O.F M. Cap. (CTU) 

Richard Fragomeni (CTU) 

Mark Francis, C.S.V (CTU) 

Frederic Hang, C.Ss.R. (CTU-Adj.) 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

DaiKyunKim(MTS-Adj.) 

Paul Koptak (NPTS) 

David Larsen (TEDS) 

Paul Manz (LSTC- Emeritus) 

Barbara Jo McDevitt (MTS- Adj.) 

Leonel Mitchell (S-WTS) 

Morris Niedenthal (LSTC) 

Carol Noren (NPTS) 

Theodore Olsen (TEDS) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F. M. (CTU) 

Mara Liz Rivera (MTS- Adj.) 

Jay Rochelle (LSTC) 

Daniel Siwek (MS) 

James Speer (TEDS) 

Frank Thomas (MTS- Adj. /NBTS- Adj.) 

DwightVogel (G-ETS) 

DonWardlaw(MTS) 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

Andrew Weyermann (LSTC- Vis.) 



11 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Carol Allen (BTS-Adj.) 
Frances Anderson (NPTS) 
Wan-en Benson (TEDS) 
Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 
Linda Cannell (TEDS) 
William Clemmons (NBTS) 
Robert Conrad (LSTC) 
Perry Downs (TEDS) 
Juan Feliciano (G-ETS) 
Susan Harlow (M/L) 
E.Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) 
Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 
Judith Mannheim (M/L) 
Taylor McConnell (G-ETS-Adj.) 



William Myers (CTS) 
David Owens (CTS-Adj.) 
Lilian Ross (S-WTS) 
Wanda Scoble (NBTS-Adj.) 
Charles Sell (TEDS) 
Mark Senter (TEDS) 
Jack Seymour (G-ETS) 
Linda Vogel (G-ETS) 
Ted Ward (TEDS) 
Daniel Webster (TEDS-Vis.) 
Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

CANON LAW 

John Dolciamore (MS) 

Gary Neville, O.Praem. (CTU) 



12 



SUBCLUSTERS AND COOPERATIVE ACTIVITIES 

NORTHSIDE CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE (NCTI) 

The Northside Chicago Theological Institute (NCTI) was organized by five theologi- 
cal schools in 1974 for educational and ecumenical purposes: Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary, North Park Theological Seminary, Seabury-Western Theological 
Seminary, Mundelein Seminary and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The schools are located on the north side of the greater Chicago area, with one in 
Chicago, two on contiguous campuses in Evanston adjacent to Northwestern University, 
one in Deerfield and one in Mundelein. 

The activities of the NCTI are under the direction of a Board of Directors whose offi- 
cers are elected annually. From its beginning the NCTI has emphasized the importance 
of student representation on its boards and committees. 

The NCTI sponsors three events annually: two academic courses and one religious 
observance. 

In January each member school of NCTI observes the Week of Prayer for Christian 
Unity through activities appropriate to its own tradition. Exchange of pulpit speakers is 
one practice that has proven to be an enrichment of the schools at this time. 

The Spring Seminar offered annually is a three-hour course which has addressed vari- 
ous theological themes in a variety o( forms. In recent years the seminar has focused on 
the diversity in which Christians oi many traditions understand "Life in the Spirit." In 
its present format the seminar includes two overnight, intensive retreat experiences on 
the campus of Mundelein Seminary. Registration for the seminar is limited in number. A 
minimal fee is requested of student participants. Further information regarding the "Life 
in the Spirit" Seminar can be obtained from Professor John Weborg, Coordinator 
(NPTS); Phone: 312-478-2696 or from Sister Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M., NCTI 
Executive Secretary (MS); Phone: 708-879-2901 or 708-879-2921. 

A Fall Seminar on the Church and its mission offered in September is also a three- 
hour course. Further information can be obtained from Professor Charles L. Winters, 
Coordinator (S-WTS); Phone: 708-328-9300 or from Professor Richard A. Bodey, 
Coordinator (TEDS); Phone: 708-945-8800. 

THE HYDE PARK CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS (CLUSTER) 

The five ACTS schools located in Hyde Park (Catholic Theological Union, Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, and Meadville/Lombard Theological School) and the Divinity 
School of the University of Chicago identify themselves as The Hyde Park Cluster of 
Theological Schools (Cluster). The Cluster seeks ways to deepen academic cooperation 
and sharing beyond those made possible by the ACTS structure. 

The purposes of the Cluster are to: (1) promote academic cooperation among the 
schools in Hyde Park; (2) foster dialogue and scholarship among its faculties through 
support of discipline groups and interdisciplinary colloquies; (3) develop support for aca- 
demic programs through cooperative student services, recruitment, and language pro- 
grams; and (4) aid in communication and planning among the member institutions. 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools is administered by a committee con- 
sisting of the chief academic officers of the six schools. For 1993-1994 the Chair of 
this committee is Spencer Lavan of Meadville/Lombard Theological School; 
Phone: 312-753-3195. The chief executive officers of the cooperating institutions serve 
as an advisory board to the committee, especially in those areas related to institutional 
planning. 

13 



THE COMMITTEE ON INTERINSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION (CIC) 

The Committee on Interinstitutional Cooperation (CIC) was established in 1975 by 
Bethany Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, which are 
located on adjacent campuses in west suburban Oak Brook and Lombard. The CIC is 
composed of the presidents, the deans and the business managers of BTS and NBTS, 
and the director of the Seminary Library, which serves both schools. 

The CIC engages in joint planning and discussion related to various areas of coopera- 
tion and common interests such as library, bookstore, student housing, class scheduling, 
curriculum planning and course offerings, and faculty professional growth events. 

WORLD MISSION INSTITUTE (WMI) 

The World Mission Institute (WMI) is an annual conference, usually held in April, 
sponsored since 1970 by member schools of ACTS, along with several other educational 
and mission organizations. Each year outstanding international speakers and resource 
persons deal with a significant aspect of Christian world mission. The 1993 WMI 
focused on the theme: "Christian-Muslim Relations: Toward a Just World Order." 

All students and faculty of ACTS schools are invited to participate in the WMI with- 
out registration charges. Inquiries regarding WMI should be addressed to: WMI 
Coordinator, c/o Center for Global Mission, 1100 East 55th Street, Chicago, IL 60615; 
Phone:312-753-0672. 

ACTS DOCTOR OF MINISTRY IN PREACHING 

A Doctor of Ministry in Preaching is offered by a sub-cluster of six ACTS schools as 
an accepted program of the Association. The six schools are: Chicago Theological 
Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, 
North Park Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary and 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary. The program is ecumenical in nature and cross- 
disciplinary in its design. The curriculum includes three summer residencies of three 
weeks each in Chicago, plus two parish courses and a final thesis. Each student's pro- 
gram is tailored to his or her needs in consultation with a supervisor and peers in the res- 
idency, as well as with a parish advisory committee. Interested persons should inquire 
through Don M. Wardlaw, Director, ACTS D.Min. in Preaching Program, 5555 S. 
Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637; Phone: 312-947-6270. 

ACTS TRAVEL STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities to travel and study in a variety of places outside Chicago for course 
credit are offered by several ACTS schools. These are listed below by geographical area 
and within the course descriptions beginning on page 37 according to field of study. 

Eastern Europe. G-ETS offers "The Vision and Praxis of Shalom" (2 1-681 A), study- 
ing peace and justice issues in contemporary developments in Russia and Russian- 
American relations, January 3-21, 1994. Participants will spend one week in Moscow, 
learning about developing Methodist ministries and one week in St. Petersburg, observ- 
ing Orthodox efforts to relate to new issues in society. Travel to Poland will be arranged 
if the political climate in Russia is unstable. For more information, contact Professor 
James Will, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3963. 

Ghana. The "Summer in Africa" cross-cultural immersion course is being offered by 
the Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies (TICCS) from mid-June to mid- August 
as an "approved summer ministry" of CTU. Participants will be involved for nine weeks 
in language-learning, culture-learning and ministry-learning. They will live in an 

14 



African village, learn basic texts in the language, interact with the people, and experi- 
ence the cultural roots of local church ministries. For more information, contact the 
director of the Cross -Cultural Ministries Department, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

Haiti and Cuba. G-ETS offers a travel seminar January 3-21, 1994, in "Liberation 
Theology," in which participants will visit and study Christian communities and the cul- 
tural/political context of Haiti and Cuba. For more information, contact Rosemary 
Ruether, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3953. 

Israel. CTU offers a program in Israel August 3-24, 1994, as an opportunity to reflect 
prayerfully on the Scriptures in the Holy Land. Half of each day is given to orientation 
to biblical sites and the other half for visiting biblical sites for prayer and reflection. For 
applications, contact the Director of Israel Programs, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

CTU will offer a second Israel program from May 25 to June 15, 1995 as a three- week 
intensive with guided exploration of biblical and historical sites. A prerequisite for the 
seminar is B 475» History and Archaeology of Israel. Participants receive three quarter 
credits for the trip. Application forms are available from the Director of Israel Programs, 
CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

G-ETS offers a cross-cultural archaeological and study experience in Israel's northern 
Negev region January 2-21, 1994, in cooperation with the Tel Nessana excavation pro- 
ject of Ben Gurion University of the Negev. The schedule combines excavation, study 
and touring. For more information, contact Dennis Groh; Phone: 708-866-3974, or 
Peter Nash; Phone: 708-866-3938. 

Japan. M/L can arrange special exchanges to Tsakuba University in Japan. For more 
information contact Dean Spencer Lavan; Phone: 312-753-3195. 

Middle East. CTU is offering an extended program of study and guided exploration of 
biblical sites August 25 - November 10, 1994. Coursework concentrates on the history 
and archaeology of Israel in a variety of Old and New Testament traditions. A ten-day 
Re-entry Seminar/Retreat conducted at CTU concludes the on-site program. 
Participants earn 12 graduate hours for the travel program and 3 graduate hours for the 
re-entry seminar. Deadline for applications is January 15, 1994- For applications, contact 
the Director of Israel Programs, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

MTS offers a three-week traveling seminar on Christianity in the Middle East in 
March, 1994. The experiences of the course are designed to locate Middle Eastern 
Chrisitanity — Orthodox, Protestant, Catholic — within its historical, theological, cul- 
tural and geographical context. Travel to Syria, Jordan, Israel/Palestine, Egypt and 
Cyprus will include visits to historic sites and to significant communities of renewal and 
of social change. For further information, contact the Dean's Office, MTS; 
Phone:312-947-6307. 

New Mexico. G-ETS offers an experience of systematic interaction in the Anglo, 
Hispanic and Pueblo cultures of northern New Mexico, January 3-21, 1994. In this 
course G-ETS 33-681, students focus on identifying the cross-cultural aspects of this set- 
ting, fostering attitudes, skills and techniques appropriate in a pluralistic society and 
designing cross-cultural ministries. For more information, contact Linda Vogel, G-ETS; 
Phone: 708-866-3954. 

JOINT HISPANIC MINISTRIES PROGRAM 

The Hispanic Ministries Program, offered jointly by McCormick Theological 
Seminary and the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, offers a concentration with- 
in the course of study of the regular M.Div. and M.A.T.S. degrees. The purpose of the 

15 



program is to prepare Hispanics and other bilingual persons to serve effectively in 
Hispanic communities. The program offers courses in all fields of the seminary curricu- 
lum and in the practice of ministry in local Hispanic settings. 

In addition to their own faculty, MTS and LSTC invite outstanding Hispanic theolo- 
gians and ministerial practitioners to their campuses to expand the resources available 
and to reinforce the identity of the Hispanic Ministries Program. 

HYDE PARK JOINT AFRICAN- AMERICAN RESOURCES 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools sponsors a Joint African- American 
Ministries Program which is composed of courses, field studies and formational activities 
intended to train effective church leaders for the special ministry needs of Black church- 
es in the urban setting. 

The following courses will be offered in Hyde Park during the 1993-94 academic year. 
They are open to all students. Hyde Park students who wish to take advantage of these 
offerings may, with permission of the academic dean of their school, utilize an African- 
American resource to meet required course distribution. For more information, contact 
the Director, Homer Ashby (MTS); Phone: 312-947-6330. 

Fall: 

Biblical Interpretation from an Afro-Centric Perspective (Granston), p. 39 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry (Phelps), p. 47 

Christian Theology I (Pero), p. 46 

Black Theology and the Black Church (Pero), p. 48 
Winter: 

Introduction to Pastoral Care (Ashby), p. 82 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Pero), p. 72 

Introducing Preaching (Wardlaw), p. 84 

Black Theology in Dialogue (Phelps), p. 72 
Spring: 

Preaching and the Preacher's Devotional Life (Thomas), p. 106 

Pastoral Care in the Black Church (Ashby), p. 104 

History and Polity of the United Church of Christ (Smith), p. 94 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage (Pero), p. 94 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION PROGRAM OF THE HYDE PARK CLUSTER 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools sponsors a Clinical Pastoral Education 
Program in Public Ministry, both in the summer and in an extended, year-long format. 
Accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, it offers a non- traditional 
CPE experience with focus on church and community. It brings together the CPE method- 
ology of integration of personal and professional attributes with the practice of ministry in 
urban agencies, parishes and community organizations. The goals of this program are: 

1. To experience ministry in a cross-cultural setting. 

2. To learn how to enter into an on-going community organization, agency or parish. 

3. To develop the ability to do social analysis. 

4. To discern and maintain a balance between ministry to individuals and ministry to 
structures. 



16 



5. To develop an awareness of the important linkages and connections necesssary in 
public ministry settings. 

6. To develop an awareness of different approaches to public ministry and to define 
an approach which is consistent with one's own theological tradition, 

7. To gain a sense of hope regarding involvment in the public sector. 

8. To develop an ability to be reflective on one's own learning process and to include 
others in that process. 

The summer basic program runs for eleven weeks, full-time (mid-June through late 
August), and the extended unit, thirty weeks, fifteen hours per week, in coordination 
with the seminary calendars. Tuition is $585. The application procedure is to complete 
the standard ACPE application and submit it by December 15 (for the summer) or June 
15 (for the fall), have an admission interview with a CPE supervisor, and meet with the 
Director of the program. There is a $25 application fee applicable to tuition, if accepted. 
For further information contact the Rev. Frances C. McWilliams, Director of CPE, 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Phone: 312-947-6300. 

CHICAGO CENTER FOR GLOBAL MINISTRIES 

To meet the growing challenges to preparation for ministry posed by globalization 
trends today, Catholic Theological Union, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 
and McCormick Theological Seminary established in 1993 the Chicago Center for 
Global Ministries. The purpose o{ the Center is both to coordinate more effectively cur- 
rent resources and to build upon those resources to meet the globalization challenge for 
ministry, especially in regard to cross-cultural ministries, world mission, interreligious 
dialogue and urban ministries. 

The Center serves as a focal point for these areas of ministry by coordinating course offer- 
ings, offering a forum for concerned faculty to come together around these issues, as well as 
providing a locus for new research efforts in these areas of globalization. At a time when 
theological education is becoming more international and multicultural, and the world 
itself manifests simultaneously a new concern for particularity and greater possibilities for 
communication, the work of the Chicago Center for Global Ministries embraces these para- 
doxes and complexities as the location for training ministers for the twenty-first century. 

For additional information, contact the Director, Robert Marshall (LSTC); Phone: 
312-753-0760. 

NON^CREDIT LANGUAGE COURSES 

Non-credit courses in Spanish, French, German and Latin, as warranted by student 
interest, are available to graduate students in the Chicago area through a program adminis- 
tered by the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools. The aim of the courses is to assist 
students to achieve facility in reading the respective languages. Such facility is required for 
certain degree programs, especially those beyond the M.Div. level. Moderate fees are 
charged. For further information, contact Celia Brickman; Phone: 312-643-5806. 



17 



COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 
(CASIRAS) 

This is an independent corporation, consisting of scientists and theologians. 
Although it is national in scope, it concentrates a number of its activities, as well as its 
administrative office, in Hyde Park and has developed an effective working relationship 
with neighboring theological schools. The founder is Ralph Wendell Burhoe (Emeritus, 
M/L), recipient of the 1980 Templeton Award. CASIRAS' activities are chiefly in coop- 
eration with the Chicago Center for Religion and Science (CCRS) at LSTC, of which 
it is a co-founder. For information about CCRS, see the 1991-93 catalog of LSTC, pp. 
70-71. 

CASIRAS and CCRS seek to achieve a greater integration between the scientific 
and religious models or images concerning the nature, destiny and moral behavior of 
humans. Dimensions of CASIRAS' work include seminars, courses, conferences, sym- 
posia and guided research as well as publishing Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science. In 
cooperation with LSTC and M/L, CASIRAS offers the advanced Seminar in Religion 
and Science (T-672) each year, usually in the spring quarter. 

For further information contact Professor Philip Hefner (LSTC); Phone: 312-753- 
0670. 



CENTRO PARA DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO Y LIDERATO (CDCL) 
Center for Community and Leadership Development 

3439 West North Avenue Executive Director: Hector Quintana 

Chicago, IL 60647 

312-489-4533 

Centro Para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato is a community based organization 
established in 1981 to serve the predominantly Latino community of the near northwest 
side of Chicago. Centro seeks to: (1) develop programs by creating networks o{ grass- 
roots organizations and churches (from all the denominations present in the area) to 
meet the needs of the community's poor and minority population; (2) do grassroots issue 
organizing to promote neighborhood stability and empowerment; (3) provide training to 
both community lay leaders and pastors on institutional development and strategies for 
resolving community issues; and, (4) provide consulting and technical assistance to 
grassroots organizations and churches on effective methodologies for leadership, institu- 
tional and community development. 

CDCL seeks to address the root causes of poverty in the Latino community of 
Chicago by raising the awareness level of community residents and assisting them in 
self-development, leadership skills and becoming self-sufficient. These leaders, in turn, 
become community assets in developing strategies to resolve or alleviate social prob- 
lems. CDCL's work is accomplished in relationship with well-established social, educa- 
tional and religious institutions. It serves as a center for the empowerment of leaders and 
the self-development and training of Latino pastors and residents of Chicago. 

18 



SEMINARY CONSORTIUM FOR URBAN PASTORAL EDUCATION 
(SCUPE) 

30 West Chicago Avenue President: David J. Frenchak 

Chicago, IL 60610 

312-944-2153 

The Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education provides specific programs of 
study in the area of urban pastoral education. SCUPE works cooperatively with Chicago 
area churches and community agencies and is committed to the development of compe- 
tent and creative leaders who both understand and can work with the realities of power, 
poverty and pluralism found in cities. 

For students interested in exploring urban ministry as a vocation, SCUPE provides a 
one year intensive program of urban pastoral education that is designed to fit into the 
core curriculum of a Master of Divinity degree. Through an integrated educational struc- 
ture of curriculum, church/agency internship and small group process, SCUPE students 
live, work and study in the city, developing both professional and personal skills. 
Representative courses include "Transforming Urban Systems," "The African-American 
Church in an Urban Setting" and "Biblical Theology of the City." 

Students not able to take the full year program but wanting part of their theological 
education to be focused on the context of the city may register for one quarter of urban 
ministry courses or may enroll in particular courses throughout the academic year. Fall 
quarter courses focus on understanding the city and the church in the city. Winter quar- 
ter courses focus on developing skills for ministry in the city. Spring quarter courses are 
designed to address the future development of the church and the city through strategies 
and planning for ministry in the city. Courses offered by the Seminary Consortium dur- 
ing the 1993-94 academic year are listed in the course descriptions in this catalog under 
the appropriate headings with a SCUPE prefix. 

Students from ACTS schools that are members of SCUPE (G-ETS, NPTS, NBTS 
and S-WTS) receive both academic and field education credit for the SCUPE program. 
Students from other ACTS schools are responsible to arrange details of accreditation 
and tuition payment through their seminary dean. 

SCUPE will also host the next Congress on Urban Ministry which will be held April 
11-14, 1994 at the Bismarck Hotel in Chicago. Jim Wallis of Sojourner magazine 
(Washington, D.C.) and Yvonne Delk of the Community Renewal Society (Chicago), 
are co-chairs. The Congress theme will focus on "Prophetic Voices of the People of God 
in the City: The Birth of New Visions." Sub themes will focus on "New Visions for 
Binding Relationships," "New Visions for Allocation of Resources" and "New Visions for 
Spiritual Transformations." A class is offered in conjunction with the Congress. 

For further information about SCUPE, contact Charles D. Cooper, Program Director. 

SPERTUS COLLEGE OF JUDAIC A (SCJ) 

618 South Michigan Avenue President: Howard A. Sulkin 

Chicago, IL 60605 Vice-President for Academic Affairs: Byron Sherwin 

312-922-9012 

Established in 1924, Spertus College of Judaica, a graduate institution, located in the 
Chicago Loop, offering graduate degree (master and doctoral) programs in Jewish stud- 
ies, is the largest non-rabbinic training institution of higher Jewish learning in the 
Midwest. In addition, Spertus College of Judaica provides adult continuing education in 
Jewish studies for the Chicago community at large and is a vibrant cultural resource cen- 
ter for Judaic learning and activities in Chicago and the Midwest. The College's Spertus 



19 



Museum and Asher Library hold the major collections of Jewish art, ritual objects, books 
and archives in the Chicago area. Use of these resources is available to faculty and stu- 
dents of ACTS schools. 

An agreement between Spertus College of Judaica and the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools was signed in 1978 to provide for cross- registration of students and 
library access. Various courses have been taught on ACTS campuses as well. Spertus 
courses are open for cross-registration for students of all ACTS schools, but special con- 
siderations may apply. Because procedures for cross-registration, acceptance of courses 
for credit and modes of payment may differ in individual schools, students are responsi- 
ble to determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

For further information about all the courses and programs of Spertus College of 
Judaica, contact the Office of Student Services. 

THE WOMEN OF FAITH RESOURCE CENTER 

5249 North Kenmore Avenue Coordinator: Gretchen Leppke 

Chicago, IL 60640 

312-271-9855 

The Women of Faith Resource Center is a place for women of faith, who come from 
diverse religious traditions, life experiences and commitments in the world and in the 
church, to be together for learning, support and networking. The women of the center 
are deeply committed to global issues which affect women and are seeking ways to work 
with women from different cultural groups in Chicago. As part of this emphasis, women 
of faith join in Creating Bridges, a program of Women for Economic Security, to build 
bridges of understanding across race and class barriers in Chicago. 

The Women of Faith Resource Center is a co-sponsor of the Women, Ministry and 
the City Summer Program (see p. 27). The Center also offers programs about women in 
ministry in the city, including discussions with women who work with the homeless, 
with abused women, with women's health issues, and women who minister in parishes in 
Chicago. Programs with varying emphases can be arranged for seminaries, schools and 
churches. 

The Center has a growing resource library of books and materials on feminist theolo- 
gy, Bible study, spirituality, language and liturgies, violence against women, economic 
and global issues. A group of women from the Resource Center are working on a 
research project on the socialization, sexuality and spirituality of girls 9-15 years old, 
with the aim of developing teaching materials. 



20 



LIBRARY RESOURCES 

THE LIBRARY COUNCIL OF ACTS 

The ACTS Library Council members' combined library collections comprise over 1 .5 
million volumes of books, about 5,000 currently received periodicals, electronic media 
equipment, and modern language laboratory facilities. Library locations and hours are 
listed on the following page. 

Circulation Policies. Students and faculty of the library council members' schools have 
borrowing privileges at all of the libraries but must abide by the circulation policies of each 
library. These users may also request at their local library material from other member 
libraries which will be sent through the courier. The courier's schedule is three times a week 
during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters and once a week during quarter breaks and the 
summer. Most libraries levy fines for overdue, damaged and lost library materials. 

In addition to the resources of the library council members' libraries, all libraries in 
the council have access to OCLC (The Online Library Computer Center), a national 
and international bibliographic date base through which accession to the collections of 
thousands of libraries and millions of volumes is made available. In addition, the United 
Library (GETS and SWTS) is part of the Northwestern University Library computerized 
system (NOTIS), and the Catholic Theological Union Library is part of IO (Illinet 
Online) which gives access to over eight hundred libraries in the state of Illinois. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The ACTS Library Council recognizes both its responsibility to share the richness of 
its combined theological resources and the benefits of networking in the face of finan- 
cial limitations. Therefore the Library Council commits itself to collaborative collection 
development and to cooperative organization of and access to resources for theological 
education. To achieve this mission: 

•The Library Council supports its member libraries in collecting resources to support 
constituent degree programs and scholarly research and to represent the religious tradi- 
tions of the member schools. 

• The Library Council by systematic planning identifies and coordinates the acquisition 
of resources in selecting religious traditions not represented in the member schools. 

•The Library Council seeks ways to provide access to those materials not collected by 

the member libraries. 
•The Library Council provides bibliographic access and document delivery of materials 

among member libraries. 

GOALS 

In order to carry out its mission, the ACTS Library Council has the following goals: 

•To provide ready access for the academic communities of the member institutions to 
information about the resources for the theological education and research available in 
the ACTS libraries. 

•To provide access to these resources themselves through reciprocal borrowing agree- 
ments, inter-library borrowing, and a courier service. 

•To insure the acquisition and maintenance of in-depth collections in the religious tra- 
ditions represented by the member institutions. 

• To prevent unintentional duplication of materials among member libraries. 

• To provide for a greater range of available resources through cooperative acquisition agree- 
ments. 

•To identify and maintain automated systems to support these programs for collection 
development and access. 

• To support programs for the conservation and preservation of ACTS library collections. 
•To enable consultation among ACTS librarians and communication between the 

Library Council and the Common Council of ACTS. 

21 



LIBRARIES OF THE ACTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

In the following listing the library location is given only in the instance of a joint 
library. Hours are given for regular academic sessions. 



8:00 A.M. 


- 10:00 P.M. 


8:30 A.M. 


- 4:30 P.M. 


12:00 M. 


- 5:00 P.M. 


5:00 P.M. 


- 10:00 p.m. 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
NORTHERN BAPTIST 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The Seminary Library 

BTS Campus 

708-620-2214 

Monday 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 P.M. 

Tuesday-Thursday 8:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. 

Friday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 6:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
The Library 

312-324-8000, Ext. 22 

Monday -Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Hammond Library 
312-752-5757, Ext. 225 

Monday-Thursday 8:30 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Saturday 10:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. 

Sunday 7:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

GARRETT-EVANGEL1CAL 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
SEABURY-WESTERN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The United Library 

Both Campuses 

708-866-3909, 708-866-3899 

Monday -Thursday 8:30 A.M. -10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 12:00 M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 7:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

AT CHICAGO 
McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
SOCIETY OF JESUS: CHICAGO PROVINCE 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
LSTC Campus 



MEADV1LLE/LOMBARD 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 
The Wiggin Memorial Library 
312-753-3196 

Monday-Friday 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

MUNDELE1N SEMINARY 

The Feehan Memorial Library 

708-566-6401, Ext. 50 

Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
North Park Consolidated Library 
312-583-2700, Ext. 5285 or 4081 

Monday -Thursday 7:45 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. 

Friday 7:45 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Saturday 10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. 

Sunday 1:00 P.M. - 12:00 P.M. 

TRINITY EVANGELICAL 
DIVINITY SCHOOL 

Rolfing Memorial Library 

708-317-8150 

Monday-Friday 7:30 A.M. - 11:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

WHEATON COLLEGE LIBRARIES 
Billy Graham Center Library 
708-752-5525; 708-752-5194 
Buswell Memorial Library 
708-752-5101; 708-752-5102 

Monday - Friday 8:00 A.M. - 9:45 P.M. 
Saturday 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 



312-753-0739 




Monday -Thursday 8:30 A.M. 


- 10:00 P.M 


Friday-Saturday 8:30 A.M. 


- 4:30 P.M 


Sunday 3:00 P.M. 


- 10:00 P.M 



22 



1993 SUMMER PROGRAMS 



A sizeable number of courses are available in summer programs offered by various 
ACTS institutions. The cross-registration agreements explained on page 37 apply only 
to the regular academic year. Students are encouraged to do summer study at schools 
other than their institutions of matriculation, but each student must register personally 
with the offering school or joint program for summer courses and make payment directly 
to that institution. 

To aid students in locating such summer study opportunities in the Chicago area, 
these programs are outlined below, giving only number, title, professor for each course, 
along with information as available about meeting times. (Please refer to pages 33-36 for 
interpretation of course numbers.) 

CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION — SUMMER INSTITUTE 1993 

CTU's Summer Institute schedules short intensive courses for those interested in con- 
tinuing education as well as for students seeking credits applicable to a degree program. 
One academic credit may be earned per course; additional credits may be earned by spe- 
cial arrangement. For more information contact Depaul Genska; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

Session I — June 14-18 

B 46 IS Rethinking Church (Bowe) 9-11:15 

E 450S To Care for the Earth I (Wcukll) 9-11:15 

D 445A The Catholic Church Today (Linnan) 1 :30-3:45 

I 408S Christians Examine the New Age (Fragomeni) 1:30-3:45 

B 413S Creation Theology - The Prophecy of Isaiah (Stuhlmuelkr) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 

MP439S Children, Teachers, Parents (Anderson/Johnson) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 

Session II — June 21-25 

E 45 1 S To Care for the Earth II (Wadell) 9-11:15 

B 453S I Corinthians (Mitchell) 9-11:15 

D445B Ministry, Leadership, Authority (Linnan) 1:30-3:45 

C 456S God Images in Mexican Popular Religiosity (Riebe-Estrella) 1:30-3:45 

B 416S Jeremiah: Poetry and Theology (Viviano) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 

I 415S Ministry as Call to Transformation (Gittins) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 

Session III — June 28 -July 2 

B 433 S Sermon on the Mount (Senior) 9-11:15 

C 462S Hispanic Pastoral Practices & Leadership Development (Rodriques) 9-11:15 

D 445C Reforming the Church (Linnan) 1 :30-3:45 

B 4 1 2S Ezekiel: Prophetic Voices of Ancient Israel (Hoppe) 1 :30-3 :45 

MW467S Understanding Ethnic Diversity in the Church Today (Adams) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 

S 417S Religious Life: Gift and Challenge (CahiWBeskar) 6:30-8:45 P.M. 



23 



CHICAGO SEMINARY SUMMER SESSION 1993 

The 1993 Chicago Seminary Summer Session is a joint project of five seminaries: 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, Meadville/Lombard Theological School and Wartburg 
Theological Seminary, Dubuque, Iowa. The program includes three-weeks of one-week 
intensives. It is designed for persons in degree programs such as M.A., M.Div. and 
D.Min. and also for Continuing Education Units. Course enrollments are limited to 
twenty students, and all classes meet Monday through Friday 8:30-4:30. A special fea- 
ture of the 1993 Summer Session will be a series oi presentations by Barbara Brown 
Taylor in the Chapel-Auditorium at LSTC during the week of June 21-25, Tuesday 
through Thursday at 1 1 30. 

Information about the program can be obtained by speaking with Michael B. Hefter or 
Robert L. Conrad from the Office of Extension Education, LSTC; Phone: 3 12-753-0748. 

Week One Courses - June 21-25 

SSM434 Pastoral Care and the Images of God (BilbmanlMigliore) 

SSM 41 1 The Outreach Task of the City Church (DeinesfKanass/Roschke) 

SSM 420 Building Pastoral Relationships (Halverstadt) 

SSB 4 1 1 The Book of Daniel (LaCocque) 

SSB 4 1 2 Covenant (Campbell) 

SSE 432 Growing Up into Our Baptism (Weborg) 

SSW 422 Muslim-Christian Relations (Vogebar) 

Week Two Courses - June 28 - July 2 

SSM 522 Personality Theories and Therapies I (Benson) 

SSM 421 Stewardship Ministries in the Local Church (Bell) 

SSM 416 Presbyterian Polity (Block) 

SSB 470 The Effect of Reading Mark's Gospel (Wegener) 

SST 479 Creation Faith: Toward a New Practical Theology (Hess/Galukn) 

SST 478 Connecting Christ and Culture (Pero) 

SST 465 Indigenous Christian Theologies in East Asia (Kang) 

Week Three Courses - July 5-9 

SSM 461 Preaching as a Celebrative Moment (Thomas) 

SSM 462 Re-imagining the Sermon: The Image as the Central Hermeneutic (Roloff) 

SSM 463 Preaching the Many Voices of Scripture (Long) 

SSM 464 Preaching on Controversial Issues (Bay) 

SSM 465 Preaching Sacramentally (Wilson-Kastner) 

SSM 466 Preaching the Gospel of John (Rhoads) 

SSM 467 Preaching to Congregations in Crisis (Thompson) 

SSW 42 1 Encountering the Religions of Asia (Wheelock) 

SSH 481 Religion and Democracy in the Liberal Tradition (Rowe) 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN PUBLIC MINISTRY 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools sponsors an eleven-week summer pro- 
gram in clinical pastoral education, offering a non-traditional CPE experience with 
focus on church and community. Applications must be completed by the preceding 
December 15. For more information contact the Rev. Frances C. McWilliams, MTS; 
Phone: 3 1 2-947-6300. Refer also to the description of this cooperative program on pages 
16-17 of this catalog. 

24 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY — SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Summer School of G-ETS offers a variety of courses for academic credit or con- 
tinuing education credit. Within the structure of two terms, courses are offered as one- 
week or two-week intensives. For further information, contact Doris Rudy; Phone 708- 
866-3942 or 708-866-3936. 

First Term 

22-501 Church and Society: Basic Analysis (Tholinl Scott) June 21 - July 2 

31-501 Developing and Preaching the Sermon (Chatfield) June 21 - July 2 

34/33-507 Leadership in the Local Church (Wingeier) June 21 - July 2 

21/22-503 Theological Ethics (Will) June 21 - July 2 

31-511 Christian Public Worship (Procter-Smith) June 21 - July 2 

11-511 Old Testament Interpretation (Werenski) June 21 - July 2 

40-674 United Methodist Studies: Wesley/19th Century (Brown) June 2 1 - July 2 

40-673 (in Korean) United Methodist Studies: 20th Century (Kim) June 21 - July 2 

33-612 Strategies and Resources for Youth Ministry (Otto) June 21 - July 2 

33-6^0 Media for Ministry and Mission (Mahan) June 21 - July 2 

SSI 1 Campus Ministry as Mission (Shockley) June 21-25 

551 2 Water into Wine: John's Gospel, the Old Testament, and Today's Preacher 

(Roth) June 21-25 

5513 Pastoral Connection: The Art of Pastoral Visitation (Phillips) June 2 1-25 

5514 Supervision for Ministry (Cassel) June 28 - July 2 

551 5 (DMin) Church as Koinonia: The Parish as a Learning Community 

(Seymour) June 28 - July 2 

551 6 (DMin) Soul and Money (Stevenson) June 28 - July 2 

Second Term 

33-506 Theological Education in the Parish (Seymour) July 5-16 

33-501 Teaching and Learning in the Church (L Vogel) July 5-16 

2 1 -500 Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology (Young) July 5- 1 6 

40-673 United Methodist Studies: 20th Century (KellerlTroxell) July 5-16 

5517 Church Music Workshop (Wren/D. VogeUKendrick/Bamhart) July 5-16 

5522 (DMin) Pastoral Leadership in the Congregation (Wingeier) July 5-9 

5523 (DMin) Stewardship as Practice of Justice and Peace (Will) July 5-16 

5524 The Arab/Israeli Conflict: From Origin to Outcome (Unman) July 5-9 

5525 Narrative Approaches to Christian Faith (Mahan) July 5-9 

5526 Relational Evangelism (Tuttle) July 5-9 

Growing a Church in the 90's: The Walnut Hills Story (Koth) July 12-16 

5528 (DMin) Growth and Empowerment of Persons through Living Narratives 

(Wimberly) ]u\y \2A6 

5529 (DMin) Financial Stewardship: A Paradigm of Discipleship (Waynick) 

July 12-16 

5530 Christian Heritage in the Holy Land (Vrman) July 12-16 

Travel/Study 

SS33 Reformation Heritage Tour (SteinfMayer) June 16-29 



25 



LSTC SUMMER GREEK PROGRAM 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago will offer intensive study of New Testament 
Greek in two three-week sequential courses: 

July 19 - August 6 

B-307 Biblical Greek I (Apel) M-F 8:30- 1 1 :30 

August 9-27 

B-308 Biblical Greek II (Apel) M-F 8:30- 1 1 :30 

For further information, contact Patricia Bartley, Registrar; Phone: 312-753-0717. 

NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY - Summer School Classes 

North Park offers four summer courses, each for three credit hours. For information, 
contact Stephen R. Graham, Registrar; Phone: 312-478-2696. 

May 24 - June 4, 1993, M-F 8:30-12 
HSTX-135 Theology of Luther (Anderson) 
BIBL- 1 6 1 First Corinthians (Scholer) 

May 24 - June 11, 1993, MWE 6:30-10 P.M. 
HSTX-272 Pentecostal & Charismatic Theology (Graham) 
MNST-272 Conflict Management (Carlson) 

Note: Classes will not meet on May 31, Memorial Day. 

NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY — Summer Classes 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary offers the following summer courses in the 
D.Min. program. For further information, contact Barbara Wixon; Phone: 708-620- 
2108. 

MN 656 Strategic Issues for Church Growth (LowelFreshour) June 7-11 M-F 9-4 
PC 605 Pastoral Counseling (Jennings) June 14-18 M-F 9-4 

TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL — Summer School 

TEDS offers a wide variety of courses for academic credit, varying in quarter hours for 
each course. A selected list from the almost seventy courses offered is given below. For 
further information, contact Barry Beitzel; Phone: 708-317-8084. 

Session I - June 21 - July 8, 1993 (No classes on Monday, July 5) 

NT746 Septuagint & NT (Moo) MTWTh 1-5:15 

OT503 Elementary Hebrew (Ortlund) MTWTh 1-5 

PC6 1 1 Psychology & Theology (Heard) MTWTh 1-3:45 

ST408 Theological French I (Devos) MTWTh 9- 1 2 

ST739 Theology of Worship/Prayer (Grudem) MTWTh 8:30-12 



26 



Session II - July 12-29, 1993 

NT610 Synoptic Gospels (Moo) MTWTh 1-4:15 

OT504 Elementary Hebrew II/Intro to Hebrew Exegesis (Ortlund) MTWTh 1-4:45 

OT73 1 Old Testament Theology (Sailhamer) MTWTh 1-3:30 

PR5 1 1 Apologetics (P. Feinberg) MTWTh 8:30- 1 1 :45 

ST405 Theological French II (Devos) MTWTh 9- 1 1 :45 

Session III - August 9-28, 1993 

NT401-2 Beginning Greek (Osborne) MTWThFSa8:30-12:15 

NT550 English Bible: Acts (Harris) TWTh 6:30-9:45 P.M. 

OT602 Hebrew Exegesis: Prophets (VanGemeren) MTWTh 8:30- 1 2 

OT845 Old Testament Bibliography (Sailhamer) MTSTh 1 -3 :30 

ST406 Theological German I (Kostenberger) MTWTh 9- 1 1 :45 

Session IV - August 30 - September 18, 1993 

NT402-3 Beginning Greek (Osborne) MTWThFSa 8:30- 12:30 
OT703 Hebrew Reading Skills (Sailhamer) MTWTh 1-4 
ST407 Theological German II (Kostenberger) MTWTh 9- 1 2 
ST7 1 5 Christian Ethics (Cameron) MTWTh 9- 1 1 :45 
ST845 Christians & Society (Cameron) MTWTh 1 -3 :45 

WOMEN, MINISTRY AND THE CITY — A Summer Study Action Program 
for Women in Ministry — June 14 - July 30, 1993 

This full time program offers a unique experience for women to work with women 
ministering in a variety of settings. The orientation, June 14-19, will set the framework 
for social analysis from the perspective of women from diverse cultural contexts, build 
community in large and small groups and provide acquaintance with Chicago's neigh- 
borhoods and systems. During the remaining six weeks, each participant will work at 
least twenty hours with a woman in ministry in a parish or agency setting with women. 
Two days a week, the program will focus on issues which women bring to the church, 
share community building, reflection and worship and visit ministries which provide 
shelter, support and empowerment for women. The program is sponsored by Women of 
Faith Resource Center, Institute of Pastoral Studies of Loyola University of Chicago, 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, McCormick Theological Seminary, Bethany 
Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, Chicago Theological 
Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, and others. For more information, 
contact Gretchen Leppke, Women of Faith Resource Center, 5249 N. Kenmore, 
Chicago, IL, 60640; Phone: 312-271-9855. 



27 



ACADEMIC CALENDARS 



All ACTS schools have three quarters of instruction each academic year, although 
they do not use a common calendar. BTS, CTU, CTS, LSTC, MTS, M/L and NBTS use 
calendars which closely parallel the calendar of the University of Chicago, and BTS and 
NBTS coordinate their calendars further. G-ETS and S-WTS follow a common calen- 
dar, which closely parallels the calendar of Northwestern University. Essential dates are 
given below. 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 

1993-94 



FALL 



September 13-24 


Fall Pre-Term 


September 30-October 3 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


October 4 


Classes Begin 


November 15-17 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 25-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


December 17 


Fall Quarter Ends 




WINTER 


January 3-14 


January Intensive 


January 24 


Regular Quarter Begins 


February 14-16 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 18 


Winter Quarter Ends 




SPRING 


March 28 


Spring Quarter Begins 


April 1 


Good Friday Recess 


May 9-13 


Pre-Registration for Summer Quarter 


May 30 


Memorial Day 


June 3 


Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

(BTS will 

be located 

in Richmond, 

Indiana.) 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION: 



1993-94 

September 8 
September 24 
September 27 
November 16-17 
November 25-28 
December 10 



FALL 

D.Min. Core Colloquium I Begins 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

September 7 

September 23 

September 26 

November 15-16 

November 24-27 

December 9 



January 3 
February 22-23 
March 18 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 



January 2 

February 21-22 

March 17 



March 28 
April 1-4 
May 17-18 
June 2 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Easter Recess 

Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 27 

April 14-17 

May 16-17 

June 1 



28 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1993-94 

September 27 
October 4 
November 15-19 
November 25-26 
December 17 



January 3 
February 21-25 
March 18 



March 28 
April 1 
May 16-20 
June 3 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

September 26 

October 3 

November 14-18 

November 24-25 

December 16 

January 3 

February 20-24 

March 17 

March 27 

April 14 

May 15-19 

June 2 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1993-94 



FALL 



1994-95 



September 22-23 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 21-22 


September 27 


Classes Begin 


September 26 


November 22-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 21-25 


November 16-17 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 15-16 


December 10 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 9 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 3 


March 1-2 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 28- March 1 


March 18 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 17 


March 28 


Classes Begin 


March 27 


March 31- Apr ill 


Good Friday Recess 


April 13-14 


June 2 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 1 


JTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO: 




1993-94 


FALL 


1994-95 


September 7 


Fall Pre-Term Begins 


September 6 


September 29-30 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 28-29 


October 4 


Classes Begin 


October 3 


November 17-18 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 16-17 


November 22-26 


Reading Week 


November 21-25 


December 17 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 16 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 3 


February 7-11 


Reading Week 


February 6-10 


February 23-24 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 22-23 


March 18 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 17 


March 28 - 


Classes Begin 


March 27 


April 1 


Good Friday Recess 


April 14 


June 2 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 1 



29 



McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 
1993-94 



1994-95 





FALL 




September 6-25 


Fall Pre-term 


September 5-24 


September 29-October 1 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 28-30 


October 4 


Classes Begin 


October 3 


November 17-18 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 16-17 


November 22-26 


Reading Week 


November 21-25 


November 25-28 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 24-27 


December 17 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 16 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 3 


January 17 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 16 


February 7-11 


Reading Week 


February 6-10 


February 23-24 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 22-23 


March 18 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 17 


March 28 


Classes Begin 


March 27 


April 1 


Good Friday Recess 


April 14 


May 9-June 3 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 8-June 2 


May 30 


Memorial Day 


May 29 


June 3 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 2 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL: 



1993-94 

September 27-29 
October 4 
November 25-28 
December 8-10 
December 18 

January 3 
March 9- 11 
March 19 

March 28 
June 11 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes Begin 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Registration for Winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

September 28 

October 3 

November 24-27 

December 7-9 

December 17 

January 3 

March 8-10 

March 18 

March 27 
June 10 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY: 
1993-94 

April 26-May 7 
September 7 
October 11-22 
November 12 

November 29 
December 18-January 2 
January 10-21 
February 18 

March 7 

March 30-April 5 
April 25-May 6 
May 20 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Christmas Recess 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

April 26-May 7 

September 6 

October 10-21 

November 1 1 

November 28 

TBA 

January 9-20 

February 17 

March 6 

April 5-12 

April 24-May 5 

May 19 



30 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1993-94 

September 9 
September 13 
October 18-22 
November 19 
November 29-December 17 

January 3 

January 31 -February 4 

March 11 



March 21 
April 1 
April 25-29 
May 20 



FALL 

Registration for Year* 
Classes Begin 
Reading Week 
Fall Quarter Ends 
Fall Mini-Term 

WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Reading Week 
Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Reading Week 
Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 

September 8 

September 12 

October 17-21 

November 18 

November 28-December 16 



January 2 

January 30-February 3 

March 10 



March 20 

April 14 

April 24-28 

May 19 



'Registration is accepted for adds, drops or changes through the first week of classes in each quarter. 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1993-94 

August 30- September 17 
September 29-October 1 
October 4 
November 15-19 
November 25-26 
December 18 

January 3-21 
January 17 
January 24 
February 14-18 
March 19 

March 28 
April 1 
May 16-20 
May 30 
June 3 



FALL 

Fall Pre -Term 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

"J" Term Intensives 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 
Regular Classes Begin 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Registration for Summer Term 
Memorial Day 
Spring Quarter Ends 



1994-95 



August 29-September 16 

September 28-30 

October 3 

November 14-18 

November 24-25 

December 17 

January 2-20 

January 16 

January 23 

February 13-17 

March 18 



March 27 

April 14 

May 15-19 

May 29 

June 2 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



1993-94 

September 23-24 
September 27 
November 16-17 
November 22-26 
December 10 



January 4 
January 27 
February 1 
March 1-2 
March 18 

March 28 
April 1-4 
May 16-20 
June 3 



1994-95 

September 22-23 

September 26 

November 15-16 

November 21-25 

December 9 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

January Term Classes Begin January 3 

January Term Classes End January 27 

Post-January Intensive Term Classes Begin January 3 1 

Registration for Spring Quarter February 28- March 1 

Post-January Intensive Term Ends March 1 7 

SPRING 

Classes Begin March 27 

Easter Recess April 14-17 

Reading Week May 15-19 

Spring Quarter Ends June 2 

31 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL: 

1993-94 1994-95 

FALL 

September 24, 27-28 Registration for Fall Quarter September 23, 26-27 

September 27 Classes Begin September 26 

November 25-29 Thanksgiving Recess November 24-28 

December 17 Fall Quarter Ends December 16 

WINTER 

January 3-4 Registration for Winter Quarter January 3-4 

January 3 Classes Begin January 3 

March 18 Winter Quarter Ends March 17 

SPRING 

March 28-29 Registration for Spring Quarter March 27-28 

March 28 Classes Begin March 27 

April 1-3 Easter Recess April 14-16 

June 10 Spring Quarter Ends June 9 



32 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 



In the section of "Course Descriptions" the courses of the ACTS schools are listed for 
each quarter according to an outline of major areas of study as follows: Biblical Studies, 
Historical Studies, Theological Studies, Ethical Studies, Religion and Society Studies, 
World Mission Studies, History of Religions and Ministry Studies. Further subdivisions 
are indicated within each area. In each unit of the outline, courses are listed in alpha- 
betical order of the offering institutions. 

Each course number is preceded by the initials of the institution by which it is offered, 
as follows: 

BTS Bethany Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

S-WTS Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 

SCUPE Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

An H suffix on a course number indicates that the course is taught in Spanish or 
bilingually in Spanish and English. If a course is taught in Spanish only, the course 
description is given in Spanish. A K suffix on a course number indicates that the course 
is taught in Korean. 

The standard abbreviations (M, T, W, Th, F, Sa) are used for days of the week. TBA is 
used to indicate that a professor or time for a course remains to be arranged (See note 
regarding updating course listings in the section on cross-registration below). 

EXPLANATIONS OF COURSE NUMBERS: 



BTS: 
Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

T - Theological Studies 

M - Ministry Studies 

I - Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

CTU: 
Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

C - Cross-Cultural Studies 

D - Doctrinal Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

- Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 
M - Ministry Studies 
P - Pastoral Studies 
S - Spirituality Studies 
W - Word and Worship Studies 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 -Introductory 
400-499 -Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory or foundational 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



33 



CTS: 
Fields of study: 

CH - Christian Heritage 
TEC - Theology, Ethics and 

Contemporary Culture 
CM - Christian Ministries 



Levels of courses: 
300-399 -Introductory 
400-499 -Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 
501-599 -Foundational courses 
601-699 -Advanced courses 



G-ETS: 
Fields of study: 

1 1 - Old Testament 

1 2 - New Testament 

13 - Church History 

21 - Theology 

22 - Ethics and Society 

3 1 - Preaching, Worship and Church Music 

32 - Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 

33 - Christian Education 

34 - Church Administration, Evangelism, and Spiritual Formation 
40 - Interdisciplinary 



LSTC: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

T - Theological Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

W - World Mission Studies 

M - Ministry Studies 

I - Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 



Levels of courses: 
300-399 -Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



MTS: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

T - Theological Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

W - World Mission Studies 

M - Ministry Studies 

I - Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 -Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



M/L: 
Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 




H - 


Historical Studies 




T - 

E . 


Theological Studies 
Ethical Studies 




W - 


World Mission Studies 




HR- 
M - 
I - 


History of Religions 
Ministry Studies 
Interdisciplinary/Integrative 


Studies 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 -Introductory 
400-499 -Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



34 



MS: 
Fields of study: 

BI - Sacred Scripture 
SY - Systematic Theology 
MO- Christian Life 
HI ' Church History 
MS - Ministerial Sciences 



Levels of courses: 

200-299 -Required 

300-399 -Intermediate/Elective 

400-499 -Advanced, requiring research 



NPTS: 
Fields of study: 

BIBL - Biblical Field 
HIST - Historical Field 
THEO - Theological Field 
MNST - Ministry Field 



Levels of courses: 

100-199 -Core or introductory courses 
200-299 -Elective or intermediate courses 
300-399 -Seminar courses 



NBTS: 
Fields of study: 


Levels of courses: 


BL 


- Biblical Languages 


300-399 -Introductory 


BS 


- Biblical Studies 


400-499 -Intermediate 


CH 


- Church History 


500-599 -Advanced 


CN 


- Counseling 


600-699 -D.Min. 


CT 


- Context 




DR 


- Doctoral 




ED 


- Christian Education 




FE 


- Field Education 




IN 


- Integrative/Interdisciplinary 




ME 


- Missions and Evangelism 




MN 


- Pastoral/Parish Ministry 




NT 


- New Testament Studies 




OT 


- Old Testament Studies 




PC 


- Pastoral Care 




RS 


- Religion and Society 




TH 


- Theological Studies 




UR 


- Urban Ministry 




S-WTS: 






Fields of study: 


Levels of courses: 


01 - 


Old Testament 


500-599 -Introductory 


02 - 


New Testament 


600-699 - Intermediate; prerequisites or 


03 - 


Church History 


permission of instructor 


05 - 


Theology 


required 


06 - 


Spirituality 


700-799 -Advanced; permission of 


08 - 


Ethics and Society 


instructor required for 


09 - 


Liturgies 


non-doctoral students 


10 - 


Church and Society 




11 - 


Church Music 




12 - 


Pastoral Care 




13 - 


Church Administration and the Small Church 


14 - 


Christian Education 




15 - 


Practica 




16 - 


Theological Bibliography 




17 - 


Preaching 





35 



Levels of courses: 

500-599 - Introductory courses 
600-699 - Intermediate courses 
700-799 - Advanced level courses 
800-849 - Mainly Th.M. and 

Doctoral level courses 
850-999 - Doctoral level only 



TEDS: 
Fields of study: 

OT - Old Testament and Semitic Studies 

NT - New Testament Studies 

CH - Church History and the History of 

Christian Thought 
ME - Mission and Evangelism 
ST - Biblical and Systematic Theology 
PR - Philosophy of Religion 
CE - Christian Education 
PC - Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
H - Horn ile tics 
PT - Pastoral Theology 

HOW CROSS-REGISTRATION WORKS 

Students of any of the ACTS schools may take courses from any of the other member 
schools directly and with no added charges. Cross-registration into courses of the C.P.E. 
Program of the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools, Seminary Consortium for 
Urban Pastoral Education or Spertus College of Judaica (see pp. 16-20) may involve dif- 
fering procedures and payment in each school; students are responsible to determine 
what particulars apply at their own schools. 

Exceptions to the process of cross-registration exist a) during the summer quarter 
when tuition is normally paid to the school offering the course; b) for D.Min. courses 
other than Pastoral Care and Counseling; c) in certain courses with limited enrollment. 
Each school in ACTS reserves the right to limit enrollment in certain courses for peda- 
gogical reasons and to set its own policies for the admission of students from other 
schools to such courses. 

A student who cross-registers is subject to the policy for incompletes at the school 
into which he/she cross-registers. 

It should be noted that, although the following listings were accurate when published, 
each school issues a list of changes and corrections just prior to registration for each 
quarter. These lists should be consulted through the Registrar of each school. 



36 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FALL 1993 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTU B 490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

The attitude of the biblical communities to the 
non-biblical world will be investigated for direc- 
tion in the global mission of the contemporary 
church. Material from both of the Testaments will 
be studied. 
Lenchak MW 1041:15 Fall 

CTU I 435 

Biblical and Ethical Aspects of Ecology 

(For course description, see Religion and Society 

Studies.) 

Bergant/WadeU MW 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC B-333 

The Bible: Its Message and Content 

The course is intended for students needing a basic 
introduction to the Bible and its content. Reading 
of the Bible will be supplemented with information 
on biblical times, geography, and history. 
Dicicco Th 7-9 :50 p.m . Foil 

MTS B-300 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

An overview of content and approaches to scrip- 
ture that are responsible to church and academy. 
Students work each week with texts from both the 
Old Testament and New Testament. Special atten- 
tion given to literary types, historical contexts, 
methodologies and resources for understanding. 
Bding/Tanzer TTh 104 1 :50 Foil 

MTS B-300 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

(For course description see B-300 above. Hispanic 

emphasis: bilingual support.) 

Vena TK 6-9 P.M. Fall 

S-WTS 01/02-503S 
Introduction to Biblical Languages 

The course is designed to provide a very basic 
understanding of biblical Greek and biblical 
Hebrew. They will be located within their language 
families so that the elementary structure of the lan- 
guages can best be illumined. The alphabets, some 



vocabulary, and other appropriate exegetical tools 

will also be studied. 

TBA MTWTh 3-3:50 Fall 



OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-323 

Understanding the Hebrew Bible 

(Old Testament) 

The goal of this course is to provide the student 
with an introduction to the history and literature 
of ancient Israel. The student will read an intro- 
duction to the Hebrew Bible and history of ancient 
Israel. The class periods will focus on issues and 
data not easily available in the reading. 
TBA TBA Foil 

CTS CH 301 

People and Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
problems of the critical and theological interpreta- 
tion of the Old Testament against the background 
of the development of historical methods of bibli- 
cal study. 
LaCocque W9-12-.40 Fall 

G-ETS 11-511 

Old Testament Interpretation 

A comprehensive introduction to the legal, histori- 
cal, poetic and prophetic books of the Hebrew 
scriptures, with emphasis on the order and con- 
tents, cultural settings, literary forms, religious 
themes, and on interpretive approaches. Lecture 
course with Bible knowledge tests, papers, and 
examinations. Limit: 45. 

Nash WF 9-10:50 Fall 

Bird Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTh 7-9:20 P.M. Winter 

LSTCB-310 

Pentateuch and Historical Books 

Literary, historical, and theological studies in these 
books of the Old Testament. Designed to be the 
introductory course in the field. 
Fuerst MTh 10:45-12 Fall 

Klein MTK 10:45-12 Fall 

NBTS OT 301 

The Pentateuch 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and the- 



37 



Old Testament 



ological study of the Pentateuch. Special attention 

will be given to the major themes of the 

Pentateuch. 

Mariotdni T 7-9:45 P.M. Fall 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B 400 
Pentateuch 

A study of the literary origins and development of 
the traditions and themes of the Pentateuch in 
light of their importance for ancient Israel's theolo- 
gy. Attention will be given to questions of interpre- 
tation. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Bergant MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU B 415 

Later Prophecy: Jeremiah 

After investigating the origins of prophecy with 
the prophetic bands and touching upon Amos and 
Hosea, we concentrate upon the book of Jeremiah. 
This course explores Jeremiah's prophecy against 
its historical framework along with the literary 
character of the book to discover its theological 
content. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Lenchak W 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

G-ETS 11-601 
Pentateuch: Joseph Story 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in the five books of the Torah (The Law, 
Genesis- Deuteronomy). Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. Examples of top- 
ics: the Primeval Story (Gen 1-11), The Exodus 
Narrative (Ex 1-15), Covenant in Genesis- 
Deuteronomy, The Deuteronomic Code. Limit: 15. 
Roth. F9-I2 Fall 

G-ETS 11-603 

Prophetic Books: Jeremiah 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Jeremiah. Emphasis on analytical and 
synthetic interpretive skills. Limit: 15. 
Nash TTh 1-30-3 .20 Fall 

NPTS BlBL-237 
Preaching from Jeremiah 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies V.) 
KopwklNorin M 2-5 Fail 



S-WTS01-606S 

Studies in Israelite Wisdom and Hymnody: 

The Psalms of Israel 

This introduction to the Psalms will have a dual 
focus. There will be an examination of Psalm cate- 
gories, their possible settings and uses, and of the 
Old Testament traditions seen in the Psalms. There 
will also be a consideration of the use of the Psalms 
in public worship and private devotions. 
Deeley TTK 9-10:50 Fall 

TEDS OT550 

English Bible: Ezra-Nehemiah-Esther 

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method 
and treatment of the special teaching of Ezra, 
Nehemiah and Esther, based on the English text. 
Howard T 7-9:45 P.M. Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B-324 

Exegesis in Hebrew Bible: Genesis and Esther 

This course will use a study of Genesis and Esther 
to teach historical and literary exegetical method- 
ology. Some of the class will be in a workshop for- 
mat to assist students in working with an individu- 
al text. The class will also use developing exegeti- 
cal skills with the narative of Esther. 
Roop TBA Fall 

CTS CH 406 
Genesis 1 -4 in Focus 

An investigation of the early chapters of Genesis, 
vertex of biblical anthropology. The universe as 
context; vocation as foundation of being: sameness 
and difference; sexes and races; humans and ani- 
mals; image and representation; pregnancy, travail 
and toil; sin and curse; "fall"?. . . And now? 



LaCocque 



T2-5 



FaU 



LSTCB-421 

From Adam and Eve to Abraham and Sarah 

A detailed study of the stories of Genesis 1-12 in 
their Ancient Near Eastern setting, with attention 
to their meaning also for today. 
Michel W 7-9:50 P.M. Fall 



38 



Old Testament 



LSTC B-620 

Graduate Biblical Seminar I: The Pentateuch 

An ongoing seminar on the Pentateuchal materi- 
als. Theme for 1993: Deuteronomy and the 
Deuteronomists. Thorough exegetical study of 
selected texts. (For post M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Fuerst M 12:30-3:45 Foil 

MTSB-451 

Biblical Interpretation from an Afro-Centric 

Perspective 

1) Approaching the interpretation of Scripture 
from an Afro-Centric perspective. 2) A review of 
resources and literature using the above-named 
perspective with particular attention to the indi- 
vidual Psalms of lament as tools for dealing with 
socio-economic oppression. 
Grcmsum F 9-1 1 :50 Foil 



TEDS OT 845 

Puritan Old Testament Exposition 

A study of the sources, hermeneutics, commen- 
taries and sermons of selected Puritans on Old 
Testament texts. 
Orthtnd TBA Fall 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 



LSTC B-300B 

Biblical Hebrew I 

An introduction to the grammar of Hebrew, 
designed to equip students to use the language in 
exegetical work. Credit is given for this course 
alone, but the grammar cycle is completed in 
Biblical Hebrew II. 

Knappe MW 1-2:50 Fall 

Michel MW 1-2:50 Fall 



MSBI331 

Wisdom Literature (OT) 

This course examines the growth of the wisdom lit- 
erature in the Ancient Near East, with emphasis 
upon its appearance and literature in Israel, in rela- 
tion to its Mesopotamian and Egyptian counter- 
parts. The influence of wisdom thought and motifs 
within the New Testament are also examined. The 
course concludes with a brief look at the wisdom 
traditions of the Far East, in particular that of 
Buddhism, and the possibilities of a "wisdom 
bridge" as a basis of dialogue between Christianity 
and Far Eastern religions. 
MclUvme MTh 1:15-2-30 FaR 

NPTS BIBL-221 
Exile and Hope 

How does a faith community survive a devastation 
that appears to invalidate core affirmations of 
faith? A study of Isaiah 40-66, Haggai-Zechariah 
and Ezra-Nehemiah provides us an opportunity to 
reflect on the varied views expressed by leaders 
who are seeking future for their community. Prereq: 
BIBL-120andBIBL-121. 
Holmgren W 2-5 FaR 

NPTS BIBL-241 

Jews, Christians, and the Bible 

In an attempt to combine practical and academic 

approaches, class members visit synagogues, meet 

Jewish and Christian leaders, as well as pursue the 

traditional classroom activity of lecture and film 

presentations. 

Holmgren M 7-10 P.M. Foil 



MTSB-32 1/322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I, II 

A non-divisible two-quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected 
portions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. 
Attention will be given to fundamentals of text 
criticism and general principles of biblical interpre- 
tation. Double course. 

Summers Intensive Sept. 6-25 FaR Pre-Term 

Tamer Sec. 1 TWTh 8:45 -9:50 Fall 

Boling Sec. 2 MW 2-3:50 Fall 

MSBI301 
Hebrew 1 

The course is a careful study of the grammar and 
syntax of the Hebrew language with emphasis on 
the historical evolution of the language and the 
new insights offered by Ugaritic and Phoenician. 
Lodge MTh 9:55-11:15 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-102 
Intermediate Hebrew 

To assist students in developing a greater facility 
with the Hebrew language, varied texts from the 
Hebrew Bible are selected for reading and discus- 
sion. Prereq: BIBL-100 and BIBL-101. 1 hour cred- 
it. 
HaR TBA Fall 



NBTSBL301LH 
Hebreo I/Hebrew 1 

This course is the first quarter of a sequence of two 



39 



New Testament 



quarters which attempts to teach Hebrew grammar 
and vocabulary and develop translation skills so 
that the student can read the Hebrew Bible with 
the help of reference tools. Taught bilingually in 
Spanish and English. 
Homing TTh 1-2:20 Foil 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 



CTU B 305 

New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament in their histor- 
ical, cultural, religious, and social context. 
Introduction to the methodological tools employed 
in New Testament research and to the diverse the- 
ologies that comprise the New Testament witness 
to Jesus of Nazareth. 

Reid (A) MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

TBA (B)M 7-9:30 p.m. Fall 

TBA UW 1 1 -.30-12:45 Winter 

LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the gen- 
uine Pauline epistles as well as the Deutero-Pauline 
writings, placing them within their historical set- 
tings. Basic theological and ethical themes of Paul 
will be investigated. 
Krentz MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

+ disc, sec: Th 9-9:50 or TBA 
Rhoads MW 8:30-9:45 Foil 

+ disc, sec: Th 9-9:50 or TBA 

NPTSB1BL-1U 
Introduction to Greek Exegesis 
Attention will be given to the procedures and tools 
used in the exegetical process, textual criticism, 
translation, New Testament Greek syntax, theolog- 
ical implications and application to ministry. 
Experience will be gained through the exegesis of a 
New Testament book. Prereq: Greek. Four hours. 
Bellevile MWTh 10:154 1 :30 Foil 

NBTS NT 301 
Matthew, Mark, and Luke 

This course is a general introduction to the three 
Synoptic Gospels. It examines the issues of their 
sources and interrelationships. It also focuses on 
the themes they share in common and on each 



one's distinctive contribution as a witness to the 

life and teachings of Jesus. 

Cosgrove M 6 :30-9: 15 P.M. Fall 

S-WTS 02-501GS 

New Testament Interpretation I: Gospels/Acts 
Designed for the student with no previous work in 
Bible: focused on the principles of exegesis with 
examination of selected passages in the light of 
textual, literary, form criticism, and redaction criti- 
cism. Attention will be given to first century 
Judaism and basic information about major New 
Testament books. 
TBA MW 1-2:50 Fall 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-434 

Paul and the Corinthians 

A study of selected texts from the Corinthian cor- 
respondence, texts that illustrate the development 
of early Chistianity, illumine the faith and ministry 
of the apostle Paul, and address recurring issues in 
the formation of community in Christ. 
Gardner Sept. 13-24, M-F 8-11 Fall 

CTU B 432 

The Gospel According tc Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its 
structure, major themes and key theological motifs, 
especially the link between the Passion of Jesus and 
Christian discipleship. Prereg: B 305 or equiv. 
Reid T 7-9:30 P.M. Foil 

CTU B 452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

A study of the life and thought of Paul in his cul- 
tural and theological setting. Pauline motifs such as 
law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death and 
resurrection, church and apostleship will be exam- 
ined in selected letters, with a view to their mes- 
sage for the contemporary church. Prereq: B 305 or 
equiv. 
TBA TTK 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTS CH 424 

The Theology of John 

An exegetical study of the Gospel of John with the 
intent of seeing Christian reality from the point of 
view of an author of the fourth gospel. Special 
emphasis is placed on its particular style. 
Snyder M9-12-.40 Fall 



40 



New Testament 



G-ETS 12-602 

The Gospel of Matthew 

Critical interpretation of Matthew, focusing on the 
forms and uses of the Jesus-tradition, literary rela- 
tions to Mark, and theology and purposes of the 
evangelist. Attention to the Sermon on the 
Mount and Jewish background of the Gospel. 
Prereq: 12-501. 
Stegner TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

LSTC B-540 

Social Study of the Gospel of Mark 

What does Social Criticism (Social Description, 
Sociology of Knowledge, and Cultural Anthropol- 
ogy) teach us about the world inside Mark's Gospel 
story (cosmology, society, anthropology, healing, 
exorcisms, purity and pollution, kinship, hospitali- 
ty, etc.)? 
Rhoads W 7-9:50 P.M. Fall 

MTSB-401K 

The Gospel of John (Taught in Korean) 

An exegesis and discussion of the Gospel with 
emphasis on structure, historical background and 
its uniqueness in comparison with the Synoptic 
Gospels. Study and discussion of some critical and 
theological issues in the Gospel. Reflection on the- 
ological and ministerial possibilities. 
C.H. Park Intensive Dec. 27-31 FaU Post-Term 

MTS B-403K 

The Epistles of Paul (Taught in Korean) 

An introduction to the context and content of the 
Pauline letters. The basic themes of the letters in 
relation to their Graeco-Roman context will be 
examined. The relation and meaning of these 
themes for the church's life today will be discussed. 
C.H. Park Intensive Sept. B- 17 Fall Pre-Term 

NPTSB1BL-158 
Acts 

This course is an examination of how the early 
church went about fulfilling its evangelistic man- 
date. Analysis will include the relationship of 
Christianity to Judaism, the nature of the gospel 
message, missionary strategy, the life of the early 
church, internal tensions and their resolution, and 
whether Acts provides a model for the church 
today. 
BeUeviUe W 2-5 Foil 



NPTS BIBL-165 
Ephesians 

The analysis of this letter focuses on its teaching 
about salvation, life in Christ, and the Church. 
The relation of Ephesians to Colossians is also con- 
sidered. 
Snodgrass M 7- 10 P.M. Fall 

S-WTS 02-61 4S 

The Gospel According to Saint Matthew 

A study of Matthew in its original setting with par- 
ticular attention to wisdom, Christology, the rela- 
tion of this gospel to church orders and the emer- 
gent literature of so-called Jewish Christianity. The 
basic methods of gospel study will be put into prac- 
tice in regular section discussions. 
Pervo TTh 1-2:50 Foil 

TEDS NT 706 
Romans 

Stress on the theology of Paul, with consideration 
of the distinctive emphases of the epistle: Paul's 
teaching on Judaism, salvation history, the power 
of sin, righteousness, the Holy Spirit and the future 
of Israel. Prereq: reading knowledge of Greek. 
Moo TBA Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 465 

Liturgy of the Synagogue 1 

An overview of the worship forms in the contempo- 
rary American synagogue with special reference to 
the common thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominations: Orthodox, Conservative and 
Reform, and to historical backgrounds. (This course 
is sponsored by the Jewish Chatauqua Society.) 
Perelmuter TTh 10-11:15 FaU 

CTU B 525 

Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus* Jewish Background 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding of 
the relationship of early Christianity to Rabbinic 
Judaism and to develop a capacity to interpret 
Jewish sources from Talmud and Midrash, this 
course will serve as an opportunity to examine the 
nature of Rabbinic Judaism through an exploration 
of pertinent Jewish sources. 
Perelmuter MW 2:30-3:45 FaU 



41 



New Testament 



CTUB571 

Early Christian Letters 

A seminar on the letter genre in early Christianity 
as a means for maintaining unity, establishing 
ecclesiastical policy, conveying theological posi- 
tions and settling internal disputes. Foci: Pastorals 
and general epistles, Johannine letters, Letters to 
Seven Churches of Apocalypse, 1 Clement, Letters 
of Ignatius of Antioch and other first and second 
century representative letters. 
Bowe T 1-3-30 Fall 

CTSCH431 

Healing in the New Testament 

An examination of the presuppossitions and prac- 
tices for health and wellness in the first Christian 
community. The procedures will be examined in 
light of the several social matrices. 
Snyder T 942:40 Foil 

LSTC B-650 

Graduate Biblical Seminar IV: The Gospels 

An on-going seminar on the gospel materials. 
Theme for 1993: The Synoptic Problem. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by consent of 
instructor.) 



Linss 



T 1-4:30 



Foil 



NPTS B1BL-254 
The Parables of Jesus 

This course analyzes methods of interpreting the 
parables and provides understanding of the teach- 
ing of Jesus expressed in them. Explicit attention 
will be given to preaching from the parables. 
Snodgrass Th 25 FaR 

SCUPEB-TH301 

The Corinthian Church: 

A Biblical Approach to Urban Culture 

Paul's letters to the Corinthian church become the 
text of this course, which examines Paul's concept 
of ministry and models of ministry in a pluralistic 
urban setting. Special attention will be given to 
issues that still cause rifts in modern urban church- 
es, such as the role of women, spiritual gifts and 
how to proclaim the gospel to racially, ethnically or 
socially diverse groups. 4 hours. Fees may apply; 
seep. 19. 
Scou TKa.m. Fall 

TEDS NT 762 
Johannine Theology 

Seminar in the theology of the Johannine litera- 



ture, including critical contributions of the biblical 
authors and the issue of unity and diversity within 
the canon of the New Testament. 
Carson TBA Fall 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTSB-316 

New Testament Greek I 

An introducation to the vocabulary and grammar 

of the Greek New Testament, designed to develop 

the basic skills needed to translate New Testament 

texts. 

TBA TBA Fall 

CTU B 320 
Biblical Greek I 

A basic introduction to the grammar and vocabu- 
lary of the Greek New Testament designed as the 
first course in a three-quarter sequence with B 321 
Biblical Greek II and B 441 Gospel of John from 
the Greek Text. 
Bowe TWTh 8:30-9:30 Fall 

G-ETS 12-641 
Elementary Greek 1 

Essential forms and principles of New Testament 
Greek, Two units; credit for 12-641 after satisfacto- 
ry completion of 12-642. 
Stegner TWThF 8-8:50 Foil 

LSTC B-307 
Biblical Greek 1 

An introduction to Greek, designed to equip stu- 
dents to use the language in exegetical work. 
Students are encouraged to complete the Greek 
sequence with B-308 Biblical Greek II or another 
appropriate language course. 
Krentz MW J -2:30; Th I -2 Fall 

Rochelle MW 1 -2:30; Th 1 -2 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-098 

Beginning New Testament Greek 1 

An inductive approach to the Greek language is 
used which de-emphasizes memorization. Focus is on 
basic grammar, vocabulary and the development of 
reading skills. First of a two-term course. 
Kauer MTWTh 2:30-3:20 Fall 

NPTSBIBL-112 

New Testament Greek Readings 

To increase the facility of students in reading 



42 



Historical Studies 



Greek, various passages from the New Testament 
will be translated. Prereq: Greek, Pass-Fail. One 
hour credit. 
Belleville TBA Foil 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-346 

History of Christianity I 

An overview of Christian history from the apos- 
tolic period to the Reformation. Topics include the 
presuppositions of Christian history, the early 
church and Roman culture, the Constantinian 
church, the Augustinian synthesis, the conversion 
of Europe, monastic orders, and Eastern 
Orthodoxy. 
Wagner TTh 9:30-1 0:50 Fall 

CTS CH 344 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

From the early church to late medieval period. A 

survey of significant theological movements, with 

attention to their social context. To be followed in 

Winter by CH 345 History of Christian Thought 

II. 

Stebner M 6:30-9:30 P.M. Fall 



women of the early and medieval periods. 

Hendel MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Nelson M 6:30-9:30 P.M. Fall 

MTS H-300 

Transformations of Christianity: 

A Foundational Course 

This fundamental course surveys the history of 
Christianity by exploring the formation and devel- 
opment of its major epochs: early; medieval and 
Reformation; modern. Theological paradigms and 
renewal movements will be placed in historical 
context. A narrative text, primary documents and 
critical essays will constitute the reading. 
Souryer M 6-9 P.M. Fall 

Rodriguez-Diaz MW 10-11 :50 Spring 

NPTSH1ST-U0 

Christian Heritage I: 

The Early Medieval Church 

A basic introduction is provided by this course to 
the history of the Christian church from apos- 
tolic times through the Middle Ages, with 
emphasis on the expansion of the church, per- 
sons, institutional growth and theological devel- 
opment. Four hours. 
P. Anderson MWTh 8-9:15 Fall 



G-ETS 13-501 
History of Christianity 1 

A survey of the life, thought, and development of 
Christianity from the post-Apostolic period to the 
Great Schism (a.D. 1054). Limit: 35. 
Groh TTh 940:50 Fall 

Groh MW 5:40-7-30 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 13-503 

History of Christianity 111 

Key events, people, and concepts in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries with attention to theologi- 
cal, ethical and institutional formulations and power 
structures, as well as to contributions of the Black 
church, women, and Third World Christians. 
(Discussion section required.) Limit: 35. 
Murphy T 6-9 P.M. Foil 

Murphy TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCH-310 

Early and Medieval Church History 

A basic introduction to Christian history and the- 
ology until the Reformation. Lectures and 
discussions of primary sources by both men and 



NBTSCH301 
Martyrs to Inquisitors 

This course is an introductory survey of the devel- 
opment of Christianity from the second century of 
the common era through the fifteenth century, i.e., 
from the end of the New Testament period to the 
dawn of the Reformation. 
Rodgerson Pleasants TTh 1-2:20 Fall 

S-WTS03-501S 

General Church History 1: 

The Early Church (100-600) 

A survey of church history from the time of the 
Apostolic Fathers to that of St. Gregory the Great 
with emphasis upon the development of ecclesial 
and theological traditions. 
Pervo WF 9-10:50 Fall 

S-WTS 03-502S 

General Church History 11: 

The Medieval Church (600-1500) 

A survey of the life and thought of the Christian 

church from Gregory the Great to the Renaissance. 

Barker WF 9-10:50 Foil 



43 



Historical Studies 
II 



HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 



MTS H-416K 

The History of the Korean Church 

from 1884 to 1988 (Taught in Korean) 

The Korean Church has a very brief history. Many 
different Christian theologies, traditional Korean 
religions, social and cultural forces have all helped 
to shape the church. This course will explore the 
unique character of the Korean Church because of 
these many influences. 
Lee M 6-9 P.M. Fall 

M/LH395 

Unitarian Universalist History and Polity 
An introduction to Unitarian Universalist history 
focused toward preparing ministers to help congre- 
gations become aware of the heritage of liberal reli- 
gion. The course will include introductions to 
Polish, Transylvanian, and English Unitarianism 
and Universalism, followed by a major focus on 
American and Canadian Unitarianism and 
Universalism, with some attention to the role of 
congregational polity in those two movements. 
Participants must register in the Fall Quarter in 
order to receive reading assignments which are to 
be studied prior to the week of the class. 
Godbey/Staff Required Registration Fall 

GodbeyiStaff Jan. 17-21 9-5 Winter 

MSSY351 

Introduction of Eastern Christianity 

This course provides an overview to the history, 
liturgy, and theology which are characteristic of 
Eastern Christianity. The differences between 
Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholics will be 
discussed with a new view toward highlighting the 
issues that are part of the ecumenical dialogue 
between East and West. 
McDonnell MTh 9:55-1 1:15 Foil 

NBTS CH 461 
Denominational Heritage 

This course is intended to meet the requirements 
of denominational heritage for non-Baptists. 
Readings and assignments will be individually tai- 
lored for each student. Class sessions will vary 
according to the configuration of the students each 
term. Prereq: CH 302 or CH 303 or permission of 
the instructor. 
Dayton M 9 -304 2: 15 Fall 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

G-ETS 13-608 

Life and Work of Martin Luther 

Introduction to Luther's life and theological con- 
tribution through study of his sermons, treatises, 
and letters. Limit: 15. 
Stein TTK 9-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 13-609 

Life and Work of John Calvin 

Calvin's life, ministry, and theological contribu- 
tions as portrayed in his major writings. Limit: 15. 
Stein Th 6-9 P.M. Fall 

LSTCH-612 

Luther and Social Reform 

A seminar which focuses on the theological and 
practical aspects of Luther's social thought. 
Readings and discussions of primary sources dealing 
with such issues as the care of the poor, education, 
authority, marriage, and war. (For post-M.Div. stu- 
dents. Admission of others by consent of instruc- 
tor.) 
Hendel M J -3:30 Fall 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTUH416 

The American Catholic Experience 

The main problems and solutions of the American 
Catholic community: immigration, acculturation, 
education, social questions, anti-Catholicism, the- 
ology and discipline before and after Vatican II. 
Limit: 10. 
Ross MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

MS H1366 

American Catholicism: Civil War to Vatican II 

(1865-1965) 

The Catholic Church in the United States grew 
dramatically in the post-Civil War years. The pas- 
toral challenge of caring for millions of immigrants, 
the challenges of the industrial society, the 
Catholic response to social issues, and develop- 
ments within the Church are the major themes for 
examining the history of the American Catholic 
Church from the end of the Civil War to the end 
of Vatican II. 
ZieUnsld MTh 1:15-2:30 Fall 



44 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



NPTS H1ST-250 

Church and American Society 

The course traces the development of the church 
in the American scene. Themes handled: European 
background, The Great Awakening, religious free- 
dom, revivalism and social reform, denomination- 
alism, Americanism and civil religion, theological 
controversies and the ecumenical movement. 
Graham MW 1:40-3-30 FaR 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTU CH325 

Models of Missionary Activity 

A survey is made of the variety of forms that mis- 
sionary activity has taken in the Church's history 
from the Apologists in the Roman Empire to the 
classical image of the nineteenth-century mission- 
ary. This study focuses on the historical context 
and underlying issues that determined each mis- 
sionary model. 
Schroeder MW 10-11:15 FaR 

G-ETS 13*641 

African-American Religious History: 

Journey of Faith and Freedom II 

Continuation of Part 1, with focus on post-Civil 
War developments; incorporates field experience 
in black churches. 
Murphy Th 6-9 P.M. FaR 

TEDS CH 742 
Patristic Age 

Introduction to Christian life and thought between 
the close of the New Testament canon and the 
beginnings of the medieval period under Pope 
Gregory I (ca. A.D. 600) with emphasis on the 
major church fathers through primary and relevant 
secondary sources. 
Neuks TBA Fall 

TEDS CH 772 

Cults and New Religions 

History of Protestant-related sects and cults 

emphasizing how the failures of the organized 

church have led to cult organization and how 

orthodox churches can best present the historical 

Christian faith to adherents of these sects and 

cults. ^ 

Tucker TBA FaR 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 



BTS T-478 
Narrative Theology 

Drawing upon narrative theology writings and 
approaches, this course explores ways the story of 
God's presence in and through the life of Jesus 
Christ intersects with and illuminates our every- 
day experience. Each student presents several con- 
structive statements of belief in narrative style for 
class review and discussion. 



Groff 



TTh 8-9:20 



Fall 



CTU D 325 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources and meth- 
ods of theology worked out from a study of several 
case-histories. Special emphasis on the historical 
revelation in Christianity and the developing 
awareness of the faith-community in relation to 
shifting horizons. 

Hayes MW 1041:15 Fall 

Urman M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTS CH 344 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

(For course description, see Historical Studies I.) 
Stebner M 6:30-9:30 P.M. Fall 

CTS TEC-500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theological 
interpretation aiming at developing skills in relat- 
ing theological perspectives to the concrete human 
situation. Non-CTS, permission of instructor 
required. 
Jennings M 9-12:40 Fall 

G-ETS 21-500 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary 

Theology 

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of sys- 
tematic theology in a pluralistic world. Factors 



45 



Theological Studies 

affecting the Euro American context will be exam- 
ined in relation to African, Asian and Latin 
American contexts. Philosophical and cultural 
developments affecting theological methods will be 
examined to prepare for the study of systematic 
theology and theological ethics. Limit: 30. 
D.Vogel TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

D.Vogel WF 940:50 Spring 

G-ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology 1 

The meaning and methods of systematic theology; 
Christian understanding of God, Trinity, creation, 
persons, and history and eschatology. Prereq: three 
foundational courses in Bible and history. Limit: 30. 
Young TTh 1:30-3:20 FaR 

WW Jan. 24-Uar. 18 Winter 

W 9-10:50; F 94 1:50 

LSTCT-301 
Unity and Diversity 

This double course exposes students to classic theo- 
logical statements in Catholic Christianity and in 
the Lutheran tradition. It also addresses the global 
and multicultural mission of the church and how 
Christian/Lutheran identity is defined by this con- 
text. How is the gospel contextualized in ministeri- 
al situations? Finally, it provides orientation to the- 
ological education in view of the faith heritage and 
the current missiological challenges. 
WestheUe/Vogelaar Sept. 7-24 FallPre-Term 

SchweikerfPero Sept. 7-24 FaUPre-Term 

M-F 8:30-1 1:30; 
plus a weekend plunge and 
colloquies during the FaR Quarter 

LSTCT-311 
Christian Theology 1 

The first of a three-course sequence providing a 
survey of the basic doctrines of the Christian faith, 
taking into account biblical origins, historical 
developments, and contemporary significance. 
Emphasis on helping students develop their own 
theological perspectives. Topics in first term 
include the doctrines relating to the First Article of 
the Creed. 

Pero MTh 10:45-12 FaR 

Hefner MTh 10:4542 + disc. sec. Th 1-1:50 FaR 

MTS/LSTCI-311H 

Orientacion a la Investigacion Bibliografica 

Teologica (Orientation to Theological 

Bibliographical Research) 

Este curso se propone dar al estudiante un 



conocimiento sistematico de las tecnicas de inves- 
tigacion indispensables para el desempeno de la 
educacion teologica. Por medio del estudio de 
aspectos teoricos de la investigacion y de la practi- 
ca de diversos ejercicios asignados el estudiante 
podra adquirir un sistema para elaborar trabajos de 
investigacion en otros cursos ofrecidos en el semi- 
nario. 
Wallace F 94 1.50 Foil 

MTS 1-478 

Seminar on Research Methods 

Designed for M.A.T.S. and M.Div. students, this 
seminar teaches both the "how-to" of effective 
argumentation and examines, criticizes and models 
selected methodologies from the biblical, histori- 
cal, theological and ministries fields. The course 
project is a research proposal, developed and care- 
fully refined throughout the seminar. Limit: 15. 
Prereq: preliminary coursework in three of the 
above-mentioned disciplines. 
Burkhart F 94 1:50 Fall 

NPTSMNST-100 

Introduction to Theological Research 

The student is introduced to basic research 
methodology and the basic reference tools of theo- 
logical bibliography. The course is designed to 
encourage experience with a wide variety of refer- 
ence tools. One hour credit. 
Sutton Sept. 24 8-12; 1-4:30 Fall 

NPTS MNST-200 
Theological Bibliography and 
Research Methods 

The goals of this course are to introduce the refer- 
ence tools of theological bibliography and to 
enable the student to develop appropriate research 
strategies for thesis research on a master's level. 
Sutton MW 2-3:30 Fall 

NBTS1N311 

Evangelism, Salvation and Social Justice 

This course is intended for first-year students as an 
introduction to theological education and its basic 
concerns. We will examine contemporary issues 
about the inter-relationships of evangelism and 
social justice as a means of exploring the interac- 
tion of biblical studies, history and theology to 
inform the shape of Christian life and ministry in 
the church and the world. 
Dayton M 6:30-9: 15p.M. Fall 



46 



Theological Studies 



S-WTS 05-501 S 

Approaches to the Study of Religion 

and Theology 

Especially concerned with the presuppositions and 

methods of theological inquiry, the course deals 

with ways of talking responsibly about God, Jesus 

Christ, and Christian living. The philosophical 

and ecumenical contexts for doing theology are 

considered. 

Stevenson TTh 9-10:50 Fall 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU CD460 

U.S. Latino Theology 

Where are U.S. Latinos today theologically and 
where are we going? This course will look at the 
works of both Latino writers (novelists, poets) and 
theologians to discover those theological themes 
and perspectives present. Special attention will be 
paid to theological starting points, methodology 
and pastoral implications. 
Riebe-Esvrella TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU D 521 

Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx 

A seminar on the main lines in the thought of 
Edward Schillebeeckx, emphasizing his under- 
standing of the relation of God and the world and 
questions of hermeneutics. 
Schreiter W 1042:30 Foil 



ways of thinking religiously that are now current in 
liberal churches and fellowships (primarily, but not 
limited to, those of the Unitarian Universalist 
Association), and to enable the student to develop 
initial statements of his or her own religious views. 
Attention will be given to Empirical Theism, 
Religious Humanism, Feminist Theology and other 
views. 
Godbey MF 9-10:20 Fall 

MSSY319 

The Christology of Hans Urs Von Balthasar 

Von Balthasar's work represents an attempt to 
understand Christian faith from an aesthetic stand- 
point. At the heart of this program is the Christ, 
recognized as the "form" of God, the full physical 
and historical expression of the Father's beauty. 
This incarnational form animates, grounds and 
defines, not only Christian theology, but all of 
Western culture. We will explore this remarkable 
Christology through a careful reading of von 
Balthasar's Theodramatik , his principal reflection 
on the drama of the incarnation, and a perusal of 
selections from The Glory of the Lord. 
Barron TF 1:15-2:30 Fall 

TEDS ST 754 
Calvin 

Survey of Calvin's theology from the Institutes, 
tracts, letters, and commentaries and from recent 
Calvin research. 
Kantzer TBA Fall 



MTST-441K/T-659K 
Immigrant Theology and Ministry 
(Taught in Korean) 

What is God doing in and through these immi- 
grants in their context? What is the ministry with 
and of these immigrant Christians? These are the 
central questions that this course will explore. We 
shall attempt to discover some of the new mean- 
ings of the biblical faith within our particular con- 
text. Attention will also be given to how such con- 
textualized theology is carried out in other ethnic 
contexts. 
Kang Intensive Sept. 20-24 Fall 

M/L TS 336 

Theologies of the Liberal Churches 

An introduction to liberal theology, organized to 
acquaint the student with a variety of significant 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU D 442 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

A critical study of Jesus the Christ, as revealed 
through Scripture, traditions and theological 
reflection in an effort to help students come to an 
understanding of the meaning of Jesus Christ for 
their personal life, contemporary society and as 
ground for mission or pastoral practice. 
Phelps T 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

CTU D 445 

Theology of the Church and its Ministry 

A systematic study of the church and its ministry 
based on the historical development from seminal 
beginnings in the apostolic age to the present, 



47 



Theological Studies 



using the insights of post- Vatican II theologians 

such as Kiing, Rahner, Schillebeeckx, O'Meara and 

Legrand. 

Linnan MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU D 605 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar exploring various factors influencing the 
development of theology in different cultural con- 
texts. 
Schreiter M 1-3-30 Foil 

CTS CM 404 
Theologies of Preaching 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies V.) 
Edgerton TK 9-12:40 Foil 

CTS TEC 432 

Contemporary Process Theology and Social 

Ethics 

This seminar will focus on the writings of the peo- 
ple informed by the philosophical theology of A.N. 
Whitehead. Writings will be selected from the 
work of such representative figures as John Cobb, 
David Griffin, Lewis Ford, Charles Hartshorne, 
Bernard Lee, Bernard Meland, Schubert Ogden, 
Norman Pittenger and Daniel Day Williams. 
Schroeder M 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC 445 

Base Christian Community 

An introduction to the theory and the practice of 
Base Christian Community (BCC) development. 
Materials will be examined from BCC movements 
in Central and South America and elsewhere as 
well as the Small Christian Community (SCC) 
movement in Africa. BCC and SCC dialogical 
methods will be employed in the course and practi- 
cal application of these methods to ministry in 
North America will be examined. 
Caims T 6:30-9:30 P.M. Fall 

G-ETS 21-602 

Process Philosophy and Theology 

Process philosphy as reformation of traditional 

Christian understanding of God, persons, and the 

world; use of process perspectives and categories to 

do theology. Consideration of Whitehead, 

Teilhard, Hartshorne, Ogden, Cobb, Pittenger and 

Williams. 

Will MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Foil 

G-ETS 21-605 
Constructive Theology 

The use of studies in biblical, historical, and con- 



temporary theology in the formulation of one's 
own understanding of the major Christian doc- 
trines. Prereq: one foundational course each in 
Bible, history, and theology. Limit: 20. 
Young MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Fall 

G-ETS 21-625 
Theology of Holy Spirit 

The person of the Holy Spirit. Survey of relevant 
biblical passages in the Old Testament, Synoptics, 
John's Gospel, Acts and Pauline Epistles and his- 
torical developments in the life of the Church. 
How to build a personal theology of the Spirit. 
Tuttle TTh 1:30-3:20 Foil 

G-ETS 21-636 

Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective 

Systematic theological discussion of the topics of 
God, creation, humanity, sin, Christology, salva- 
tion, and church. Focus on questions raised by fem- 
inist theology for the critique of these traditional 
motifs and on their reconstruction or resymboliza- 
tion in the light of an affirmation of the full part- 
nership of women with men in the church. Prereq: 
21-501. Limit: 35. 
Ruether T 6-9 P.M. Fall 

G-ETS 21-643 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 

Analysis of major theological currents in modern 
Judaism and their relationship to general philoso- 
phy and theology. History of Jewish communities, 
their institutions, and problems, in the last 200 
years. Examination of the religious structure of the 
contemporary Jewish community. One-half unit. 
Schadmann W 5:40-7:30 P.M. Fall 

LSTC T-430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

An analytical survey of the Black experience in the 
United States, theologically correlated with histor- 
ical, psychological, and sociological factors. Special 
attention to the construction of a coherent expres- 
sion of the Christian reality so that it redemptively 
engages the world of cultures. 
Pero M 7-9:50 P.M. Fall 

LSTC T-459H 

Temas Principals de la Teologia Latinoamericana 

(Major Themes of Latin American Theology) 

Este curso le proveer£ al estudiante la oportunidad 
de familiarizarse con una seleccion de estudios que 
han surgido en America Lanina dando origen a una 
nueva manera de enterder el significado del con- 
cepto de probreza desde un punto de vista teol6gi- 



48 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



co. Tambien se les motivara a reflexionar critica y 
creativamente sobre el tema, para ayudaries a for- 
mular una postura propia sobre este asunto. 
Rodriguez W 7-9:50 P.M. Fall 

LSTCT-510 

God in Latin America 

A discussion of the shaping features of the Latin 
American social and cultural profile within the 500 
years of its presence within the history of the West, 
as the background to understanding the particular 
religious formulations and theological articulations 
within the sub-continent. Particular emphasis will 
be given to the contrasting challenges presented to 
theology. 
WestheUe TTh 2:25-3:40 Fall 

LSTC T-603 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Concepts and Methods 

The seminar is one of three that is required for 
graduate students in Christian theology. The 
emphasis will be on methodology, introducing the 
student to basic concepts and issues that will be 
used in a rigorous fashion to help students clarify 
their own methodological styles. 
Hefner T 7-9:50 P.M. Fall 

MTS T-404 
Doctrine of Christ 

Considers the doctrine of the person and work of 
Jesus Christ as the basis for Christian faith in God. 
Particular attention will be given to the problems 
of uniqueness and the universality of Jesus Christ 
vis-a-vis other bases of faith. 
Parker MW 1041:50 Fall 

MTS T-433 
Feminist Theology 

An exploration of the challenges to traditional 
Christian theology posed by feminist thought. 
Students will be exposed to the diversity of per- 
spectives in contemporary Christian theology. 
Special attention will be given to feminist critique 
and reconstruction of central Christian doctrines. 
Case-Winters MW 1041 :50 Fall 

NPTS THEQ-201 
Foundational Doctrines 

Selected doctrines of the Christian faith will be 
chosen for in-depth study, e.g., Scripture, God, 
christology, eschatology, atonement, human exis- 
tence. The course may be repeated as topics 
change. 
GiU M 2-5 Foil 



NPTS THEO-300 
Systematic Theology 1 

The center of the Christian faith is the person and 
work of Jesus Christ as confessed on the basis of 
Scripture and as reflected upon in the Christian 
tradition. Four hours. 
P. Anderson M WTK 1 J :404 2:55 Fall 

NCT1 Seminar 

(=MS SY 429; NPTS THEO-279; 

S.WTS FALL; TEDS PT 675) 
The Church and Its Mission 

This course will explore the views of several major 
Christian communions regarding the nature of the 
Church and its mission in the world. Representa- 
tives from these denominations will lecture on the 
course topic; student teams will make field trips to 
congregations of each communion. Meets at vari- 
ous locations. 
BodeyfWinters TBA Foil 

S-WTS05-612S 

Original Goodness and the Servile Will 

A foundational study of Christian anthropology 
drawing upon biblical, theological, philosophical, 
psychoanalytical, and other resources. Focused 
attention upon evil, sin, and guilt; human freedom 
and transcendence in relation to the Holy Spirit 
and divine transcendence. 
Stevenson MW 3-4:50 Fall 

S-WTS 05-620S 

Theology in the Age of Reform, 1300-1550 

Exploration of development in key areas of 
Christian doctrine during the late medieval and 
reformation periods. Topics to be considered 
include grace and free will, justification and sancti- 
fication, church and sacraments, scripture and tra- 
dition. 
Barker Th 9-1 1:50 Fall 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

l. MORAL THEOLOGY 

BTS T-460 
Theological Ethics 

Various theological responses to basic themes in 
Christian ethics: An examination of public and 
private values; the authorities that justify them, 
and the criteria by which they are evaluated. 
Sources will include case studies on specific issues. 
Wagner M 6:30-9:10 P.M. Foil 



49 



Ethical Studies 



CTU E 370 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This course is an introductory study of the basic 
themes and concerns of Christian ethics. Particular 
attention will be paid to the Roman Catholic 
moral tradition, including such topics as the 
virtues, the natural law tradition, moral decision 
making, narrative and other themes important to 
contemporary ethics. 

Wadell MW 8:30-9:45 Foil 

Nairn MW 1041:15 Winter 

CTU E 375 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

An exploration of the basic texts that illuminate 
how the Christian community has understood and 
shaped its response to the social concerns of its 
time. Although emphasis is given to foundational 
texts of the Roman Catholic tradition, authors rep- 
resentative of Protestant traditions will also be 
used. 

Pawlikowski T 7-9:30 P.M. Foil 

Wadell MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

CTSTEC321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical sys- 
tems with a consideration of their implications and 
current significance. 
Schroeder WIS Fall 

G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

A foundational course in theology and ethics. The 
formulation and implementation of ethical norms 
derived from faith commitments, based on the 
study of theory and practice (cases); development 
of a self-conscious methodology. Limit: 36. 
Vaux Th 6-9 P.M. Fall 

Eugene TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure and dynamics of 
Christian ethics, with reference to current prob- 
lems of personal and public life (Not open to first- 
year students.) 

Malcolm TT/i 3:50-5:05 Fall 

Malcolm TTh 1 -2 : 1 5 Winter 

S-WTS 08-604S 
The Moral Life 

Beginning with the classical model of Aristotle and 
Aquinas and the challenge of Luther, readings will 
focus on contemporary issues and understandings 



of the moral life. Particular attention will be given 

to the nature of moral perception and motivation, 

understandings of moral development, and the 

relationship between Christian faith and the moral 

life. 

Sedgwick MW 3-4:50 Fall 



II. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E 470 

Formation of Conscience 

A study of the various levels of conscience in rela- 
tion to decision-making. The class will discuss 
basic theories of moral decision-making. Students 
will be expected to examine their own develop- 
ment of conscience and the decision- making pro- 
cess and their implications for ministry. 
Nairn M 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

CTU E 535 
Theology and Freedom 

This seminar will investigate the understanding of 
freedom both in the Christian ethical tradition and 
in contemporary theology. The authors investigat- 
ed will include historical figures such as Augustine, 
Aquinas and Luther, as well as contemporary the- 
ologians such as Reinhold Niebuhr and Rahner. 
Nairn W 8:30-1 1 Fall 

CTU I 435 

Biblical and Ethical Aspects of Ecology 

(For course description, see Religion &. Society 

Studies.) 

Bergant/Wadell MW 1 -2: 15 Fall 

CTS TEC 432 

Contemporary Process Theology 

and Social Ethics 

(For course description, see Theological Studies III.) 
Schroeder M 2-5 Fait 

G-ETS 22-640 

Seminar in Womanist Ethics and Theology 

A literary and sociological analysis of the methods 
African-American women employ to shape an 
authentic liberation ethic, including implications 
for going beyond traditional ethical systems in 
developing a constructive ethic which shapes min- 
istry and furthers linkages and heightened sensitiv- 
ity between womanist and feminist perspectives. 
Eugene Th 6-9 P.M. Fall 



SO 



Ethical Studies 



Religion and Society Studies 



MTSE-415K 

Readings in Ethics (Taught in Korean) 

This course will engage students in reading English 
texts of contemporary Christian ethical writings. 
The course is designed to assist Korean students to 
strengthen their ability in reading theological 
English and to develop critical reflective skills in 
dealing with the contemporary issues of Christian 
ethics. 
Chun M 9-1 1:50 Foil 

M/LE438 

Spirit and Nature: Religion, Ethics and Ecology 

Comparative study of contemporary efforts at 
retrieval and reconstruction of the world's religious 
traditions as bases for environmental ethics. 
Engel F 1:30-4 Fall 

S-WTS08-611S 

Contemporary Theological Ethics 

A seminar on contemporary Christian ethics repre- 
senting different traditions, for example, 
Anabaptist, evangelical, liberation ist, Lutheran, 
Reformed, and Roman Catholic. 
Sedgwick TT/i 3-4:50 Fall 

TEDS ST 716 

Advanced Christian Ethics 

Assessment of modern ethical alternatives over a 
broad set of issues from a biblical perspective. 
Brown TBA Foil 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and lead- 
ers. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
TBA Wl-2 Foil 

TBA W 1-2:20 Winter 

TBA WJ-2 Spring 

BTS 1-570 

Modern Social Thought 

A study of the socio-critical thought of the late 
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries especially 
as it related to the study and understanding of 



religion. By studying the formative theories within 
the dawning fields of psychology, sociology of reli- 
gion, comparative religions and feminisim, the 
class will explore the rise of a secular understand- 
ing of the world and how the church has responded 
to such an understanding. 
Front* TTh 1-2:20 Fall 

BTS M-397 

The Church in the North American Context 

An introductory study of the sociological and cul- 
tural phenomenon surrounding the local congrega- 
tion in public life, the role of the media, demo- 
graphic trends in population, social factors affect- 
ing denominationalism, and social paradigms that 
are informing a contemporary understanding of 
ecclesiology. 
Frantz TTh 9:30-10:50 Fall 

CTU E 588 

Seminar on Christ, Ethics and Community 

The course is designed to study the implications of 
Christology for the life of the Christian community 
as an ethical community in an increasingly plural- 
istic world. The Christian tradition will be placed 
in dialogue with some significant non-Christian 
secular and religious authors. 
Formasari W 1-3:30 Fall 

CTU 1 435 

Biblical and Ethical Aspects of Ecology 
This course is designed on the premise of the 
integrity of creation. It will investigate the implica- 
tions of this for both Scripture and ethics. 
Particular attention will be given to a new way of 
understanding the biblical traditions and a new 
sense of ethical responsibility. Prereqs: B 300 and E 
375. 
Bergant/Wadell MW 1 -2: 15 Fall 

CTS 1 460 

Health Ministries Seminar 

The emphasis in this multi-disciplinary seminar is 
on community and congregational assessment. The 
church as a place of health and healing will be 
explored in depth. The use of self within the multi- 
disciplinary health team will be analyzed. Limited 
enrollment. 
Cukr/Dakm/Mainor/McDermott TBA Fall 

G-ETS 22-504 
Church and Community 

Analysis of local churches' interaction with their 
communities in city, suburb, and small town as 
basis for ministry in evangelism, counseling, social 



51 



Religion and Society Studies 



World Mission Studies 



service, and action for social change. Theological 
options, use of social theory and data, case studies 
of effective ministry, and exploration of racism, 
role of women and peace action in the local com- 
munity. Limit: 30. 
Eugene T 6-9 P.M. Fall 

LSTC M-370 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

A consideration of the church's responsible 
involvement in the public sector. Emphasizes the 
relation between faith and justice and the impor- 
tance of careful social analysis as the basis for the 
church's work of advocacy. Emphasis on the 
church's role in the tranformation of social sys- 
tems. Includes some field work. 
Bloomquist/Strehlou) W 2:30-5 Fall 

Folk W 2-30-5 Winter 

MTS M-350 

The Church as a Health Resource 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies I.) 
Manor M 2-4:50 Fall 

SCUPE S-H 301 
Conceptions of a City 

This two-week orientation course introduces stu- 
dents of SCUPE to their placements and surround- 
ing communities, and life in a big industrial city. 
Chicago provides an excellent laboratory setting 
for studying urban issues; students learn about the 
city's history, complexity, problems, ethnic groups, 
structures, strengths and weaknesses. Students also 
become acquainted with several models of ministry 
in the city. 2 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Cooper/McGibbon Aug. 30-Sept. 10 Fall 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 

CTU B 490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

(For course description, see Biblical Studies - 

General.) 

Lenchak MW 1041:15 Fall 

CTU C 409 

Mission on the Margins: Homelessness in the City 

Involves students in 'hand-on' ministry - overnight 
- with homeless people. The objective is ministry 
with as well as learning about. Reading, reflection 
and an integrating paper required. Times flexible 
(10 weeks' equivalent, but adaptable over a 4-6 



month period from the beginning of November.) 

Commitment to ministry essential but no previous 

experience required. Permission of instructor 

required. 

Gittins TBA FaR/Winter/Spring 

CTU C 410 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge 

What are the implications of the call to mission for 
every Christian? This course examines mission at 
the limits of our own cultural and religious experi- 
ence, calling for transformation and conversion. 
Gittins TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU C 412 

Inter-Faith Dialogue: Theory and Praxis 

This course seeks to develop a ministry of inter- 
faith dialogue. Experiencing the rich heritage of 
significant faith traditions will provide an opportu- 
nity to appreciate/understand their rituals and sym- 
bols and to reflect theologically on the meaning of 
inter- faith ministry. 
Kaserow W 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

CTU CH325 

Models of Missionary Activity 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 
Schroeder MW 1041:15 Foil 

CTU/MTS 1 575 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

Specially designed for returned missionaries and 
students wishing to debrief an Overseas Training 
Program/cross-cultural experience. Through guided 
sharing and mutual support, this seminar helps par- 
ticipants process their mission/ministry experience 
and re-entry into the home culture. Jointly-spon- 
sored by CTU and MTS; held at CTU. Limit: 15. 
Kaserow T 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

Kaserow T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

Staff T 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

MTS/CTU 1-460 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry - Level 1 

A quarter-long intensive based on Paulo Freire's 
methodology, providing theological, spiritual and 
experiential dimensions, designed to help partici- 
pants prepare for cross-cultural ministry overseas 
and/or at home. Emphasis is placed on ecumeni- 
cal/interfaith dialogue and the development of atti- 
tudes for global mission and spirituality. 3, 6, or 9 
credits. Limit: 15. Class will meet at MTS. 
Barbour IDoidge M 7-9. -50 P.M Fall 

Barbour IDoidge M 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 



52 



World Mission Studies 



History of Religions/Ministry Studies 



NPTSMNST-150 

Introduction to Missions 

A study of the biblical basis of missions and various 

theologies of mission will be considered. Issues in 

Covenant missions, policies, and missionary call 

and qualifications will be examined. 

Weld W2-5 Fall 

NPTS MNST-250 
Mission of the Church 

The biblical basis of mission and various theologies 
and methods for carrying on that mission, particu- 
larly by the Covenant, at home and abroad are 
examined. Four hours. 
Weld UWTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 

TEDS CH 772 

Cults and New Religions 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 

Tucker TBA Fall 

TEDS ME 765 

Mission Strategy: Historical and 

Theological Perspectives 

An analysis of the socio-political and theological 
factors which have shaped the development and 
implementation of mission strategy through the 
epochs of church history. Special attention to con- 
temporary applications of the lessons learned from 
history. 
Rommen TBA FaR 



LSTC W-429 
World Religions 

A phenomenological study of world religions with 
particular attention to History of Religions per- 
spectives. An additional emphasis will be placed 
on the problem of conflict and reconciliation 
between different faiths. Meets at the Lutheran 
Center, 8765 West Higgins Road (near O'Hare). 
Undberg M 6-9 P.M. Fall 

LSTC W-529 

Sira and Hadith Literature 

A study of the prophet Muhammad and the role he 
plays in exemplifying the Qur'an and the model 
Muslim life. Students will also explore the rich lit- 
erature of Tradition, which comprises the second 
authoritative source for Muslim life and thought. 
Aasi UW 2:25-3:40 Fall 

LSTC W-530 

History of the Development of 

Religious Thought in Islam 

The appearence of three schisms in the early histo- 
ry of Islam (Kharaidji, Shi'i, and Sunni) set before 
Muslim thinkers the problems of the validity and 
status of the imam (leader). Through lecture and 
seminar method, the class will explore some of the 
historic, intellectual and theological movements 
within Islam and see how they continue to shape 
Muslim thought and action. 
Vogelaar MW 1-2:15 Fall 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 



MSB1331 

Wisdom Literature (OT) 

(For course description, see Old Testament III.) 
Mcllhone MTh 1:15-2:30 Fall 



LSTC W-424 

Conflict and Reconciliation: Christian Encounter 

with People of Other Faith Commitments 

Most challenges posed by social and industrial 
change are challenges equally to all religious com- 
munities and to discuss them in isolation can be 
misleading. Many religious communities in Asia, 
such as Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism, 
meet the challenges with different resources than 
do most Western Christians. What are the flash 
points and what are the potentials for reconcilia- 
tion? The purpose of this team- taught course is to 
explore carefully what these resources are and to 
examine them in light of our own faith commit- 
ments. 



hhidaJThan/Vogelaar TTh 1-2:15 



FaR 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CTU M 409 

Ministry on the Margins 

This course uses readings and field experiences to 
explore selected areas in ministry. Possible opportu- 
nities include justice and peace, alcoholism, street 
ministries, ministry with persons involved in pros- 
titution. By arrangement with justice and peace 
staff. 
Szura TBA Fall/Winter/ Spring 



53 



The Nature and Practice of Ministry 



CTS CM 300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing and 
initiating a style of pastoral and theological reflec- 
tion; to provide the student with the perspective 
on the nature, history and practice of ministry in 
Christian vocation. Open to students other than 
CTS with permission of the instructor. 
Edgerton W 9-12:40 Foil 

G-ETS 34-610 
Introduction to Evangelism 

The gospel and its transmission in the New 
Testament and early Church history. Informal con- 
temporary patterns of personal and corporate evan- 
gelism, including specific strategies for communi- 
cating Christian faith in today's world. 
Tuttle T 6-9 P.M. Fall 

LSTCM-416 

Local Immersion 

An extension of the Pilot Immersion Project for 
the Globalization of Theological Education. 
Students in this course will be assigned to individu- 
als or groups who are carrying on social or cross 
cultural ministry in the metropolitan area. 
Experiences in this field setting will also be pro- 
cessed in periodic sessions on campus. The course 
will last throughout the year. 
Lindberg First meeting: M 2:25-3:40 Fatt 

LSTC M-450 

Senior Seminar 1: 

Theology and the Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of the- 
ology in pastoral formation and functioning, and 
based on experiences and problems encountered in 
internship. 

TBA TT/v 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Rodriguez TTh 8:30-9:45 Fail 

MTSM-331K 

Stewardship in the Korean-American Church 

(Taught in Korean) 

This course is designed to equip students to minis- 
ter to their congregations through education and 
training as full-fledged members of the body of 
Christ in stewardship as well as worship, witness, 
education and fellowship. 
A. Kim Intensive Sept. 640 Fall 



MTS M-350 

The Church as a Health Resource 

Rarely thought of in our time in the context of a 
health resource, the church and communities of 
faith provide both locus and springboard for the 
provision of health, healing and wholeness, central 
to the biblical record. This course will explore the 
rich and diverse ministries available when we take 
seriously the church as health resource. 
Manor M 2 A 60 Fall 

MTS M-375 

Church Based Organizing: 

A Strategy for Ministry in the Urban Setting 

Focus will be on developing vital and faithful con- 
gregations as an antidote to an alienating urban 
culture. Besides readings and guest trainers, the pri- 
mary emphasis will be an action/reflection learning 
model involving on-site observations and work 
with congregation based power organizations 
engaged in strategies of outreach, leadership devel- 
opment, evangelism, organizational development 
and impacting community issues. 
Mariano/Galluzzo M 2-4:50 Fall 

M/L M 365 

Arts of Ministry: Leadership 

The first part of a year-long sequence in the theory 
and practice of liberal ministry, this course is 
devoted to exploring the role of liberal religious 
leadership, considering the nature of its various 
institutional contexts, and assisting students to 
frame working drafts of their personal covenants as 
ministers. 
Shadle/Binger W 1:30-4 Fall 

M/L M 366 

Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry 

Concerned with the theory and practice of min- 
istry, this intensive course addresses the role of the 
liberal church and ministry in the world: What is 
public ministry? How are public issues raised, 
defined, resolved? What do churches and ministers 
contribute to justice making and the enhancement 
of public life? In addition to class meetings Jan. 3- 
8, students will participate in some all day field 
trips. Participants must register in the Fall Quarter 
to receive assignments prior to class meeting. 
Shadle/Engel Required Registration Fall 

Shadle/Engel Jan. 3-8 9-12 and 2-5 Winter 



S4 



The Nature and Practice of Ministry 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



MS PI308 

Ministry to Hearing Impaired Persons 

The objective of the course is to introduce students 
to the world of those who are handicapped by the 
loss of hearing and in particular to those problems 
and skills unique to ministering to the needs of 
these people. It includes an introduction to the use 
of Total-Communication, the language of the deaf 
and hearing handicapped, an introduction to cul- 
tural, legal, social service, emotional and religious 
aspects of the deaf world, and aims to develop an 
understanding of ministry to the hearing handi- 
capped person in the field of liturgy and religious 
education. 
Mulcrone/Schlesinger TBA Fall 

NPTS MNST-260 
Metropolitan Evangelism 

The complexity and diversity of metropolitan cen- 
ters is studied with emphasis on biblical and cultur- 
ally appropriate models for evangelism and church 
planting. 
Reed W7-10 P.M. Foil 

NPTS MNST-278 
Management Skills 

The course will review basic principles and prac- 
tices of management with a focus on developing 
practical management skills to assist the Christian 
leader in the effective conduct of her/his ministry. 
Attention is given to planning, organizing, staffing, 
leading, deciding and communicating. Two hours. 
Wright Dec. J3-I7 8:30-12:30 Foil Post -Term 

NBTSMN301 

Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

In this study of both the theology and practice of 
evangelism, it is assumed that both the theology of 
evangelism and the practice of evangelism are 
equally important. Theology tells us what and why; 
practice tells us how. 
Duffett W 2:30-5:15 Foil 

NBTS MN 655 

Systems Analysis of Religious Organizations 

The church is swimming in a sea of change — tur- 
bulency inside the church structures and in the 
environment. Under such circumstances the only 
organizations that survive must be mission driven 
and able to adapt quickly and appropriately. This 
course will give church leaders a new way of think- 
ing about the church in relation to its internal and 
external environments, how other systems affect 



the church, and how to coordinate the church's 
strategic components for greater effectiveness. 
Shawchuck Intensive Aug. 23-27 Fall Pre-Term 

S-WTS 12-61 IS 
Theology of Ministry 

An examination of several contemporary models of 
ministry, ranging from those patterned after "the 
English country parson" to televangelism. The 
ecclesiological, christological, soteriological, and 
missionological presuppositions of each will be 
examined with the goal of discerning their merits 
and shortcomings. 
Winters TTh 1-2:50 Fall 

SCUPEM301 

The African-American Church 

in the Urban Setting 

The organization and dynamics of African- 
American life as experienced in the city's minority- 
dominant communities is the focus of this one- 
week intensive course. Organized around the 
shared social institutions unique to the African- 
American experience, the course looks at the 
African-American church and the extended family 
structure, among other features. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Martin Sept. 27 -Oct. I Fall 

SCUPE M 304 

Introduction to Urban Ministry 

This course takes a closer look at the particular 
problems of the inner city poor in relation to the 
city as a whole and examines models of effective 
ministry. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
HawkinsfLeslie T A.M. Fall 



II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTUS410 
Spiritual Direction 

A survey of the history of the development of the 
notion of spiritual direction from its apostolic ori- 
gins to the present. Treatment of the contemporary 
reality of spiritual direction will focus on the quali- 
tities of the director, the aims of experience, and 
different types and forms of the spiritual dialogue. 
Students will engage in role-playing various collo- 
quies and share in evaluating the experiences. 
TBA M 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 



55 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



CTUS413 
Jesus of Nazareth: 
Reinterpreting His Spirituality 

Based on twentieth-century research into the per- 
sonality and history of Jesus, this course will 
attempt to give fresh understanding of the spiritual 
experience of Jesus as a source of inspiration for the 
spirituality of his disciples. A personal journal of 
readings and reflections will be required. 
Lozano TTh 1-2:15 Fall 

CTU S 605 

Issues in Christian Spirituality: 

Historical Roots/Contemporary Expressions 

This seminar will explore some of the main issues 
in today's spirituality, analyzing their theological 
meaning and placing them against their historical 
background. Enrollment limited. Permission of 
instructor required. 
Lozano TKS-30-ll Fall 

CTU WS650 

Liturgical Foundations for Spirituality 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies IV.) 
Ostdiek W 1042:30 Fall 

CTS CM 435 

Jungian Psychology and Contemporary 

Spirituality 

An investigation of the contribution of Jungian 
psychology to the theory and practice of postmod- 
ern spirituality. The course will include both theo- 
retical and experiential components. Topics con- 
sidered will include the role of the shadow, the 
influence of psychological typology, the experience 
of synchronicity, and the spiritual significance of 
dreams. 
Moore Th 9-12:40 Fall 

CTS CM 543 

David: A Study in Masculine Psychology 

and Spirituality 

This course will introduce the student to the 
importance of traditions regarding David the King 
for understanding both the problems and promise 
of masculine spirituality. Registration limited to 
M.Div. seniors and advanced degree students only. 
Moore W 2-5 Fall 

MS MO405 (Sp) 

Spirituality by Way of Autobiography 

An analysis of the autobiographical writings of 
Augustine, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Jesus, 
Therese of Lisieux, and Thomas Merton reveals 
the unchanging call of the Gospel and the varying 



cultural and historical forms in which Christian 

spirituality is realized. 

CameU TBA Foil 

MS MO408(S P ) 
Inferiority and Catastrophe 

Out of the experience of the Holocaust and the 
Second World War there emerged a body of pro- 
foundly spiritual literature. The writers are studied: 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Anne Frank, Elie Wiesel, Etty 
Hillesum and Alfred Delp. 
CameU MT/i 2:40-4 Fall 

NPTS MNST-101 

Spiritual Formation I: Spiritual Journey 

The spiritual life grows by direction and discipline. 
The journal, prayer life, devotional reading, time 
management and simplicity are modes of discipline 
and direction which are examined in this course. 
One hour credit. 
Weborg/Staff T 8-9:50 Fall 

NPTS MNST-207 
Discipleship Practicum 1 

This course seeks to prepare the student in both 
the theoretical and practical dimensions of disci- 
pleship. The biblical pattern of training leaders is 
applied to the discipling process in today's church. 
The student will do actual discipling as the course 
progresses. One credit hour; first of three quarters. 
Reed TBA Fall 

NBTSMN412 

Readings in Contemporary Spirituality 

A course in which the contemporary practices of 
spiritual formation such as daily quiet time, reflec- 
tive reading of scripture, journaling, spiritual direc- 
tion, retreat and contemplative prayer will be 
explored in the writings of contemporary authors. 
Clemmons T 6-30-9:15 P.M. Fall 

NBTS MN 618 

Personal and Church Renewal 

An experiential course in spiritual formation indi- 
vidually through the use of daily quiet time, reflec- 
tive reading of Scripture (lectio divina), journal- 
ing, spiritual direction, styles of prayer and silent 
retreat; and corporately as congregations give life 
and structure to its understanding of God's mission 
in the world. 
Clemmons Intensive Aug. 16-20 Fall 

TEDS PT 845A 

Advanced Spiritual Formation 

In this course we propose to explore certain tradi- 



56 



Pastoral Care 



tions of Christian spirituality for personal and cor- 
porate enrichment. It will be important to under- 
stand to what degree and in what manner we can 
use and benefit from significant traditions which 
represent different and indeed heterodox doctrine 
(e.g., Teresa of Avila and Saint John of the Cross). 
Opportunity will be given each student to pursue 
in some depth a tradition or figure in Christian 
spirituality and then to share certain of the richer 
and more valuable insights with the entire class. 
Larsen TBA Fall 



III. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-381 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

The purpose of this course is to give a broad 

overview of the field of Pastoral Care and 

Counseling. 

TBA TBA Fall 

CTU MP360 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

This course aids students to develop and assess 1) 
knowledge of pastoral counseling principles and 
dynamics; 2) skills in the face-to- face encounter; 3) 
ability to critique and learn from their counseling 
ministry. Time required outside class in practice 
and review sessions with peers and instructor. 
Enrollment limited . 

Anderson MW 11:30-12:45 FaR 

Anderson MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU MP441 

Pastoral Care of Families 

This course will utilize the family life cycle as a 
framework for exploring the family systems per- 
spective and its contribution to pastoral care in the 
parish. Students will examine their own families of 
origin as a resource for learning to think systems. 
Anderson W 7-9:30 P.M. FaR 

CTS CM 435 

Jungian Psychology and Contemporary 

Spirituality 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies II.) 
Moore T 26 FaR 



G-ETS 32-501 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including a study of human 
development, growth, crisis, and pathology; the 
development of skills in integrating theology and 
the practice of ministry with an understanding of 
human growth and interpersonal relationships. 
Limit: 30. 

Hinkk F9-12 Fall 

TBA Jan. 24-Mar. 1 8 TTK I -3 :20 Winter 

G-ETS 32-620 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling 

Students must be engaged in local ministry settings 
on a part-time basis so that they will have access to 
pastoral care/counseling cases. Students will 
explore the interaction between culture and per- 
sonality in theological and psychological contexts. 
Students will develop pastoral care skills, under- 
standings and strategies. Students will learn to uti- 
lize peer and professional consultation for on-going 
skill development in pastoral care and counseling. 
A year- long course; one unit for three quarters. 
Limit: 15. Permission of instructor required. 
Hinkle Th 3:306 FaR, Winter, Spring 

G-ETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to theory and practice of pastoral coun- 
seling for prospective parish pastor. Emphasis on 
counseling skill development as well as theological, 
cross-cultural, and psychological models of inter- 
pretation. Limit: 20. 
Hinkk Th 6-9 P.M. Fall 

M/LM330 

Pastoral Care in the Liberal Church 

This intensive will explore the interrelations of 
spirituality and pastoral care in the liberal/human- 
ist tradition. Drawing upon contemporary psycho- 
logical and religious literature, the role of congre- 
gation as caregiver and an examination of the CPE 
experience as formative for ministry, students will 
develop parameters for caregiving in their min- 
istries. Participants must register for this intensive 
in the Fall Quarter. 

Evison/Staff Required Registration Fall 

EvisonJStaff Jan. 3-7 9-12 and 26 Winter 



CTS CM 543 

David: A Study in Masculine Psychology and 

Spirituality 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies II.) 
Moore W 26 FaR 



NPTSMNST-120 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

For first-year students. Case methods, role play, 
demonstrations, readings and lecture impart strate- 
gies and skills to equip the pastor for working with 



57 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



the congregation to provide an effective ministry 
to personal and family needs. Four hours. 
Robinson MW 11:404:30 FaR 

NPTS MNST-220 
Ministry to the Aging 

Readings, lecture, case method and films exploring 
the meaning and process of aging in our culture as 
a basis for the development of pastoral and congre- 
gational minstry to the needs of this group. 
Jackson W 740 P.M. FaR 

NPTS MNST-222 

Human Sexuality and the Church 

Lecture, readings, discussion, case method and 
films relate the theological, biblical and psycholog- 
ical aspects of sexuality with an emphasis on pas- 
toral counseling and applications. 
KHngberg M 740 p.m. FaR 

NPTS MNST-325 

Pastoral Care in Korean-American Churches 

Lecture, readings and case management method 
equip Korean-American pastors, laity or mental 
health professionals to deal with persons and fami- 
lies in transitional suffering and crisis: psycho- 
social, psychiatric, organizational, and biblical/the- 
ological analysis. 
Lee M 740 P.M. FaR 

NBTS PC 301 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including the development 
of skills in integrating theology and the practice of 
ministry with an understanding of issues in inter- 
personal relationships. 
Justes TTh 1-2:20 FaR 

NBTS PC 401 
Pastoral Theology 

An exploration of the integration of theology with 
the practice of pastoral care through the use of case 
studies presented by the participants. Prereq: foun- 
dational courses in Bible and Theology. 
Justes M 1-3:45 Fall 

NBTS PC 405H 

Amor y Sexual idad Humana (Love and Human 

Sexuality) 

Este curso estudia el fenomeno del amor en termi- 
nos interdisciplinarios con especial atencion a la 
relacion entre las perspectivas biblica, teologica y 
psicol6gica. En ese marco se considera especial- 



mente la sexualidad humana, a la luz de los desafios 

de la realidad historica actual en el contexto his- 

pano/latinoamericano. 

Schipani F 2:30-5:15 Fall 

S-WTS 12-502S 

The Pastor as Care Giver 

The course will expose prospective parish priests to 
the theory and practice of pastoral care. Emphasis 
will be placed on the development of pastoral 
skills, as well as theological, cross-cultural, and psy- 
chological models of interpretation. 
Myers W 6-9 P.M. Fall 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

BTS M-478 
Passages and Rituals 

Students will study the theological basis for rituals 
that are celebrated at various passages of life and 
will write services for these celebrations, including 
music, Scripture, homily, and order of worship. 
Such rituals include baby dedications, confirma- 
tions, baptisms, weddings, ordinations, funeral and 
memorial serivces. New rituals for optional use will 
also be studied. 
Faus W 2:30-5:10 Fall 

CTUW455 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: 

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 

Historical, theological and pastoral reflection on 
the experience and sacraments of Christian 
Initiation, with particular focus on the Rite of 
Christian Initiation of Adults as the norm for ini- 
tiatory practice. 

Fronds (A) TTh 1041:15 Fall 

Francis (B) Joliet Satellite, Fall 



Hughes 



Sept. 25; Oct. 23; Nov. 20; Dec. 11 
M 7-9:30 p.m. 



Spring 



CTU W 564 

Seminar in Liturgical History 

This seminar course will trace the history of the 
liturgy through major watershed events and key 
persons and movements. Students will be expected 
to participate actively in research and presenta- 
tions throughout the quarter. Limit 12. 
Francis M 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 



58 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



Preaching and Communication 



CTU WS650 

Liturgical Foundations for Spirituality 

This seminar will explore the structures, prayer 
forms, rhythms and theology of celebration with a 
view to uncovering the liturgical foundations and 
dimensions of a Christian spirituality. Open to 
M.A. and advanced M.Div. students with instruc- 
tor's permission. 
Ostdiek W 1042-30 Fall 

G-ETS 31-511 
Christian Public Worship 

The importance of worship in the life and work of 
the minister and the congregation. Increasing com- 
petence in the understanding, theology, planning, 
and leadership of worship. Limit: 24. 
Dude MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Foil 

Duck Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTh 1-3:20 Winter 



and discussion of readings in the history, theology, 
and practice of church music (Spring term). One- 
half unit. 
Finster M 1040:50 Fall 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-370 
Introduction to Preaching 

As an introductory course, the goals are to enable 
the students to acquire the basic knowledge and 
skills necessary for understanding and effectively 
performing the preaching art. The structure of the 
course will include a survey of biblical and theolog- 
ical foundations for preaching. 
TBA Sept. 13-24 TB A Fall 



NPTS THEO-202 

Worship: The Church, Sacraments and Liturgy 

The study of worship is the study of God's service 
to the church (word, sacrament) and the church's 
service to God (praise, prayer, proclamation, ritu- 
al). Four hours. 
Weborg MWTh 8-9:15 Foil 

NPTS MNST-372 
Hymnology 

This historical overview of the great hymnic peri- 
ods of the Christian church provides an analysis of 
selected hymns from theological, musical and poet- 
ical perspectives. It introduces and gives ideas for 
practical usage of The Covenant Hymnal in the 
local parish setting. Intensive. One hour credit. 
Echhardt Oct. 22-23 Fall 

S-WTS 09-522S 
Anglican Worship 

A study of the Book of Common Prayer and the dis- 
tinctive Anglican ethos of worship from the first 
Prayer Book of 1549 and its sources to the 
American Prayer Book of 1979. The structure and 
theology of the various revisions, especially in 
England and the United States. 
Mitchell WF 940:50 Fall 

S-WTS 11-515S 
Church Music 1A 

A non-divisable course in two parts: A) An explo- 
ration of the resources of the Hymnal, including 
rehearsal of hymns and service music for chapel 
liturgies, with attention to building repertoire and 
singing it with style (Fall term). B) A lecture on 



CTU MW450 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

The foundational course in homiletics, this 
practicum examines the homily as a liturgical 
action within the Christian assembly. Participants 
consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural and practical 
dynamics of preaching and effective communica- 
tion skills. Course emphasis is on actually prepar- 
ing and delivering the homily and on receiving and 
offering constructive critique. Limit: 12. 
Fragomeni M 1-3-30 Fall 

Fragomeni M 13:30 Winter 

CTU MW458 

Preaching the Sunday Lectionary: Cycle B 

An advanced practicum in liturgical preaching, 
MW458 considers the homily in the Sunday 
eucharistic assembly. Participants will study the 
designated lectionary cycle, preach several Sunday 
homilies from the cycle and survey the entire cycle 
of readings as the context for homily preparation. 
Included in this course is the study of various 
hermeneutical methods of writing liturgical homi- 
lies. Limit: 8. Prereq: MW450 or equiv. 
Fragomeni T 7-9:30 P.M. Fall 

CTS CM 404 
Theologies of Preaching 

This course is an exploration of the nature and 
place of preaching both in tradition and the con- 
temporary global church. The goal is for the stu- 
dent to articulate his or her own understanding of 
the task and the personal implications for preach- 
ing ministry. 
Edgerton TK 9-1 2:40 Fall 



59 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

The growth of the sermon from text and idea 
through presentation and evaluation. Delivery of 
sermons by each student in class. The course may 
not be taken during a student's first year or its part- 
time equivalent . Limit: 12. 
Chatfield WF 940:50 Fall 

Chatfield Jan. 24-Mar. J8 TTh J -3:20 Winter 
Chatfield A WF 940:50 Spring 

ChatfieldB MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Spring 

G-ETS 31-605 

The Uses of Story in Preaching 

Exploration, through reading, experimentation and 

preaching to the class, of some ways story has been 

and can be used to enhance preaching, such as 

plotted structure, participatory preparation, imaged 

argument and eventful language. Limit: 1 2. Prereq: 

31-501. 

Chatfield MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Fall 

NPTSMNST-210 
Introduction to Homiletics 

The student will learn the fundamentals of theolo- 
gy of preaching and principles of sermon construc- 
tion and will practice these learnings in laboratory 
experience. 
Noren MWTh 11:4042:55 Fall 

NPTS B1BL-237 
Preaching from Jeremiah 

Exegetical method and homiletic practice will 
meet in this team-taught course as students exam- 
ine both the life and times of Jeremiah and the 
theological message of the book that bears his 
name. Students will write and deliver sermons that 
reflect the diverse biblical forms of Jeremiah (nar- 
rative, prophetic oracle and lament) and relate 
with sensitivity to peoples' needs and the Church's 
traditions. 
Kopiak/Noren M 2-5 Fall 

NPTSMNST-215 
Preaching as Celebration 

This course will explore the role of celebration in 
preaching and how the use of "conscious celebra- 
tion" will make persons more effective preachers. 
Two hours credit. 
Thomas Dec. 13-17 8:30-12:30 Fall Post-Term 



NBTS MN 382 
Principles of Preaching 

This introductory course in preaching is designed 
to acquaint the student with the basic knowledge 
and skills necessary for effective preaching. Special 
attention will be given to the exegesis of scripture 
and sermon organization. 
Duffett/Butler T 2:30-5:15 Fall 

NBTS MN 382H 

Predication: Una Perspective Pastoral 

(Preaching: A Pastoral Perspective) 

Introduccion a fundamentos biblicos-teologicos, 
contextualizacion sociologica y presupuestos 
metodologicos para una predicacion pastoral perti- 
nente en contextos hispanos. Consideracion de los 
elementos homileticos en el orden cronologico en 
que el/la predicacor/a los usa al preparar el sermon. 
Los/as estudiantes presentaran — no predicaran — 
sermones para evaluacion de la clase y profesor. 
Mottesi T 2:30-5:15 Fall 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

G-ETS 33-506 

Theological Education in the Parish 

Task of the pastor and educator as theological edu- 
cators in the parish. Interplay of theology and 
teaching methods within the life and mission of 
the community of faith. Limit: 40. 
Seymour/Feliciano TTK 9- 10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 33-615 

Adults and Christian Eaith 

Ways adults learn; faith issues, lifestyles, and 
resources, and their implications for educational 
approaches of the Church to young, middle, and 
older adults. 
L.Vogel TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

G-ETS 33-640 

Media for Ministry and Mission 

Introduces the theory and practice of communica- 
tion for media use in the local church. While there 
will be readings, guest speakers and lectures, the 
primary teaching method will be a series of media 
exercises with primary emphasis on oral and video 
media. Students will relate the course work to the 
parish where they worship or serve. Limit: 12. 
Mohan TTh 3:30-5 Fall 



60 



Educational Ministry 



LSTC M-360A 

Educational Ministry: Teaching and Learning 

Students will study the theological and develop- 
mental foundations of Christian Education and 
put them into practice by teaching at four age lev- 
els using four different teaching-learning models. 
Part of the Teaching Parish experience. 
Conrad M 1-160; W 3-4:40 Foil 

LSTC M-360B 

Educational Ministry: Pastors as Teachers 

The class will develop models for the pastor as 
teacher in all aspects of parish life (classroom, 
home, worship, sacraments, administration, nur- 
ture, evangelism, stewardship, leadership develop- 
ment, etc.) Emphasis on the parish as an intention- 
al learning community. Students will develop 
learning contracts based on their experience in 
educational ministry. Part of the Teaching Parish 



experience. 

ConradJ]ohnson TTh 2 -.25-3 :40 



Fall 



MTSM-313 

Educational Ministry of the Church 

This course offers an introduction to the field of 
religious education by examining the dimensions of 
educational ministry within the congregation. 
Particular attention will be given to educational 
theories explicit in practice that enable persons to 
grow in faith. Current issues in the field of religious 
education will be discussed. 
Caldwell Tl-4 Fall 

MTS M-503 

Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Religious 

Education 

This seminar is designed as a reading course for dis- 
cusion of current texts in the area of religious edu- 
cation theory and practice. Prereq: one or two 
courses in religious education. Permission of 
instructor required. 
Caldwell TBA Fall 

M/LM312 

Multicultural Religious Education 

This course examines the foundational issues relat- 
ed to religious education in the culturally and 
racially plural society. Special attention will be 
given to the social construction of prejudice, 
stereotypes and racial theories, as well as to identi- 
fying resources for congregational education which 
value the life and culture of all peoples. Some 



opportunities for involvement in a racially diverse 
religious education setting may be arranged. 
Harlow M 2-4:30 Fall 

M/LM415 

Religious Education Curriculum 

This course will explore the theoretical founda- 
tions for curriculum design and instruction in reli- 
gious education settings. Attention will be given to 
probing critical issues, articulating principles of 
evaluation, and exploring appropriate methods for 
various educational purposes. Participants must reg- 
ister for this intensive in the Fall Quarter in order 
to receive the reading assignments, which are to be 
studied prior to the week of the class. 
HarlowfMannheirn Required Registration Fall 

Harhw/Mannheim Jan. 10-14 9-12; 2-5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-131 

Introduction to Christian Education 

and Discipleship 

The conceptual framework for the building of an 
effective teaching ministry in the local church is 
examined: historical, biblical, developmental, edu- 
cational and organizational. Four hours credit. 
F. Anderson W 2-5 Fall 

NPTSMNST-132 
Adult Development 

The course seeks to investigate adult stage theory, 
adult transitions, as well as cyclical and linear life 
patterns. We explore theory, research and experi- 
ence in the spiritual, intellectual, emotional, physi- 
cal and social areas of adult life. This will be done 
in the context of church and culture. 
Forsman Th 2-5 Fall 

NPTSMNST-136 

The Church's Ministry with Families 

A systems approach is used here in the study of 
family life, development stages, needs and prob- 
lems. A variety of ministry models and resources is 
examined and evaluated. 
F. Anderson M 7-10 P.M. Fall 

NPTSMNST-141 

Youth Ministry Practicum 

This experience includes the integration of theory 
and practice under supervision in ministry situa- 
tions in local churches. One hour credit. 
Wysong TBA Fall 



61 



Educational Ministry 

NPTS MNST-240 
Children and Worship 

This experience is for the experiential develop- 
ment of basic teaching skills. 
Bower Nov. 5-6 Intensive Fall 

NPTSMNST-241 
Leadership in Youth Ministry 

Surveys current thought on the spiritual formation 
of the leader. Attention will be given to spiritual 
disciplines, marriage and ministry, avoidance of 
stress and burnout and strategies for personal 
growth and development. One hour credit. 
TBA Oct. 15 6-9 P.M.; Oct. 16 9-4 Fall 

NBTS TH 440H 

Educacion y Teologia (Education and Theology) 

Estudio de la relacion entre teologia y ministerio 
educativo, enfocada en la contribucion de la 
teologia de la liberacion. Atencion especial a: 
dinamica de la concientizacion, vision profetica- 
utopica, epistemologia praxeologica, hermeneuti- 
ca/reflexion critica y comunidad eclesial. Se alienta 
la accion desde el compromiso contextual de la fe. 
Prereq: TH 301 o TH 301 H o permiso del profesor. 
Schipani F 6 :30-9 : 15 P.M. Fall 



Polity and Canon Law 

TEDS CE 500 

Educational Ministry of the Church 

Introduction to local church administration and 
teaching, focusing on the aims, principles, organi- 
zation and development of a local church educa- 
tional program; and on the aims, methods, media 
and evaluation of the teaching process. 
Sett TBA Foil 

VII. POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 

CTU MW421 
Church and Structure 

An introductory course in canon law, briefly treat- 
ing the nature, role and history of canon law; 
church structures; the Eastern rites; ministries and 
holy orders; clerical discipline; the teaching office; 
acts of divine worship other than sacraments; 
sacred places and times; and general norms. 
NeviUe TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

NeviUe MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

M/LH395 

Unitarian Universalist History and Polity 

(For course description, see Historical Studies II.) 
Godbey/Staff Required Registration Fall 

Godbey/Staff Jan. 17-21 9-5 Winter 



62 



Old Testament 



WINTER 1994 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTUB417 
lntertestamental Literature 

A survey of non-canonical Jewish literature pro- 
duced from 200 B.C. to A.D 200. Emphasis on the 
impact these writings had on the theology of early 
Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. Prereq: B 300 or 
equiv. 
Hoppe Th 8:3041 Winter 

CTU I 630 

Interpretive Methods: Bible Study & Preaching 

(For course description, see Ministry Studies V.) 
BergantJFragomeni W 2:30-5 Winter 

TEDS OT 845 

Use of Critical Methods in Old Testament Study 

Consideration of the purpose, goals, and methodol- 
ogy of the principal critical approaches to the Old 
Testament, including textual criticism, form criti- 
cism, redaction criticism and literary criticism. 
Emphasis will be given to the application of each 
method to a selected biblical text. 
Magary TBA Winter 



OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B 300 

Old Testament Introduction 

A study of the tradition and literature of ancient 
Israel against their historical and cultural back- 
ground. Attention will also be given to some of the 
literary and theological issues involved in biblical 
interpretation. 

Bergant MW 1041:15 Winter 

Bergant MW 1-2:15 Spring 

G-ETS 11-511 

Old Testament Interpretation 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bird Jan. 24-Mar.l8 TTK 7-9:20 P.M. Winter 

LSTCB-311 

Old Testament: Methods of Study 

Introduces students to the methods of interpreting 
Old Testament texts, using the Hebrew language, 



and of understanding the Old Testament. Special 

attention will be given to the Psalms and wisdom 

literature. 

Fuerst MTh 10:4542 Winter 

Michel MTh 1 0:454 2 Winter 

NPTSBIBL-120 
Old Testament Faith 1 

The literature of the ancient Near East and the 
Jewish-Christian traditions provides the contexts 
in which we "listen" to the Hebrew Bible (Genesis 
through Judges). 
Holmgren MWTK 10:154 1 -30 Winter 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B 410 
Early Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from pre-exilic prophets. 
Emphasis on the prophet's call and the relationship 
of prophecy to Israel's religious traditions and social 
institutions. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Hoppe MW 1 1 :30-1 2:45 Winter 

G-ETS 11-601 
Pentateuch 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in the five books of the Torah (The Law, 
Genesis-Deuteronomy). Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. Examples of top- 
ics: The Primeval Story (Gen 1-11), The Exodus 
Narrative (Ex 1-15), Covenant in Genesis- 
Deuteronomy, The Deuteronomic Code. Limit: 15. 
Bird Th Th 8:30- J 0:50 Winter 

Jan. 24-Mar. 18 

MTS B-405 
Yahwist Revolution 

A study of Israel's antecedents, birth as a people, 
and early life as a nation, focusing on Genesis - 
1 Samuel. Attention is given to appropriate critical 
methods for the content and theology of Israel's 
epic tradition, law, and oldest poetry. 
Boling M 6-9 P.M. Winter 

NPTS BlBL-135 

The Faith of the Psalmist 

An appreciation for the faith of Israel (including its 
relationship to New Testament proclamation) is 
presented by means of an exegetical-theological 
study of selected Psalms. Prereq: BIBL-120 and 
BIBL-121 or equiv. 
Holmgren M 740 P.M. Winter 



63 



Old Testament 



NBTS OT 302 

The Former Prophets 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and the- 
ological study of the books of Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel and Kings. Special attention will be given 
to the historical, political, religious, and social 
events that shaped Israelite society. 
Mariottini T 6 : 30- 1 P. M . Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTU SB480 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality: 

Old Testament 

The religion of Israel is investigated not only in its 
historical and biblical setting, but also according to 
its impact upon Christian life and ministry. 
StuhlmueUer T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTSCH413 
Wisdom Literature 

Exploration of the books of Proverbs, Qoheleth, 
Job, Ecclesiasticus, and Wisdom of Solomon. Our 
aim will be further to delinate the alternative world 
view, anthropology, and theology inherent to the 
different trends of wisdom in historical Israel from 
preexilic times until the eve of the Christian era. 
LcCocque T 942:40 Winter 

CTS CH 610 

Pre-Christian Apocalyptic Literature 

This seminar expecially geared towards doctora 
students will explore the rich Apocalyptic litera 
ture found both in the Bible (OT) and in the "out 
side books." Special emphasis upon Daniel, 
Enoch, II Baruch, and IV Esdras. Some aspects wil 
be studied in depth. Considerable student involve 
ment expected. Non-doctoral students need con 
sent of instructor. 
LcCocque Th 9-12:40 Winter 

LSTC B-630 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 11: The Prophets 

An ongoing seminar on the prophetic materials. 

Theme for 1994: the prophet Ezekiel. 

Klein M 12:30-3:45 Winter 

MS B1322 
Creation Texts 

This course concentrates on the exegesis of texts in 



the Hebrew Bible that deal with the topic of cre- 
ation. Texts from the Prophetic and Wisdom litea- 
ture as well as Genesis are studied in close reading 
to come to an understanding of Israels' theology of 
God and Savior as also being God the Creator. 
Schoenstene MTK 1:15-2: 30 Winter 

TEDS OT 706 
Geography of Bible Lands 

Physical geography of Palestine including natural 
regions, political units and geographical history 
since antiquity; identification of ancient sites, and 
a description of the present state of excavation at 
each tell or location. 
Beitzel TBA Winter 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

CTU B 325 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 1 

This is the first part of a two-quarter course which 
studies the grammar and vocabulary of biblical 
Hebrew in order to prepare students to work with 
the Hebrew text. 
Hoppe MTWTh 3:30-4:30 Winter 

G-ETS 11-641 
Elementary Hebrew I 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 
(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 
prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two unit course: 
credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory completion of 
11-642. 

Roth Jan. 3-21 TWTKF 8:30-10:30; Winter 
TWTh 2-4:40 

G-ETS 11-642 
Elementary Hebrew 11 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 

(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 

prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two unit course; 

credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory completion of 

11-642. 

Roth. Jan. 24-Mar. 18 TWTh 3:30-5:30 Winter 

LSTCB-301 
Biblical Hebrew 11 

A continuation of Biblical Hebrew I taught in Fall. 
Michel MW 8: 15-9:50 Winter 



64 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



MTS B-321K#22K 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I, II 

(Taught in Korean) 

(For course description, see MTS B-321/322 in Fall.) 
Han M 2-5 Winter 

Han M 2-5 Spring 

MTS B-430 
Hebrew III: 
Readings in Hebrew Poetry: Isaiah 40-66 

The goal of this course is to read selected portions 
of "Second" and "Third" Isaiah in Hebrew, with 
attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, poetic 
forms and distinctive style of these later segments. 
Structure and theology of these chapters will be 
examined. Prereq: Hebrew 1 and II. 
BoUng TTh 10-1 1:50 Winter 

MS BI302 
Hebrew II 

The course consists of readings and exegesis of 
selected texts from the Pentateuch, Hebrew Sirach, 
the Hebrew Inscriptions and the Dead Sea Scrolls. 
Prereq: Hebrew I or equiv. 
lodge MTh 9:55-1 J :15 Winter 

NPTSBIBL-100 
Beginning Hebrew 1 

Knowledge of basic biblical Hebrew is accom- 
plished through a survey of the grammar, transla- 
tion of selected readings and a study of the regular 
verb system. Four hours. 
Holmgren MTWTh 23 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-103 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-102). 

HaR TBA Winter 

NBTS BL 302LH 
Hebreo 11/Hebrew 11 

(This course is the second quarter of a sequence of 
two quarters. For course descriptiosn, see Fall.) 
Homing TTh 1-2:45 Winter 

S-WTS 01-523S 
Elementary Biblical Hebrew 

The goal of this course will be to enable students to 
approach the Hebrew Bible in its own language 
with some basic confidence and competence. The 
term will include an introduction to the elements 
of grammar and syntax. (A short overview of the 
history and growth of the language will also be 



undertaken.) 1.5 units. Prereq: Introduction to 
Biblical Languages and Exegesis. 
TBA TWThF 8:30-9:20 Post-January Intensive 
andMTWTh 1:20-2:50 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B 305 

New Testament Introduction 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

TBA M W 1 1 -30-1 2:45 Winter 

CTS CH 321 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the origin, interrelationship, and intent 
of the three synoptic gospels. Special attention is 
given to the form and function of a gospel. 
Snyder M 9-12:40 Winter 

G-ETS 12-501 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew-Acts 

Theory and practice of exegesis in relation to 
selected passages, including textual, literary, form- 
and redaction-criticism and the use of programmed 
instruction. Exploration of the theology of the 
evangelists. Presentation of various viewpoints 
through lectures and exegetical section meetings in 
groups. Limit: Winter-48. 

Stegner Jan. 24-Uar. 18 830-10:50 Winter 
Roth TTh 1303:20 Spring 

LSTC B-335 

New Testament: Methods of Study 

An inductive course designed to introduce students 
to the methods of understanding and interpreting 
the New Testament. A variety of methods will be 
used, with emphasis on the use of texts of the New 
Testament to implement the methods and to 
explore their value. Prereq: Greek. 
Krentz MW 2303:45 Winter 

+ disc, sec: Th 1-2 or 23 
Rhoads MW 2303:45 Winter 

+ disc, sec: Th 1-2 or 23 

NPTS BIBL-150 

Interpreting the New Testament 1: 

The Gospels 

In this introductory treatment of the Gospels, 
attention will be given to hermeneutics, critical 
studies, the characteristics and message of each of 



65 



New Testament 



the Gospels, and Jesus' proclamation of Kingdom. 

Four hours. 

Snodgrass MWTh 1 1 :40- 1 2 :55 Winter 

NPTS B1BL-250 

Interpreting the New Testament II : 

Acts-Revelation 

This course is an introduction to the New 
Testament texts from Acts through Revelation 
with special emphasis on historical, sociological, 
literary and hermeneutical issues of the interpreta- 
tion of these texts. Four hours. 
Belleville MWTh 10:1541 :30 Winter 

Scholer M 7-10 P.M. Winter 



justification. Contemporary relevance for 
Prostestant theology and ethics. Prereq: 12-502. 
Limit: 12. 
Jewett Jan. 24-Mar. 18 T 7-10 p.m. Winter 

MTS B-403 
Epistles of Paul 

An introduction to the seven undisputed authentic 
letters of Paul. The course emphasizes understand- 
ing the rhetorical function of Paul's letters in light 
of the sociological setting implicit in the letters. 
Some attention is also given to hermeneutical 
implications. 



Brawley 



TTK 10-1 1:50 



Winter 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-436 

Acts of the Apostles 

A study of the book of Acts with special attention 
to the literary genre of Luke-Acts, the shape and 
function of the stories the author narrates, and the 
overarching understanding of the role the church 
plays in the drama of biblical history. 
Gardner Jan. 24-Mar. 18 F 9-12 Winter 

CTU B 440 

The Gospel According to John 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall structure 
and content. Key sections will be used to highlight 
such major Johannine motifs as religious symbol- 
ism, sacraments, community and spirituality. 
Prereq: B 305 or equiv. 
Reid MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU B 443 

Revelation and Letters of John 

Thematic and exegetical study of the revelation or 
apocalypse and the Letters of John from the per- 
spectives of history, culture, understanding of 
church, apocalyptic and epistolary genres and con- 
temporary interpretation. Prereq: B305 or equiv. 
LaVerdiere 9-12; 1-4:30 Winter 

Mar. 12; Mar. 26; Apr. 30; May 14 

G-ETS 12-608 
Galatians 

Critical study with attention to form and rhetoric 
of the letter, identity of anti-Pauline opponents, 
and theological motifs such as freedom, law, and 



NPTS B1BL- 157 
The Gospel of John 

This course is an examination of John's distinctive 
presentation of life and teaching of Jesus. The focus 
will be on Jesus' interaction with individuals and 
groups of diverse religious, economic, social, politi- 
cal and educational backgrounds. The course will 
explore theological and practical implications for 
the church today. 
Snodgrass W 2-5 Winter 

NPTS BIBL- 178 
Revelation 

This course is an exegetical study of the New 
Testament apocalypse of John. Attention is given 
to issues of genre, socio-historical setting, purpose, 
cultural-religious contexts and the variety of inter- 
pretations of Revelation in the church. 
Scholer W2-5 Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 537 

Women in the Gospel of Luke 

A seminar on the passages in the Gospel of Luke in 
which women figure. Includes women in the infan- 
cy narratives, Galilean women followers and minis- 
ters, women in Jesus' teaching. Method will be 
both historical-critical and feminist- liberation ist. 
Reid T 1-3:30 Winter 

CTS CH 435 

Parable in the New Testament 

The parables of Jesus will be examined in terms of 
their original context and the present context. 
Snyder W 942:40 Winter 



66 



New Testament 



G-ETS 12/13-681 
Biblical Archaeology: 
Excavation at Tel Nessana 

The contribution of Ancient Near Eastern and 
especially Palestinian archaeology to the interpre- 
tation of the Bible. Travel seminar; see p. 15. 
Groh Jan. 3-21 Winter 

LSTC B-660 

Graduate Biblical Seminar V: Paul 

An ongoing seminar on the Pauline materials. 

Theme for 1994: 1 Thessalonians and Philippians 

in the light of local history, cultural setting, and 

relevant ancient and modern literature. (For post- 

M.Div. students. Admission of others by consent of 

instructor.) 

Krentz T 1-4:30 Winter 

MTS B-439 
Parables of Jesus 

This course emphasizes twentieth-century exegeti- 
cal and hermeneutical methods for interpreting 
and appropriating the parables of Jesus. Prereq: B- 
300 or equiv. 
Brawley W 6-9 P.M. Winter 

NPTS B1BL-280 

Women, the Bible and the Church 

This course focuses on the New Testament texts 
which bear on the roles and status of women in the 
early church and includes reflection on a wide 
range of hermeneutical, historical and theological 
perspectives relevant to the issues of women and 
ministry in the church today. 
Scholer Jan. 1 7-May 9 TTh 1 :30~3:30 Winter 

NBTS CTNT 400 

The Color of Christ: Christianity, Racism and 

the American Revoluntionary Tradition 

This interdisciplinary course examines the role of 
the Bible and Christianity in the history of racism 
and revolution in America. The uses of the Bible 
by the white establishment to support slavery and 
the counter-racist interpretations of the Bible and 
Christian faith put forward by African-Americans 
will be studied, along with the black contribution 
to the American revolutionary tradition. Special 
consideration will be given to questions of 
hermeneutics in the use of the Bible, the U.S. 
Constitution, and the Declaration of 
Independence. 
Congrove W 1-4:30 Winter 



TEDS NT 845 

Sociological Approaches to the New Testament 

A description and evaluation of the various socio- 
logical approaches to the New Testament in con- 
temporary scholarship. Student work and presenta- 
tions will focus on methodology as found in recent 
studies regarding Jesus and the Gospels. Course 
procedure will be in seminar form, with students 
presenting papers and interacting with one anoth- 
er. 
McKnight TBA Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 
CTUB321 

Biblical Greek 11 

A continuation of B 320, introduction to the gram- 
mar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. 
Students will begin to read portions of the New 
Testament text in Greek with introductory atten- 
tion to exegesis. 
Bowe TWTh 8:30-9:30 Winter 

G-ETS 12-642 
Elementary Greek 11 

Essential forms and principles of New Testament 
Greek. Two-units, credit for 12-641 after satisfacto- 
ry completion of 1 2-642. 
Stegner Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TWTh 3:30-5:30 Winter 

LSTC B-308 
Biblical Greek 11 

A continuation of Biblical Greek I. Completion of 
Greek Grammar. Extensive reading in New 
Testament texts. 

Rhoads MW 1-2:15 Winter 

TBA MW 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC/MTS B-324H/B-325H 

Griego 1 (Greek l)/Griego 11 (Greek II) 

Este curso se compone de dos partes que son com- 
plementarias y se ofreen en una secuencia de dos 
trimestres. Quienes participan de una de las sec- 
ciones necesitan tomar la otra. Se hara un estudio 
de la gramatica griega, se haran practicas de traduc- 
cion y se le dara atencion de manera introductoria 
a la exegesis. 

Vena TTh 6-8 P.M. Winter 

Vena TTh 6-8 P.M. Spring 

MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek 1, II 

Study of elementary Greek grammar, practice in 




67 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



translation, with introductory attention to exegesis. 
A non-divisible course of two quarters. 
Mount Sec. 1 TWTK 8:45-9:50 Winter 

Mount Sec. 2 MW 23:50 Winter 

Mount Sec. 1 TWTK 8:45-9:50 Spring 

Mount Sec.2MW 2-3 :50 Spring 



tion vis-a-vis the non-Christian world, developing 
institutional church structures and practice, theo- 
logical and doctrinal disputes - all viewed within 
the context of the social world of the early 
Christians. 
Bovue TW 1-2:15 Winter 



MTS B-324K/325K 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

(Taught in Korean) 

(For course description, see B-324/325 above.) 
Cha T 9-1 1:50 Winter 

Cha T 9-1 1:50 Spring 

NPTS BIBL-099 

Beginning New Testament Greek II 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-098.) 

Katter MTWTh 2:30-3:20 Winter 

NPTSBIBL-113 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-112.) 

Belleville TBA Winter 

S-WTS 02-523GS 
Elementary Greek 

An intensive introduction to the grammar, vocabu- 
lary and translation of the Greek language as it is 
employed in the New Testament and early 
Christian texts. 1.5 units. 

Pervo TWTKF 8:30-9:20 Post-January Intensive 
and MTWTh 1:20-2:50 

TEDS NT702 

Advanced Greek Grammar 

History of the development of the Greek language 
from Homer to modern Greek and studies in Greek 
syntax and New Testament exegesis with special 
reference to the standard grammars. 
Carson TBA Winter 



HISTORICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU H 300 

History of Early Christianity 

A study of the development of the Christian move- 
ment to the Council of Chalcedon in 451 C.E. 
Major themes will include Christian self-identifica- 



CTS CH 345 

History of Christian Thought 11 

From the Reformation through the twentieth cen- 
tury. A survey of significant theological move- 
ments, with attention to their social context. (This 
course may be elected independently of History of 
Christian Thought 1). 
Stebner M 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity II 

Major issues, ideas, events, and persons in the his- 
tory of the Church from the eleventh century 
through the seventeenth century; emphasis on late 
medieval Christianity and origins of Protestantism. 
Limit: 45 Winter, 35 Spring. 
Stein Jan. 24 -Mar. 18 TTh 1-3:20 Winter 

Stein MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Spring 

LSTC H-330 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and modern 
church history outside America, designed to show 
in broad perspective the movements which have 
shaped world Christianity in our time. Lectures and 
discussion of selected source readings. 
Hendel MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

LSTCH-331 

Reformation, Orthodoxy, Pietism 

A survey of European church history from 1500 to 
1750, permitting more thorough study of the 
Reformation in its multiple expression than in the 
course H-330. The age of Orthodoxy and conti- 
nental Pietism will also receive careful attention. 
KiUinger MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS H-300 

Transformations of Christianity 

(Korean emphasis: bilingual support) 

(For course description, see MTS H-300 in Fall.) 
Sawyer T 6-9 P.M. Winter 

NPTSHIST-111 

Christian Heritage 11: The Modern Church 

A basic introduction to the history of the Christian 
church is continued in this study from the 
Reformation to the present. Special attention will 
focus on the institutional and theological diversity 



68 



Historical Studies 



of the modern church in its cultural settings. Four 

hours credit. 

Graham MWTK 8-9 : 1 5 Winter 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

CTUH313 

From Trent to Vatican II 

A study of key issues in Catholicism of the last four 
centuries: the mentality following the Reformation; 
Jansenism; an introduction to Newman and the 
Oxford Movement; the cultural forces that influ- 
enced Vatican I; Modernism and its reaction; perti- 
nent problems of the twentieth century. Limit: 15. 
TBA MW 1 1 -3042:45 Winter 

CTU H 430 

Vatican II and the Post-Vatican Church 

Part one of the course will concentrate on the 
issues of Vatican II: liturgy, collegiality, laity, reli- 
gious life, ecumenism and religious liberty, revela- 
tion. The second part will examine key issues in 
the modern church to see if Vatican II responds to 
them. Limit: 10. 
Ross . MW 2:303:45 Winter 

CTS CH 390B 

United Methodist History 

A historical study of American Methodism which 
will help the student understand, evaluate and 
appropriate the United Methodist tradition in the 
light of its antecedents and contexts. 
Euzns Th 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

LSTC H-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are norma- 
tive for Lutheran ministry and church life today. 
Recent confessional statements and results of inter- 
confessional dialogues are taken into account. 
Prereq: Unity and Diversity and H-330 or H-331 or 
equiv. 

Scherer TTK 2:253:40 Winter 

Hendel MTh 10:45-12 Spring 

Pero M 33:50; W 3-4:40 Spring 

MTS H-485H 

Historia de la Iglesia Hispana en los E.E.U.U. 

(History of the Hispanic Church in the United 

States) 

El curso introducira al alumno a los origenes, desar- 

rollo y estado actual de las Iglesias hispanas en los 



E.E.U.U. Se pondra enfasis en la desarrollo de sus 
teologias, asi como las distintas eclesiologias que le 
han dado concrecion historica. 
Rodriguez-Diaz W 13:50 Winter 

M/L H 395 

Unitarian Universalis! History and Polity 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Godbey/Staff Jan. 17-21 9-5 Winter 

M/L H 432 

Seminar: The Radical Reformation 

A study of the Anabaptist, Spiritualist and 
Evangelical Rationalist/antitrinitarian movements 
in the sixteenth centuries in the light of recent 
studies of these movements. Each student will pre- 
pare and present a paper on the theological influ- 
ence of a leader or of a major issue in the Radical 
Reformation. 
Godbey TBA Winter 

S-WTS 03-508S 
Anglicanism I 

Christianity in the British Isles from the 
Reformation to the Age of Reason, with special 
attention to the variety of traditions developing 
within, and dissenting from, the established 
English church. 
Haugaard MTWTh 3:15-4:45 Winter 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent to Luther's theology in its broad comprehen- 
siveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected works in 
various categories are discussed. 
Hendel MW 2:303:45 Winter 

MTS H/T-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study of Calvin's thelogy as seen pri- 
marily in the Institutes of the Christian Religion. 
DeVries MW 10-11 :50 Winter 

NPTSHSTX-135 
Theology of Luther 

Through reading, research and discussion this semi- 
nar examines selected treatises of Luther with par- 
ticular reference to major doctrinal themes of the 
Reformation set in their historical context. 
P.Anderson W 2-5 Winter 



69 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 
BTS H-443 
American Religious History 

The development of civil religion in the United 
States in terms of American church history. 
Wagner Jan. 24-Mar. 18 W 3-6:30 Winter 

LSTCH-350A 
American Church History 

The development of religious ideas, movements, 
and institutions in North America from colonial 
times to the present. The variety of religious 
expressions in the United States is discussed, with 
special emphasis on American Lutheranism. 
Prereq: Unity and Diversity and H-360, H-330 or 
H-331. 
Sawyer MW 1-2:15 Winter 

NBTS CTNT 400 

The Color of Christ: Christianity, Racism and 

the American Revoluntionary Tradition 

(For course description, see New Testament Studies 

III.) 

Cosgrove W 14:30 Winter 

V. SELECT TOPICS IN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

G-ETS 13-615 

The Sacraments and Spiritual Formation 

Study of the theological interpretation of Baptism 
and the Lord's supper in the Church's past; focus 
on the sacramental life as a resource for the spiritu- 
al formation of contemporary Christians. Limit: 16. 
Stein Jan. 24-Mar. 18 Winter 

W 9-10:50; F 9-1 1:50 

MTS H-437 

Christian Understanding of Sin 

Will explore the fundamental notion of sin as a 
presupposition of the Christian understanding of 
grace. Topics will include: 1 ) scriptural language for 
sin; 2) metaphors for sin; 3) sin and conscience; 4) 
original and actual sin; 5) classifications of sins; 6) 
unforgiveable sin; 7) sin and evil; 8) critical 
appraisal of doctrines of sin. 
DeVries Th9-ll:50 Winter 



monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We 
will consider the historical context of monasticism, 
examine its theological content primarily through 
contemporary writings and assess its impact on the 
Church's life and spirituality. 
Hennessey MTH 1:15-2:30 Winter 

MSH1417 

Christian Archaeology 

A study of early Christian inscriptions and paint- 
ings with a view to establishing the belief and litur- 
gical practice of Christian people at Rome during 
the first six centuries. 
Meyer MTh 1 : 15-2:30 Winter 

NPTS HSTX-224 
Early Christian Fathers 

This seminar includes readings and research on the 
development of Christian doctrine in the Eastern 
and Western fathers during the first six centuries of 
the church. 
P.Anderson M 7-10 P.M. Winter 

NBTS CH 410 
Women Leaders in the 
Pre-Reformation Churches 

This course focuses on reading, researching, and 
writing about the women leaders in the Pre- 
Reformation churches in order for these women to 
once again become a part of the standard history of 
the Christian Church. 
Rodgerson Pleasants M 3-6:30 P.M. Winter 

TEDS CH 761 
The Enlightenment 

Religious life and thought during the eighteenth 
century with special consideration of Deism and 
efforts by orthodox Christians to counter this 
philosophical tendency. 
Woodbridge TBA Winter 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 



MSH1316 

The Fathers and Mothers of the Desert: A Study 

in Early Christian Life, Thought and Spirit 

This course will examine the rise of Christian 



CTU D 325 
Introduction to Theology 

(For course description, see Fall. 
Unnan M 7-9:30 P.M. 



Winter 



10 



Theological Studies 



CTS CH 345 

History of Christian Thought II 

(For course description, see Historical Studies I.) 
Stebner M 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology 1 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Will Jan. 24-Uar. 18 Winter 

W9-10:50;F9-11:50 

G-ETS 21-502 
Systematic Theology 11 

Christian understanding of Jesus the Christ, salva- 
tion, the Holy Spirit, church, ministry, and sacra- 
ments. Prereq: 21-501. Limit: 30. 
Young Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTh 840:50 Winter 
WiU TTh 1:30-3 :20 Spring 

LSTCT-312 
Christian Theology 11 

For description of the Christian Theology 
sequence, see Christian Theology I (Fall). The sec- 
ond course in the sequence deals with the human 
condition (including sin and evil) and the Person 
and Work of Christ. 
Hefner MW 1-2:15 Winter 

+ disc. sec. W 2:20-3:10 
WestheUe MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS T-300 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

An introduction to the contents, methods, and 
resources of coherent and responsible Christian 
thinking. Attention will be given to understanding 
and interpreting basic Christian doctrines (e.g., 
God, Christ, Spirit, Church). The course will 
include lectures, discussions, readings, and special 
projects. 
Parker etal. M 6-9 P.M. Winter 

NPTS THEO-200 
Introduction to Theology 

Students are given an introduction both to theo- 
logical methodology (the use of Scripture, tradi- 
tion, culture and experience) and to selected fig- 
ures in nineteenth and twentieth century theology. 
Four hours credit. 
Bouma-Prediger M WTh 8-9 : 1 5 Winter 

NPTSTHEO-301 
Systematic Theology 11 

The foundation of human existence, salvation and 
hope in the triune God whose work is creation, 
redemption and sanctification. Four hours credit. 
Weborg MWTh 1 1 -.40-12:55 Winter 



NBTS1N311H 

Evangel izac ion, Salvacion y Justica 

(Evangelization, Salvation & Justice) 

Curso para enstudiantes nuevos/as. Introduccion a 
preocupaciones e intereses basicos de la educacion 
teologica. Se examinaran realidades y temas con- 
temporaneos sobre la interrelacion indivisible entre 
envangelizacion y justica. Esto, para considerar la 
imperativa interaccion de los estudios biblicos, 
historicos, teologicos y de correlacion, y su influen- 
cia en la formacion ministerial. 
Mottesi T 6:30-10 P.M. Winter 

NBTSTH301 
Faith and Theology 

This course will introduce the student to the major 
doctrines in contemporary theology. The historical 
and traditional engagements with theological issues 
will be correlated with the student's own confes- 
sion of faith and the theological foundations for 
the practice of ministry. 
Sharp M 3-6:30 Winter 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS T-435 
Quakerism 

Students will read from basic secondary and prima- 
ry sources such as The Journal of George Fox, 
Barclay's Apology, Kelly's Testament of Devotion, 
Woolman's Journal. The readings will be processed 
as possible in the spirit and style of Quaker devo- 
tional life. 
Brown Jan. 24 -Mar. 18 Winter 

BTS T-457 

Brethen In Theological Perspective 

Theological presuppositions of Brethren historiog- 
raphy and development will be examined, and pre- 
sent theological trends will be traced. The doc- 
trines and practices of the Brethren will be dis- 
cussed in dialog with contemporary thought. 
Current issues will be delineated. 
Brown Jan. 3-14 MF 8-12 Winter 

CTU C 465 

Toward a Theology of Ministry in the 

Hispanic Community 

For two decades U.S. Hispanic Catholic leadership 
has been involved in a community-rooted process 
of reflection, exploring its concepts of church and 
ministry. This course will explore the 
historical/theological dimensions responsible for 



71 



Theological Studies 



the emerging concept of ministry among Hispanic 

leadership. 

Pineda W 10-12:30 Winter 

CTU D 576 

Black Theology in Dialogue 

This seminar will critically examine the historical 
roots, meaning, methods, content and develop- 
ment of Black Theology in the United States and 
its dialogue with African, Latin American and 
Feminist Liberation theologies. Implications for 
church mission and ministry will be addressed. 
Phelps T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 21-634 

Theology of Howard Thurman 

Systematic study of central theological motifs in 
Thurman's thought; attention to his theological 
methods in the understanding of mysticism, God, 
self, Christology, eschatology, evil, community and 
the spirituals. Prereq: 21-502 and 21-503. 
Young Jan. 24-Uar. 1 8 TTK 3:30-5 -30 Winter 

LSTC T-434 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

An in-depth analysis of the theology and praxis of 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., wrestling with the 

philosophical and theological principles he 

employed and their relevance in today's theological 

marketplace. 

Pero M 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

MTS T/H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

(For course description, see Historical Studies 111.) 
DeVries MW 104 1 :50 Winter 

MS SY335 

The Theology of John Henry Newman 

Newman, proved to be one of the most important 
influences at the Second Vatican Council. His 
emphases on the development of doctrine and on 
the role of the laity in the determination of the 
Church's faith, proved decisive in the contempo- 
rary Church's self-understanding. This course will 
explore Newman's life and work through a careful 
study of his autobiography, Apologia pro Vita Sua, 
his central epistemological work, The Grammar e of 
Assent, and his remarkable The Development of 
Christian Doctrine. 
Barron TF 1:15-2:30 Winter 

NBTS TH 433 
Contemporary Perspectives in 
African-American Theology 

In this course, students will study explicit theologi- 



cal concepts in the writings of James Cone and 

others. Attention will be given to the documentary 

history of African-American theology and critical 

responses. 

Butler TH 6:30-10 P.M. Winter 

NBTS TH 47 2H 

Hacia una Cristologia Iberoamericana 

Escobar Jan. 3-7 9-12; 2-5 Winter 

TEDS ST 772 

Seminar: Theology of Wolfhart Pannenberg 

Seminar on the work and writing of an important 

theologian of the present. 

Rommen TBA Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

BTS T-456 
Evangelical Spirituality 

This course will center on a typology of spirituality 
comparing biblical or prophetic spirituality with 
classical mysticism on the one hand and the new 
mysticism of the each on the other. Special atten- 
tion would be given to the nature of love. 
Bloesch Jan. 344 MF8-11 Winter 

BTS T-462 
Christology 

A cluster of doctrinal issues central to the church's 
understandings of the person and work of Christ 
studied from the perspectives of their cultural con- 
tents and historical development. Each student for- 
mulates a personal christological statement tested 
in relation to the Bible and church tradition in dia- 
log with other class participants. 
Groff Jan. 24-Mar. 18 TTK 940:45 Winter 

CTU CD456 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity 

This course will explore the images of God domi- 
nant in pre-Columbian religious traditions, those 
present in current Hispanic religiosity and their 
interrelationship; it will then engage these images 
in a dialogue with those proposed by representative 
North Atlantic theologies. 
Riebe-Estrella W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU D 430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become problematic 
for contemporary society is followed by a critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to 



72 



Theological Studies 



respond to this problem. This course helps students 
evaluate their experience and respond intelligently 
to the modern problem of God. 
Hayes TTh 1041:15 Winter 

CTU D 440 
Christology 

A study of the foundational questions of 
Christology in the light of the critical, historical 
study of Scripture and the theological tradition. 
Hayes MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTU D 441 
Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ inter- 
acts with cultural processes. Special attention is 
given to the New Testament and Patristic periods, 
and also to contemporary movements in the world 
church today. 
Schreiter TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU D 444 

Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 

A study of the origins of ordained ministry in the 
early church, its gradual transformation as the 
church became a political power, its reformation in 
the sixteenth century, its image from the seven- 
teenth to the twentieth century and its renewal at 
Vatican Council II. 
Linnan TTh 11 -3042 :45 Winter 

CTU D 449 

Marian Dogmas and Symbols 

The church is of the faithful, for the faithful, by the 
faithful, but in Christ: people responding to God 
and participating in community. Faith can only be 
expressed in the symbols of differing ages and cul- 
tures. Mary of the Gospel and tradition mast be 
understood in our situation. In this course we 
examine the religious symbols that gave rise to 
Marian dogmas. 
Brennan TTh 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU D 610 
Theological Antropology: 

Cross -Cultural Perspective 

A seminar exporing the challenges raised to classi- 
cal themes in theological anthropology by the vari- 
ety of cultures in the world church. 
Schreiter T 1330 Winter 

CTU DS 555 

God, Grace and Church: 

Trinitarian Foundations of Christian Spiritualities 

A seminar designed to explore the significance of 
the Incarnation, the indwelling of the Spirit and 



the Church as mediating the Trinitarian life of 
grace and therefore as fundamental contituents of a 
Christian approach to the spiritual life which is 
essentially both ecclesial and worldly. 
Linnan T 2-30-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 404 
The Holy Spirit 

A consideration of exegetical, classical and theo- 
logical resources for the development of a clearer 
understanding of the Holy Spirit as the "Third 
Person of the Trinity" and as operative in history, 
church and life. 
Jennings W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTS TEC 525 

Homosexuality in Theoretical and 

Ethical Perspective 

A consideration of gay and lesbian experience in 
the light of historical, cross-cultural and psycho- 
social theory provides the basis for theological/ethi- 
cal reflection. 
Jennings T 942:40 Winter 

CTS TEC 561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A seminar designed to assist the advanced student 
in the task of pastoral diagnostics. A phenomeno- 
logical examination of psychopathology will be the 
occasion for theological reflection on the nature 
and dynamics of alienation, sin, and evil as mani- 
fest in human personality. 
Moore W 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 605 

Twentieth Century Theology 

Seminar for advanced degree students covering sig- 
nificant developments in theology in the twentieth 
century. Focus on the emergence of new voices and 
the theological precedents for them. 
This tlewcdte Th 9-1 2:40 Winter 

G-ETS 21-681 A 

Eastern Europe: 

The Vision and Praxis of Shalom 

Peace and justice issues in contemporary develop- 
ments in Russia and Russian-American relations. 
Travel seminar; see p. 14. 
Will Jan. 1-21 Winter 

G-ETS 21-681 B 

Liberation Theology: Haiti and Cuba 

An intensive course studying Christian communi- 
ties and the cultural/political context of Haiti and 
Cuba. Travel seminar; see p. 15. 
Ruether Jan. 5-21 Winter 



73 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-433 

Theology of Art as Theology 

A four-week full course exploring the theology of 
art and the possiblity of art as theology. Units: his- 
torical, cross-cultural, and universal motifs; 
Christian context for imaging; catacombs to 
Renaissance; worship as context for imaging; defin- 
ing sacred space; the city as context for imaging. 
Caemmerer Feb. 14- Mar. 10 Winter 

MTTh 7-9:50 P.M. 

LSTC T-456 

Epic of Creation: Scientific and Religious 

Perspectives on our Origins 

This course will present the story of the origins and 
development of the universe, life, and humans. 
Participants will be encouraged to develop (1) an 
understanding of the relation between contempo- 
rary scientific and theological perspectives on our 
place in the scheme of things, and (2) interpreta- 
tions of the scientific and religious materials in 
ways which take the former seriously and yet are 
fruitful for communicating the faith of the latter. 
Gilbert M 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 



MTS T-439 

God, Suffering and Evil 

If God is good and all-powerful, why is there so 
much suffering and evil in the world? Various 
attempts to answer this question (Augustine, 
Irenaeus, Hartshorne) will be considered and eval- 
uated as the theological problems which the ques- 
tion raises are explored. Prereq: T-300 or equiv. 
Case- Winters T 1-3:50 Winter 

MSSY317 

Christology in a Pluralistic Age 

The purpose of this course is to study contemporary 
Christian attitudes to the significance of Jesus 
Christ in the encounter with other world religions 
and to reflect upon the relationship between inter- 
religious dialogue and Christology. The awareness 
of the authentic power of other religious traditions 
is prodding many Christians to fresh interpreta- 
tions of Christian doctrines, symbols, and presup- 
positions. In this course students should gain an 
understanding of the issues involved in religious 
pluralism and their importance for Christology. 
Lefebure MTh 8:25-9:45 Winter 



LSTC T-576 

Christian Faith and Scientific Worldview 

This course will focus on the question of how the 
Christian faith is to be articulated in the context of 
scientific knowledge. Several classic works in the 
field will serve as the starting point. Suitable at 
both M.Div. and doctoral levels for preaching and 
theological construction. 
Hefner T 8:30-9:45; 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC T-603 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Nineteenth Century Foundations: 

SchJeiermacher 

A seminar for graduate students on a thinker who 
influenced the development of theology in the 
nineteenth century and set the stage or current 
modes of thought. First in a series of required semi- 
nars for doctoral students in theology. 
Busse T 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

MTS T-303K 

Readings in Theology (Taught in Korean) 

This course is designed to help students to develop 
ability and confidence in reading contemporary 
theological discussions in English and to encourage 
them to reflect critically upon contemporary theo- 
logical issues. The students will be assessed for the 
progress they will make in their ability to read the- 
ological texts in English. 
Chun M 9-1 1:50 Winter 



MS SY380 

Liturgy of the Hours 

This course will begin with an historical survey of 
the development of the liturgy of the hours from its 
Old Testament antecedents, through its form in the 
early Church, the emergence of monastic and 
cathedral forms, Eastern and Western practices, 
and its eventual reduction to a clerical discipline in 
the west. We will consider the reform of Vatican II 
with its hope of retrieving the liturgy of the hours 
as the "prayer of the Church." Throughout, the 
goal of the course will be to appropriate the liturgy 
of the hours as a manifestation of ecclesial spiritu- 
ality. 
Fischer MTh 9 .55-1 1:15 Winter 

NBTS TH 420 
Theology in Context 

This course will examine the ways socio-cultural 
environments shape theological and biblical under- 
standing in the community of faith. Attention will 
be given to those theological constructions rooted 
in particular socio-cultural environments. Prereq: 
TH301.TH302. 
Sharp M 6-30-10 P.M. Winter 

S-WTS 05-522S 

Neo-Orthodoxy: Kierkegaard to Bonhoeffer 

An introductory course offering a careful examina- 
tion of some five highly influential works of con- 
temporary theology. Representative authors consid- 



74 



Ethical Studies 



ered include S. Kierkegaard, R. Otto, M. Buber, K. 
Barth, and D. Bonhoeffer. 

Stevenson MT WTh Post-January Intensive 

3:15-4:45 

S-WTS 16-502S 
Theological Bibliography 

A systematic examination of bibliographies in bib- 
lical studies, church history, liturgies and pastoral 
ministry. Attention will be given to classification 
and subject headings in theological libraries. One 
half unit. 
Smith TTh 1:20-2:50 Post-January Intensive 

SCUPE B-TH 302 

Biblical Theology of the City 

Drawing from recent theological work on the bibli- 
cal language of power, this course will seek to get at 
the city, its systems, and ministries by way of an 
understanding of the 'principalities and powers. 1 A 
range of urban powers and the spirit of the city will 
be examined. The assumption is that to address the 
city or to transform it, requires an awareness of its 
'interior aspect. 1 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Ke Hermann T A.M. Winter 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E 370 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Nairn MW 10-11: 1 5 Winter 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Malcolm TTh 1-2:15 Winter 

II. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E 456 

The Ethics of Thomas Aquinas 

This course is a study in the moral theology of 
Aquinas. It examines his understanding of human 
action, his concept of happiness and his description 
of charity as friendship with God. Particular atten- 
tion is given to his treatise on the passions, the 
virtues and the gifts of the Spirit. Prereq: E 370 or 
equiv. 
WadeU MW 2-30-3:45 Winter 



CTU E 481 

Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, especially 
in unmarried Christians. It will investigate the 
moral tradition, the elements which form a con- 
temporary Christian vision of sexuality and how 
these relate to sexual conduct. 
Nairn TTh 1 1 30-1 2:45 Winter 

CTU E 551 

Spirituality/Liturgy and the Quest for Justice 

An examination of various models for linking spiri- 
tuality/liturgy and the church's social justice mis- 
sion. Included are contemporary reinterpretations 
of the Ignatian Exercises, Thomas Merton, feminist 
perspectives, liberationist spirituality, and eco-cen- 
tered spirituality. 
PaAvlikxuski W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTS TEC 525 

Homosexuality in Theoretical 
and Ethical Perspective 

(For course description, see Theological Studies III.) 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Winter 

G-ETS 22-633 

Religious Issues in American Film 

Examinations of classic American films in their 

cultural, historical and religious contexts. Emphasis 

on applying theological assessments to discover 

what has been happening in American culture and 

films. 

Mohan TTK 3:30-5:30 Winter 

G-ETS 22-638 
Thomas Merton: 
Contemplative and Social Critic 

Examination and seminar discussion of a represen- 
tative sample of Merton's writings, focusing on his 
growing understanding of contemplation, locating 
major themes and issues in his linkage of contem- 
plation and social criticism. 
Eugene W 9-10:50; F 9-1 1 :50 Winter 

G-ETS 22-641 

African-American Critical Thought 

Examination of developing critical thought of 
African-Americans in the nineteenth and twenti- 
eth centuries as they came to understand their "sit- 
uation," carved out discussion space to develop 
constructive theoretical and practical responses to 
the cultural and social crises in the U.S., and 
brought creative alternatives to the meanings and 
values of the environment that is the U.S.A. 
Eugene TTh 1-3:20 Winter 




75 



Ethical Studies 



Religion and Society Studies 



MTS E-404 

Contemporary Christian Political Ethics 

This course examines contemporary Christian 
political ethics, using authors whose approaches to 
the subject differ as ethical decisions differ. It 
examines underlying assumptions the authors used, 
methodologies, and positions on such questions as 
the proper role of the Church in politics and the 
relation of the Christian community to the state. 
HadseU W 1-3:50 Winter 

MTSE/M-431 

The Churches and the City: 

Ethical Issues in Urban Ministry 

Study of the ministries of churches and church- 
related agencies in cultural contexts in the Chicago 
area. Attention to economic, political, cultural, 
religious structures and dynamics that challenge 
urban ministry; empirical and normative analyses 
of issues of care and justice engaging these church- 
es; resources for theological reflection and transfor- 
mational practice. 
Livezey T 3-5:50 Winter 

MSM0319(M-5) 
Business Ethics 

The business world today which operates under the 
capitalist theory puts great emphasis on the unre- 
strained right of individuals and business to pursue 
their own economic self-interest. Thus, the princi- 
ples and values which flourish in the world of busi- 
ness and its practices in the light of Christian val- 
ues and principles, employing lecture, discussion 
and case study methods. 
Boyle TF 1:15-230 Winter 

S-WTS 08-603S 
Problem in Ethics 

Focusing on specific moral problems, moral argu- 
ments will be evaluated including assessments of 
theological assumptions, practical moral reasoning, 
use of technical data, and understandings of the 
task of the church. 
Sedgwick MTWTh 3:15-4:45 Post-January Intensive 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course decription, see Fall.) 

TBA Jan. 24-Uar. 18 W 1-2:20 Winter 



CTU E 425 

World Poverty, Development and 

Life's Liberation 

A theological investigation and assessment of the 
division of the world into rich and poor countries. 
Poverty, development and liberation as socio-polit- 
ical phenomena will be studied in the light of 
Scripture and Catholic social teaching. Their 
embodiment of today's kcdros for Christian commu- 
nities will provide the focus. 
Fornasari MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU E 545 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

An exploration of the relation of Christian life to 
political life. The origin, place and role of con- 
science in both will be investigated. Conscience 
will be related to the historical realities of commu- 
nity and tradition and to the unity of theory and 
practice proper to political conscience. 
Fornasari T 1-3:30 Winter 

CTS I 461 

Health Ministries Seminar 

This multi-disciplinary seminar focuses on system 
assessment, planned change and empowerment for 
shaping systems as an advocate at local, regional, 
national and international levels. Limited enroll- 
ment. 
CukrfDahrn/MainorfMcDermou TBA Winter 

G-ETS 22-502 

The Church and Social Systems 

Outline of stances taken by churches toward soci- 
ety in different contexts. Various types of social sys- 
tems, such as partriarch, racism, liberal domocracy, 
socialism, economic neocolonialism, and mili- 
tarism. Formulation of ethical priciples for 
Christian relations to these social systems and 
models of ministry. 

Ruether Jan. 24 -Mar. IS Winter 

TTh3:30-5:30 

LSTC M-370 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Folk W 2:30-5 Winter 

SCUPEM300 

January Term in Chicago 

January term is designed to integrate an academic 
understanding of urban systems with the practical 
experience of living within an ethnic community 
affected by such systems. Chicago is a microcosm of 
the world. The various political and economic 



76 



World Mission Studies 



dynamics which are played out of a worldwide stage 
can be sampled in the ethnic neighborhoods. 
Students will live and work in an ethnic neighbor- 
hood taking course work at the SCUPE offices. 
Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Cooper Jan. 3-21 Winter 

SCUPE S-H 302 

Tran forming Urban Systems 

Urban pastors and congregations often must con- 
front the social, economic and political systems 
that affect citizens' quality of life. This course 
examines these systems in individual communities 
and the metropolitan region as a whole and seeks 
to find new ways of transformating them when nec- 
essary. 4 hours. Fees may apply, see p. 19. 
Cooper T/iA.M. Winter 

TEDS PT 723 

Social and Cultural Exegesis 

This course will equip the student to do theologi- 
cally informed analysis of the social and cultural 
context of modern urban society. Special attention 
will be given to formulating a biblically informed 
understanding of modernization, urbanization, and 
secularization, with a view to understanding the 
difference and relationship between various 
change-producing ministries ranging from evange- 
lism to political involvement. 
Speer TBA Winter 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 



CTU C 409 

Mission on the Margins: 

Homelessness in the City 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Gittins TBA Winter 

CTU C 508 

Mission Studies IV: Issues in Mission Theology 

Assesses "top down" and "bottom up" approaches 
using Roman and ecumenical documents and iden- 
tifying the missionary task. Topics include local 
churches, liberation, proclamation and missionary 
identity. 
Gittins Th 1042:30 Wnter 



CTU C 548 

Witchcraft and Sorcery in Pastoral Perspective 

Missionaries cannot ignore or misunderstand the 
sociological reality of "sorcery/witchcraft." This 
course searches that reality for gospel values. 
Prereq: instructor's permission, C 411 or equiv. 
Gittins T 1042-30 Winter 

CTU CW570 

Comparative Ritual: Christianity in Asia 

A comparative study of ritual activity of faith tradi- 
tions in Asia with Christian rites and symbols and 
their capacity to express the mystery of the Gospel 
in Asian terms. 
Kaserow W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU D 610 

Theological Anthropology: 

Cross-Cultural Perspective 

(For course description, see Theological Studies III.) 
Schreiter T 13:30 Winter 

CTU/MTS 1 575 
Mission/Ministrylntegration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Kaserow T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

MTS 1-435 
Traveling Seminar: 
Christianity in the Middle East 

This seminar, designed to locate Middle Eastern 
Christianity — Orthodox, Protestant, Catholic — 
within its historical, theological, cultural and geo- 
graphical context, consists of: presentations by 
scholars and religious leaders, activists in the 
Middle East on critical issues and movements con- 
fronting the people and the Church in the region; 
travel to Syria, Jordan, Israel/Palestine, Egypt and 
Cyprus; visits to significant communities of renewal 
and of social change; visits to historic sites. Held 
during three weeks in March, 1994; see p. 16. 
Parker TBA Winter 

MTS/CTU 1-460 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry - Level 1 
(For course description, see Fall.) 
BarbourfDoidge/Schroeder M 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

MS P1392 
Cross-Cultural Ministry 

This course is intended for students whose life 
experience, theological education and/or ministry 
bridge two cultures. Students who will minister 
outside the U.S. and students who plan to minister 



77 



World Mission Studies 



History of Religions/Ministry Studies 



in a culture (or ethnic group) other than the one in 
which they were raised will examine the connec- 
tions between theology, culture, and pasotral prac- 
tice. 
FolUard W 8:25-9:45 Winter 

NPTSMNST-152 

Mission Strategy and Methodology 

Church growth strategies, methods of evangeliza- 
tion and discipleship, theological education in the 
Third World and missionary/national relationships 
are some of the topics considered. Four hours. 
Weld W 740 P.M. Winter 

NPTSMNST-154 
Christianity and Culture 

Appreciation of the impact of worldview and cul- 
ture on theology and on Christian forms and prac- 
tices permits more effective communication of 
gospel. 
Weld M 2-5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-251 

The Church and Its Mission 

This weekend module is a brief survey of the mis- 
sion of the church with emphasis on Convenant 
missions. 
Weld Jan. 21-22 Winter 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 

LSTC W-428 

Towards Understanding Islam 

The existence of two million Muslims in the USA 
and the dramatic emergence of Islam on the world 
scene have awakened increased interest in the 
nature of Islam. This course introduces the student 
to the origins of Islam, the Qur'an and its teach- 
ings, Muslim worship and practice, and characteris- 
tics of Muslim life in the modern world, as well as 
Christian faith and witness in this light. 
Vogekar TTh J -2 : 1 5 Winter 

LSTCW-531 

The Qur'an and its Interpreters 

For a proper understanding of the Qur'an, it is nec- 
cessary to employ the sciences (ulum al-Qur'an) 
which were developed for its interpretation (tafsir) 
and application. This course will introduce these 
sciences and demonstrate the ways in which the 



Qur'an has been a guide for Muslims over the last 

fourteen centuries. 

Ami TTh 10:4542 Winter 

M/LHR539 

Sectarian Movements in Islamic History 

The course will examine the origins of Islam, the 
early theological controversies around the 
Mu'tazilah and the emergence of Shi'a Islam, 
medieval reform sects such as the Muwahhidun, 
mystical orders as political forms of Islam, and 
renewal sectarian movements such as the 
Wahhabis, the Madhists of the Sudan, Ahmad iyah 
in India, Muslim Brotherhood and Jama'at-i- 
Islamia in Pakistan. Readings will include Mantle 
of the Prophet by Roy Mottahedeh and works 
addressing current issues such as "fundamentalism." 
Lavan W 740 P.M. Winter 

MSSY317 

Christology in a Pluralistic Age 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Lefebvcre MTh 8:25-9:45 Winter 

TEDS ME 835 
Religions of India 

The origins, sacred scirpture, historical develop- 
ments and major doctrines of Hinduism, Jainism, 
Sikhism and Zoroastrianism. 
Hiebert TBA Winter 

TEDS ME 840 
Eastern Mysticism 

Basis of mysticism; contemporary religious move- 
ments based on Eastern mysticism such as 
Transcendental meditation, Psychorientology, 
Divine Light, Yoga, Soka Gakkai, Hare Krishna 
and Zen; the origin of these movements in Eastern 
traditions and a Christian approach to adherents. 
Wetland TBA Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

BTS M-493 
Disciplines of Prayer 

An introduction to the knowledge and practice of 
various forms of prayer as they relate to spiritual 



78 



The Nature and Practice of Ministry 



discipline. Disciplined time will be spent both indi- 
vidually and corporately in hearing God speak 
through scripture, meditating, silence, journaling, 
guided imagery, dreams and spoken prayer. The life 
and writings of prayer saints will serve as resources. 
Faus Jan. 24-Mar. 18 TTh 1-2:45 Winter 

CTU M 409 

Ministry on the Margins 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Szura TBA Winter 



LSTC M-490 
Evangelism 

After a survey of the history of evangelism and mis- 
sion in American Lutheranism, this course will 
study the programs of evangelism used by today in a 
variety of ecumenical contexts. Lutheran traditions 
will be used to evaluate these programs so that stu- 
dents are able to construct their own theology and 
praxis of evangelism. 

BUese F9-I2 Winter 

BUese Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29; Feb. 26 9-2 Winter 



CTSCM310 

Church Administration 

An exploration of the local church as administra- 
tive unit. The course will deal with administrative 
skills, the pastor as administrator, organizational 
teachniques, use of volunteers, issues of steward- 
ship, evangelism, church growth, denominational 
relationships and resources in administration. 
Church models will be reviewed. 
Smith TK 6 .-30-9 -30 P.M . Winter 

G-ETS 34-506 
Pastor and People 

Roles and responsibilities of the pastor as reflective 
practitioner in relationship with the people of God, 
grounded in a theology of the church and ministry. 
Congregational analysis and empowerment; issues 
of pastoral identity, authority, spirituality and lead- 
ership. Practical guidance for pastoral visitation, 
time management, parish transitions, church 
administration, weddings and funerals. Limit: 25. 
Wingeier Jan. 24-Mar. 18 TTh 1 -3:20 Winter 

G-ETS 34-616 
Cross-Cultural Evangelism 

In an age of increasing mobility across cultural 
boundaries it becomes necessary to understand the 
Christian faith from a global perspective. 
Tuttle Jan. 3-21 Winter 

TWThF 940:50; TWTh I -.30-5 

LSTC M-424 

Stewardship in the Local Congregation 

This course will focus on the biblical and theologi- 
cal basis of stewardship, preaching and teaching, 
communication resources, the leadership role of 
the pastor and the importance of planning for the 
stewardship program of the local congregation. The 
project for the course will be the preparation of 
"Models for Ministry" for stewardship in the con- 
gregation. 
Palmquist M 6-9 P.M. Winter 



MTSE/M-431 

The Churches and the City: Ethical Issues in 

Urban Ministry 

(For course description see MTS E/M 400 Ethical 

Studies II.) 

Livezey T 3-5:50 Winter 

MTS M-437 

Managing Church Conflicts 

This course is an intensive which is taught in three 
blocks of time: two consecutive weekends from 1 -9 
Friday, 9-4 Saturday, one final Saturday 9-3. The 
first weekend involves a learning process for man- 
aging church conflicts. The second weekend 
involves using videotape to practice assertive plans 
of management. The third Saturday involves clari- 
fying any remaining concerns. 
Hak/erstadt Intensive Jan. 7-8; Winter 

Jan28-29; Mar. 4 

M/LM366 

Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Shadk/Engel Jan. 3-8 9-5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-172 

Sociology of Congregational Life 

An analysis will be made of the major factors that 
affect and determine patterns of belief and behav- 
ior within congregations. Students will do field 
study of local churches to test learnings. 
Carlson M 2-5 Winter 

NPTS MNST-268 
Lay-Centered Church Planting 

The focus here is pastoral leadership for training 
lay people to do the task of church planting. 
Attention is given to team ministries, home cell 
groups and discipleship as major complementary 
strategies for church parenting and church multi- 
plication. 
Reed W 7-10 P.M. Winter 



79 



The Nature and Practice of Ministry 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



NPTS MNST-360 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

This course introduces the student to basic compo- 
nents in growing a church. The perspectives and 
approaches of the church growth movement are 
studied. 
Reed MWTh 8-9:15 Winter 

NBTS MN 330 
Church Administration 

This course explores the nature of the church and 
the variety of leadership styles operative within the 
church administration. Special attention is given 
to the discernment of perferred leadership styles in 
relation to particular contexts of ministry. 
Nelson Intensive Jan. 3-7 Winter 

NBTS MN657 

Contemporary Eccelesiology: Preparing the 

Church for Its Third Millennium 

In this course an attempt will be made to define 
the doctrine of the church on the basis of an 
exegetical survey of New Testament texts that per- 
tain to the church and to formulate implications 
for church planting and church growth in secular- 
ized society. 
Bilezjkian Intensive Jan. 17-21 Winter 

SCUPE M 302 

Evangelization and Urban Congregations 

This course will concentrate on the city as the 
focus for ministry at the close of the century. 
Emphasis will be placed on acquiring an under- 
standing of the peculiar ethos of the city and the 
ways in which this affects evangelism. Some 
emphasis will be placed on certain dimensions of 
the church's approach to the urban milieu in urban 
settings. An attempt will be made to expose the 
class to field trips and/or persons from urban min- 
istries who can share their experience. 4 hours. 
Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
D'Amico Jan. 3-7 Winter 



II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

BTS T-456 
Evangelical Spirituality 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Bloesch Jan. 344 M-F8-U Winter 



CTU DS 555 

God, Grace, Church: Trinitarian Foundations of 

Christian Spiritualities 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Linnan T 2:30-5 Winter 

CTU E 551 

Spirituality/Liturgy and the Quest for Justice 

(For course description, see Ethical Studies II.) 
Pavulikowskx W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU SB480 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality: 

Old Testament 

(For course description, see Biblical Studies III.) 
Stuhlmueller T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU SH 513 

lgnatian Spirituality and the 

Discernment of Spirits 

A survey of the spiritual revolution initiated by 
Saint Ignatius of Loyola in the sixteenth century. A 
critical examination of the Spiritual Exercises and its 
influence on later and contemporary spirituality 
and piety. A study of the development of the 
notion of the discernment of spirits from the early 
Christian church down to the present. 
TBA TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTS TEC 361 
Dynamics of the Sacred 

Fundamental phenomenology and psychology of 
religion will be read for insights into the contem- 
porary meanings of uniquely religous vocation and 
leadership. Readings will include Otto, Eliade, Jung 
and others who focus on the human encounter 
with the sacred. 
Moore M9-12.40 Winter 

CTS TEC 400 

Practical Theology of Mysticism 

Course will focus on experiential/practical dimen- 
sions of mystical practice using organizing notions 
for Christian tradition/contemporary transpersonal 
psychology. Specific focus to examine transforma- 
tive aspects of mysticism using praxis method where 
we engage in spiritual practice (centering prayer) 
and reflect on this practice using our experiences 
and those of others. 
Cairns T 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 



80 



Pastoral Care 



G-ETS 13-615 

The Sacraments and Spiritual Formation 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 

Stein Jan. 24 -Mar. 18 Winter 

W 9-1 0:50; F 9- J 1:50 

G-ETS 34-606 

Prayer in Christian Ministry 

Identifying, exploring, and participating in diverse 
forms of prayer and meditation, grounded in scrip- 
ture and tradition. Attention both to personal spir- 
tual formation of the religious professional and to 
integration of prayer with the functional roles of 
pastor and Christian educator. Limit: 20. 
TroxeU Jan. 344 Winter 

TWThF 940:50; TWTh 1 -30-5 

NPTSMNST-201 

Spiritual Formation IV: Spiritual Direction 

Spiritual direction is the art and science of being a 
soul-friend in which particular attention is given to 
the discernment and following of God's providen- 
tial care in one's life. One hour credit. 
WeborgfKoonce/Carhon Jan. 11 9-2 Winter 

NPTS MNST-208 
Discipleship Practicum 11 

(For course description, see MNST-207, Fall.) 
Reed TBA Winter 

S-WTS 06-501S 
Spirituality for Ministry 

An introduction to types of spirituality and spiritu- 
al disciplines, resources for personal and profession- 
al formation, and the role of spirituality in the 
practical life of the church. 
Barker TWThF 9:30-1 1 Post-January Intensive 

TEDS PT 576 

Personal Development for Ministry 

A study encouraging self- assessment and the mea- 
suring of gifts for careers in ministry, and covering 
the personal disciplines of piety and of interper- 
sonal relationships in the light of biblical materials 
designed to focus on the leading of an exemplary 
Christian life amidst the pressures of school and 
parish life. 
Larsen T 7-9:45 P.M. Winter 

III. PASTORAL CARE 

CTU MP360 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Anderson MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 



CTU MP408 

Ministry with the Dying and the Grieving 

An examination of 1) finitude as a human prob- 
lem, 2) attachment as a human necessity, and 3) 
grief as the inevitable response to a variety of loss 
experiences throughout life, in order to enhance 
our ministering with the dying and the grieving. 
Anderson T 1042-30 Winter 

CTSCM331 

Introduction to Pastoral Care & Moral Guidance 

Critical overview of several basic texts in pastoral 
care. Involves theoretical understanding of 
approaches to caring/counseling as well as reflec- 
tion upon/integration of the student as pastor, min- 
ister and counselor. Attention given to pastoral 
care as a dimension of practical theology. Includes 
study of different types of pastoral care situation. 
Required attendance at all sessions. Limit: 25. 
MiUer-McLemore Jan. 3 942:40 Winter 

+ 2 weekends TBA 

CTS CM 542A 

Contemporary Cultures of Psychology 

A non-divisable two-quarter seminar focusing on 
readings/critical analysis of several current psycho- 
logical theories (e.g. Freud, Erikson, Rogers, Jung, 
Homey and Kohut). Course hopes to 1) familiarize 
persons with psychological theories that inform 
pastoral care/shape modern culture; 2) provide crit- 
ical tools of analysis in assessing/using these; 3) 
position these psychologies within a broader ethi- 
cal/religious framework. 
MiUer-McLemore M 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Moore W 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 32-501 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

TBA Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTh 1 3:20 Winter 

G-ETS 32-614 

Introduction to the Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to expose the student to 
quasi-scientific study of religious experience and 
behavior from psychological and normative per- 
spectives (biblical and theological). The course will 
enable the student to analyze religious experience 
and behavioral data from psychological, multi-dis- 
ciplinary, and normative perspectives. 
Rector Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTK 83040:50 Winter 




81 



Pastoral Care 



G-ETS 32-617 

Emotional and Spiritual Empowerment 

for Ministry 

This course intends to provide a foundation for 
enabling students to transform "negative" feelings 
and impulses into spiritually powerful sources of 
motivation and strength through the development 
of a theoretically informed perspective on, and 
praxis with regard to, human emotions and impuls- 
es including: anger and aggression, fear and anxiety, 
depression and low self esteem, sexuality and the 
sense of identity. Limit: 20. 

Hinkle Jan. 24-Mar. 18 Winter 

W 940:50; F 9-1 1:50 

G-ETS 32-620 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Hinkie Th 3:30-5 Winter 

LSTC M-435 
Pastoral Care and Counseling with Women 

Building on the knowledge and skills of M-320, 
Ministry in Pastoral Care or its equivalent, this 
course addresses the specific challenges of provid- 
ing pastoral care and counseling with women. 
Emphasis on understanding women in today's cul- 
ture, acquiring of specific skills, and reflection on 
appropriate boundaries. 
BiUman W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

LSTC M-436 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

This course will deal with the dynamics of chemi- 
cal dependency and drug abuse. Consideration will 
be given to etiology, symptomatology, intervention 
and after care. Alcoholism and drug abuse will be 
viewed from the perspective of family disease. Field 
trips and workshops will be included. 
ChristianJCrum F 9-1 1:30 Winter 

MTSM-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

This course leads students toward a basic under- 
standing of the meaning and practice of pastoral 
care. Focusing on various historical and contempo- 
rary models and styles of pastoral care, it helps stu- 
dents acquire skills necessary for field education, 
clinical pastoral education, advanced courses with 
experiential components, internships and pastoral 
ministry itself. 
Ashby W 6-9 P.M. Winter 



MTSM-311 
Pastoral Counseling 

This course is designed to introduce the basic con- 
cepts and models for effective pastoral counseling. 
The areas to be covered include initial assessment, 
establishing the counseling relationship, crisis 
intervention, maintaining a caring and helpful 
relationship and referral in pastoral counseling. 
Counseling techniques related to individuals, cou- 
ples and families will be considered. 
McWiUiams Th 9-1 1:50 Winter 

MTS M-348K 

Pastoral Counseling in the Korean Church 

(Taught in Korean) 

The goals of this course are: to learn the orienta- 
tion of pastoral care and counseling, to organize 
issues in the light of the Gospel, and to do case 
study in each issue. This course design intends to 
develop professional and pastoral competencies in 
performing pastoral care and counseling. 
Doh Intensive Mar. 2 1 -25 Winter Post-Term 



M/L M 330 

Pastoral Care in the Liberal Church 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Evison/Staff Jan. 3-7 9-5 



Winter 



NPTSMNST-125 

Ministry to Substance Abusers 

Lecture, discussion and guest presentations will 
develop a biblical, theological and psychological 
basis for the ministry of the church to those strug- 
gling with substance abuse. 
Jackson M 7-10 P.M. Winter 

NPTSMNST-321 

The Stewardship of Passion: 

Aggressive, Theological and Erotic 

This course is designed to explore the gifts and lia- 
bilities of the power of passion in human life; how 
these gifts can be applied towards constructive ends 
and if and when they are no longer demonstrative 
of Christ's ethic of "love one another as I have 
loved you." Masculine and feminine modes of 
expression will also be investigated to discern if 
and when these choices help or hinder the creative 
or constructive expression of passion. 
Augspurger MW 2-3:30 Winter 

NBTS MN638 

Thriving in Ministry Personally 

and Professionally 

This course is designed to assist persons in profes- 
sional ministry to take charge of their ministries in 



82 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



healthy and effective ways. Issues that will be 
addressed include spirituality, relationships, manag- 
ing difficult situations, sexual fidelity and bound- 
aries and stress management. In addition to 
assigned readings and a final paper, the course will 
include helpful inventories, lectures and group dis- 
cussion. 
Brushvjyler Intensive Jan. 10-14 Winter 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTU CW570 

Comparative Ritual: Christianity in Asia 

(For course description, see World Mission 

Studies.) 

Kaserow W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU MW474 

Lay Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum in the leadership of the community's 
non-sacramental prayer, including Hours, catechu- 
menate rites, wake and graveside services, penance 
services, services of Word and Communion and 
ministry to the sick. 
Hughes M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU W 350 
Introduction to Liturgy 

This introductory course examines basic issues and 
elements of Christian liturgy. Special attention is 
given to the liturgical documents of the Roman 
Catholic Church. Students are to participate in lab 
sessions on dates announced at the beginning of 
the quarter. 

Ostdiek UW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

Francis MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU W 450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the origins and development of 
eucharistic liturgy and theology, with a particular 
emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. Theological 
reflection on the development of eucharist will pre- 
pare for the discussion of contemporary issues in 
eucharistic theology and practice. 
Foley MW 1041:15 Winter 

CTU W 621 

The Liturgy of the Hours 

This seminar course will examine the historical 
development of theLiturgy of the Hours from early 
Christian patterns of prayer through the reforms of 



Vatican II. Special attention will be given to the 
implied spirituality of these various patterns. 
Principles for pastoral adaptation of the Hours will 
be the final goal of the course. 
Foley Th 10-12:30 Winter 

CTSCM314 

The Worshiping Congregation 

The meaning and practice of worship in the life of 
a congregation, with special attention to the pas- 
toral dimension of worship and the role of the wor- 
ship leader. The liturgical year will provide the 
basic structure, but the study will include marriage, 
funeral and occasional services. 
Edgerton M 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 31-511 
Christian Public Worship 

(For course description, see Fall.) Limit: 16. 
Duck Jan. 24-Uar. IS TTh 1-3:20 Winter 

G-ETS 31-512 
Worship and the Word 

Foundational course in worship. Preparing to lead 
worship; relation of sermon to service; selection, 
writing and arrangement of worship materials; 
resources for the minister. Biblical, historical, and 
theological criteria for worship and preaching will 
be developed. Services and sermons given by class 
members. Limit: 12. 
Murphy Jan. 24-Uar. 18 TTJi 8:30-10:50 Winter 

G-ETS 31-515 
Hymnody in Worship 

An overview and analysis of congregational song in 

the context of worship, with special attention to 

patterns of worship, the church year, celebration of 

the sacrements and the use of the Psalter. Limit: 

16. 

D. Vogel 



Jan. 24-Uar. 18 
W9-10:50:F 9-11:50 



Winter 



LSTC M-380 
Worship 

Introduction to liturgical theology and methodolo- 
gy; historical overview of Christian worship; study 
of liturgical and hymnological materials in the 
Lutheran Church; the arts as worship and as ser- 
vants of the liturgy. The course focuses on pastoral 
and presidential style in leadership, including com- 
munications skills, and on planning for worship. 
Part of the Teaching Parish experience. 
Bangert UTh 1 0:45-1 2 Winter 

+ disc. sec. Th 3 -3 -.50 
RocheUe UTh 1 0:45-1 2 Winter 

+ disc. sec. Th 3-3:50 



83 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



Preaching and Communication 



MS SY380 

Liturgy of the Hours 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Fischer MTh 9:55-1 1:15 Winter 

S-WTS 09-619S 
Reformation Liturgies 

A seminar study of the eucharistic and baptismal 
liturgies of the sixteenth century Reformation: 
Luther, Calvin, Bucer, Zwingli, the Anabaptists, 
the Council of Trent. One-half unit. 
Mitchell TTK 1 :20-2:50 Post']anuary Intensive 

S-WTS 09-644S 
Liturgical Movement 

A study of the basic principles of the Liturgical 
Movement, one of the great facts of twentieth cen- 
tury religious life. Students will be asked to read in 
Louis Bouyer, Odo Casel, the Constitution on the 
Sacred Liturgy, Gregory Dix, William P. Ladd, 
Massey Shepherd, and others, and in the contem- 
porary liturgical texts of the Episcopal Church and 
other churches. One-half unit. 
Mitchell MW 1 :20-2:50 Post-January Intensive 

TEDS PT770 
Christian Worship 

The importance, basic meaning and historical 
background of Christian worship with attention to 
principles, plans, methods and resources for wor- 
ship planning. 
Bodey TBA Winter 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTU 1 630 

Interpretive Methods: Bible Study and Preaching 

This seminar will investigate methods of biblical 
interpretation for the sake of biblical study and 
preaching in the Christian tradition. It will address 
the philosophical, theological and hermeneutical 
dimensions of authentic biblical study and preach- 
ing. 
Bergant/Fragomeni W 2:30-5 Winter 

CTU MW450 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Fragomeni M 1-3:30 Winter 



G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Chatfield Jan. 24-Mar. 18 TTh 1-3:20 Winter 

LSTC M-340 
Preaching 

The aim of the course is to help students develop a 
holistic view of preaching which does justice to 
four factors: the preacher, the listener, the message, 
and the churchly context, so as to establish sound 
practice in sermon design and delivery. Lectures, 
readings, discussions, lab sessions, teaching parish 
experience. 
Niedenthal 



Weyermann 



Th 8:30-9:45 + sec: 

M 12:45-2:30 

T 8-9:45 

T 10:30-12:15 

W 12:45-2:30 
Th 8:30-9:45 + sec: 

T 8-9:45 

T 10:30-12:15 

T 1-2:45 



Winter 



Winter 



LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language form and 
theological implications of story. Readings will 
include stories of the rabbis, short stories, and auto- 
biographical stories. Students will compose and 
share stories dealing with selected experiences and 
theological themes. For M.Div. seniors only Limit: 
12. 
Niedenthal MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS M-324 
Introducing Preaching 

This course brings together in acts of preaching the 
life of God's people in Scripture with the life of 
God's people today through each student's gifts of 
perception and expression. We prepare two sermons 
from exegesis through delivery, after working in 
small groups on campus and at field education sites. 
WardlawfMcDevitt/ 
Thomas/Rivera MW 1 0-1 1 :50 Winter 

MTSM-417 

Releasing Imagination in Your Preaching 

This course helps you exercise a more creative 
imagination in preaching. We explore imaginative 
engagement with scripture for preaching. We 
experiment with creative sermon shapes and lan- 
guage. We work with imaginative uses of your gifts 
in sermon delivery. 
Wardlaw M 2-4:50 Winter 



84 



Educational Ministry 



NPTS MNST- 138 

Public Communication Skills for Ministry 

The study and practice of basic skills in communi- 
cating the Christian faith: oral interpretation of 
Scripture, storytelling and speech preparation and 
delivery. 
Koptak M WTK 8-9 : 1 5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-216 
Twentieth-Century Preaching 

A study of contemporary preaching based on print- 
ed, recorded and videotaped sermons of leading 
homileticians. The examination of theology and 
method will include work by mainline "names" and 
electronic church preachers, ethnic minority and 
non-North American preachers, liberation theolo- 
gians and modern "cult" preachers. 
Noren Th 2-5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-310 
Senior Homiletics 

The homiletics field has received substantially 
increased attention in recent years. Advanced stu- 
dents will consider recent developments and will 
prepare and deliver sermons which reflect the 
"growing edges" of the homiletics field. Prereq: 
MNST 210, MNST 212 or equiv. 
Noren MWTh 10:154 1 30 Winter 

NBTS MN 383H 

La Practica de la Predicacion Pastoral 

(The Practice of Pastoral Preaching) 

Consideracion de los fundamentos biblicoteologi- 
cos y factores psico-sociologicos presentes en la 
predicacion pastoral en contextos hispanos. Bajo la 
supervision del profesor y un/a asistente (pastor/a 
activo/a), los estudiantes predicaran semones 
expuestos a videograbacion, evaluacion de la clase 
y posterior autoevaluacion y entrevista con el pro- 
fesor y asistente. Prereq: MN 382H, equivalente o 
permiso del profesor. 
Mouesi T 3-6:30 Winter 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU MW464 
Sacramental Catechesis 

This course addresses the complementarity 
between liturgy and catechesis. Attention will be 
given to parish celebrations of the sacraments of 
initiation and reconciliation and to preparation for 
marriage. Central to this course will be practical 



strategies for the development of programs and 
teaching methods to serve those being catechized. 
Lucinio W 13-30 Winter 

CTSCM321 

The Church's Teaching Ministry with 

Young Children 

The focus of this team-taught course is the church's 
teaching ministry from birth to age twelve. Theory 
and teaching techniques will be grounded in early 
stages of human development. Church day care 
centers; the family unit in worship and at home; 
and the place of child in resurgent Sunday Church 
School emphasized. 
B.MyersfW. Myers W 630-930 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 33-628 

Ethnicity and Cultural Pluralism in Christian 

Education 

Approaches to Christian education in culturally 
and ethnically diverse contexts. Understanding 
cultural values and practices and creating ministry 
and educational strategies for culturally specific, 
cross-cultural, and multi-cultural settings. 
Feliciano Jan. 3-21 Winter 

TWThF 940:50; TWTh 1 30-5 

G-ETS 33-635 

History and Theories of Christian Education 

An examination of the development of Christian 
religious education as an academic discipline and 
ministry in church and society in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries, with attention to helping 
students formulate their own stance in educational 
ministry. Prereq: two courses in Christian 
Education. 
Seymour Jan. 24 Mar. IS TTh 130 -5 30 Winter 

G-ETS 33-681 

Cross-Cultural Travel Seminar: New Mexico 

Identifying the cross-cultural aspects of this setting; 
fostering attitudes, skills and techniques appropi- 
rate in a pluralistic society; and designing cross-cul- 
tural ministries from the recognition that pluralism 
is an enriching factor in a culture. Travel seminar; 
see p. 15. 
TBA Jan. 3-21 Winter 

LSTC M-463 

Christian Education: Baptism 

through Confirmation 

This course will focus on building a pedagogical 
and theological foundation necessary for pastors 
and Christian educators to be most effective and 



85 



Educational Ministry 



Polity and Canon Law 



creative in their work with children at varying 
developmental stages. Emphasis will be placed on 
learning to teach children theological understand- 
ings through the use of biblical and contemporary 
stories, liturgy, music and other artistic expressions. 
Meets at the Lutheran Center, 8765 West Higgins 
Road (nearO'Hare). 
Johnson Th 6-9 P.M. Winter 

LSTC M-466 

Christian Education and Creative Imagination 

Prompted by the Gospel, Christian educators help 
others see life in new perspectives, through the use 
of creative and imaginative approaches. Students 
in the course will examine and experience the use 
of story, especially children's literature, metaphor, 
poetry, symbol, art, sculpture, mime, drama, pup- 
petry, dance and clowning. They will also create 
their own learning experiences for future use. 
Conrad TTh 2:25*3:40 Winter 

M/LM415 

Religious Education Curriculum 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Harlow/Mannheim Jan. 10-14 9-5 Winter 

NPTSMNST-134 

Moral and Faith Development in Adolescents 
An exploration of the developmental stages of 
moral reasoning and formation of faith in adoles- 
cents is pursed in this course. Examination of the 
formative work of Piaget, as well as studies of 
Kohlberg, Powers, Fowler, Marshall and others will 
be undertaken in order to understand the research 
base of adolescent development. Implications for 
ministry strategies are explored with view both to 
evangelism and discipleship. 
Downs Th 26 Winter 

NPTS MNST-230 
Developing Lay Leadership 

The course is an examination of the nature of lead- 
ership as a professional in the church and in equip- 
ping of laity for leadership responsibilities. Four 
hours. 
F. Anderson MWTh 2-3 : 1 5 Winter 

NPTS MNST-238 
Pastor as Educator 

The pastor is called to equip God's people for the 
work of the ministry, to build up the body of Christ. 
Leader development and confirmation will be the 
foci of this course. Four hours. 
F. Anderson MWTh 1 1 :40- 1 2 :55 Winter 



NBTSED310 

Personal Growth Through Group Encounter 

Participants share in a laboratory group with a 
commitment to risk new personal and interperson- 
al behaviors. Human relations skills are developed 
by leadership in small groups. Historic and current 
utilization of the small group format by the church 
for personal and spiritual growth. 
Jenkins Intensive Jan. 3-7 Winter 

NBTS ED 320 

The Pastor as Teacher 

An examination of the teaching role of pastoral 
leadership both with regard to preaching, to the life 
of the church, and other pastoral functions, as well 
as the general oversight of the educational pro- 
grams of the church. 
Clemmons M 3-6:30 Winter 



VII. POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 

CTU MW422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of the canon 
law regulating baptism, confirmation, eucharist, 
penance, anointing of the sick and marriage. 
Neville W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 40-673 

United Methodist Studies: 

The Twentieth Century 

Theological and ethical developments in 
Methodist churches as they participated in the 
growing ecumenical movement and in the matur- 
ing economic and political power of the nation. 
Evolution of the polity of The United Methodist 
Church with its uniqely connectional character in 
an increasingly pluralistic society. 
TBA Jan. 3-21 Winter 

TWThF 940:50; TWTh I -.30-5 

MTS M-307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship 
in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 
Students are prepared for thinking and acting effec- 
tively in the various church structures they enter. 
Special attention is given to the relation between 
polity, politics, leadership, and church life. 
Presbyterian students will receive specific assis- 
tance in relation to Standard Ordination 
Examinations in polity and worship. 
Recommended for Middlers. 
TBA F 9- J 1:50 Winter 



86 



Policy and Canon Law 

MTS M-307K S-WTS 13-505S 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship Canon Law 

in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) A two-fold introduction to 1 ) the history of 

(Taught in Korean) Christian canonical legislation with particular 

(For course description, see M-307 above.) emphasis on the canonical structures of the 

WorkyfKang Intensive Feb. 7-11 Winter Episcopal Church; and to 2) the use of canon law 

in pastoral ministry. One-half unit. 

M/LH395 TBA MW 3:15-4:30 Post-January Intensive 

Unitarian Universalist History and Polity 
(For course description, see Fall.) 
Godbey/Staff Jan. 17-21 9-5 Winter 



87 



SPRING 1994 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTUB541 

Fundamentalism in Biblical Interpretation 

A seminar focusing on the origins of fundamental- 
ism and its approach to biblical interpretation with 
an attempt to formulate a pastoral response to the 
fundamentalist theological stance and proselytizing 
efforts of fundamentalists. 
Hoppe W 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

MTS B-506 

Seminar: Ethics and the Bible 

An inquiry into the conversation between the 
Bible and ethical motivation and action, with 
attention to Biblical law, exhortation, story, 
proverb, Haustafeln and other genres directed to 
life under the rule of God. Biblical field faculty and 
students will contribute inquiry papers for discus- 
sion. Prereq: introductions to Hebrew Bible and 
New Testament; study of Hebrew and/or Greek. 
Campbell/Staff F 9-11:50 Spring 



OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B 300 

Old Testament Introduction 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bergani MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTCB-313 
Israel's Prophets 

Studies in the literature of the prophetic tradition, 
including detailed exegesis of selected passages. 
Knowledge of Hebrew presupposed. 
Klein MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Michel MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

NPTSBIBL-121 

Old Testament Faith 11 

The literature concerning the Monarchy and the 
Prophets provides the focus of lectures and discus- 
sions. Continued emphasis is placed on the rela- 
tionship of this literature to the Jewish and 
Christian traditions. Included in this course is an 
orientation to biblical Hebrew. Prereq: BIBL-120. 
Five hours. 

Hobngren/HaR MWTh 10:15-1 1:30 Spring 

andW 11:40-12-30 



NPTS B1BL-148 

Old Testament Faith: Prophets 

This course provides an introduction to the classi- 
cal prophets: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel and 
the twelve minor prophets. A three-pronged 
approach will be taken as the historical back- 
ground, critical issues and literary-rhetorical quali- 
ties of each prophetic book are discussed. Special 
emphasis will be given to the interpretation of 
written prophecy in the contemporary church. 
Koptak M 7-10 P.M. Spring 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B 405 
Deuteronomistic History 

A study of the story of ancient Israel's life in its 
land as told in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel 
and Kings. Emphasis on the theological perspec- 
tives of the literature, archaeological background 
and the development of interpretive skills. Prereq: 
B 300 or equiv. 
Hoppe M 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU B 420 
Psalms 

Select psalms are studied from each literary or litur- 
gical category for their language, form and theolo- 
gy. Their presence in the traditions of Israel and 
the New Testament is explored. Helpful for stu- 
dents of liturgy and spirituality or for a review of 
Israel's religion. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
SuMmueUer/Lenchak (A) MW 10-11:15 Spring 
StuHmueUer/Lenchak (B) W 7-9 :30 P .M . Spring 

G-ETS 11-603 
Prophetic Books: Amos 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic inter- 
pretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or equiv. Limit: 15. 
Bird WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCB-512 
Studies in Jeremiah 

An examination of selected texts from the book of 
Jeremiah, together with an overview of the entire 
book in English. A modest amount of attention 
will be paid to Hebrew in some texts. Special focus 
on history and theology in Judah in the seventh 
century and through the fall of Jerusalem. 
Fuerst TTh 2 : 25-3 :40 Spring 

MTS B-406 

From David to Daniel: 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from 2 



Old Testament 



Samuel to 1 Maccabees, giving in-depth attention 
to representatives of each canonical division and 
literary category. Prereq: familiarity with critical 
method as acquired in MTS B-300 or its equiv. 
CampbeU MW 104 1 -.50 Spring 

MTSB-415 
Jeremiah 

An exegetical and theological inquiry into the 
book, of the Judean agonizing prophet of Jerusalem, 
626-582 B.C. Knowledge of Hebrew will be useful, 
but is not required. 
CampbeU M 6-9 P.M. Spring 

NBTSBL421LH 

Exegesis of Selections from I and II Samuel and 1 
and II Kings/Exegesis de selecciones de I y II de 
Samuel y 1 y II de Reyes 

Students will develop their ability to use exegetical 
methods and exegetical resources and tools in order 
to know the historical, literary and social context 
of the time in which Samuel and Kings were writ- 
ten. Students will acquire a knowledge of the con- 
tent and message of Samuel and Kings and identify 
issues significant in the life and ministry of the 
contemporary church. Taught bilingually in 
Spanish and English. 
Homing TTh 1-2:20 Spring 

NBTS OT 303 
The Latter Prophets 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and the- 
ological study of the Latter Prophets. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the message of each prophet. 
Mariottini T 7-9:45 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS 01-612S 

Studies in the Pentateuch: Genesis 

In its pages we find some of the best known biblical 
stories and characters: creation and fall and flood, 
improbable parents and offspring. Precisely because 
its content is so popular, Genesis is the more chal- 
lenging. Stories of rags to riches and back again 
undergird a pattern of faith that is both contempo- 
rary and ancient. 
Deeley MW 1-2:50 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTS CH 408 
Exegesis: Third Isaiah 

An exegetical and ideological study of III Isaiah 



and the beginnings of the post-exilic community. 
The transition from prophecy to apocalypse. 
LcCocque W 942:40 Spring 

CTS CH 410 

Joel and the Warrior God 

This fifth century prophecy presents in four chap- 
ters features of great interest. It sheds light on 
Second Commonwealth Judah, on Joel's theology 
of temple and liturgy. Confluence of prophecy and 
apocalyptic, it evokes the "Day of the Lord," the 
Holy War, eschata logical catastrophes and final 
judgment . . . the book is facinating. 
LaCocqiie/Schaalman Th 9-12:40 Spring 

G-ETS 11/12-626 
Biblical Hermenutics 

Discussion of approaches to the use and interpreta- 
tion of the Bible in the Church. Topics vary from 
year to year and may focus on one of the testa- 
ments. Limit: 15. 
Bird TK 6-9 P.M. Spring 

LSTC B-640 

Graduate Biblical Seminar III: The Writings 

An ongoing seminar on materials from the third 

section of the canon: The Writings. Theme for 

1994: Job and an Introduction to Northwest 

Semitic Studies and Hebrew Poetry. (For post- 

M.Div. students. Admission of others by consent of 

instructor.) 

Michel M 12:30-3:45 Spring 

MTS B-434 

The Life Cycles of Judaism 

A historical look at the rituals and liturgies of the 
Jewish holiday cycle and the individual life cycle. 
The course will elucidate the web of law and lore, 
from biblical times to the present, surrounding the 
most important occasions of Jewish life, and will 
explore the religious beliefs and convictions 
embedded in them. 
Tamer MW 1041:50 Spring 

TEDS OT 845A 

History and Theology of Jerusalem 

This course looks at the historical city and its sig- 
nificance as Israel's capital city, and then as a theo- 
logical symbol and its significance in a theology of 
God's kingdom. 
Howard TBA Spring 




89 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



TEDS OT 84 5B 

Seminar: The Hebrew Bible, Rabbinical 

Commentary and the Septuagint 

A study of the Hebrew texts of the rabbinical com- 
mentaries on the Bible from the period of the 
Middle Ages as well as an analysis of the interpre- 
tation reflected in the Septuagint. The central 
focus of the course will be the commentary of 
Genesis by Rashi (Rabbi Shelomo ben Yitzchak) 
and the Genesis translation of the Septuagint. 
Rashi's method of interpretation will be explored as 
well as the method of the Septuagint and their 
contribution to the Christian and modern biblical 
interpretation. 
Sailhamer TBA Spring 

IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

CTU B 326 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II 

This is the second part of a two-quarter course 
which studies the grammar and vocabulary of bibli- 
cal Hebrew in order to prepare students to work 
with the Hebrew text. Prereq: B 325. 
Hoppe MTWTh 3 :30 A :30 Spring 

LSTC B-504 
Biblical Aramaic 

An introduction to biblical Aramaic and reading of 

the Aramaic sections of Daniel. 

Fuerst TBA Spring 

MTSB-321K/322K 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I, II 

(Taught in Korean) 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Han M 2-5 Spring 

NPTS B1BL-101 
Beginning Hebrew II 

The study of Hebrew grammar and the verbal sys- 
tem is completed by the middle of the term. The 
remaining time is given over to readings from vari- 
ous texts in the Hebrew Bible. Prereq: BIBL-1 00. 
Four hours. 
Holmgren MTWTh 2-3 Spring 

NPTSBIBL-104 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-102.) 

Hall TBA Spring 

S-WTS01-524GS 
Hebrew Readings: Genesis 

A sequel to "Elementary Biblical Hebrew 
Intensive" designed to develop one's ability to han- 



dle the original text through grammar and vocabu- 
lary and translation of assigned portions. In 1994 
the readings will be from Genesis. One-half unit. 
TBA T 1-2:50 Spring 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

An introduction to the writings of the New 
Testament, focusing on the origin of these writings 
in the life of the early church, the form and con- 
tent of the literature itself, and various methods of 
inquiry used to study and interpret the New 
Testament. 
TBA TBA Spring 

CTS CH 322 

The Theologies of the New Testament 

A study of the various theologies of the New 
Testament. These ethical styles will be compared 
with those found in contemporary culture. A spe- 
cial emphasis will be placed on the function of nar- 
rative ethics. 
Snyder T 942:40 Spring 

G-ETS 12-501 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew -Acts 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Roth TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

G-ETS 12-502 

New Testament Interpretation: 

Romans-Revelation 

Theory and practice of exegesis of selected episto- 
lary texts, with attention to the history of early 
Christianity. Exploration of the theology of Paul, 
Acts, and of late New Testament writings. 
Presentation of various viewpoints through team- 
taught lectures and exegetical sections meeting in 
groups. 

]ewett& Staff T 6 -8: 1 5 P.M. /lecture Spring 

8:3040 P.M./2 groups (15 each) 

LSTCB-331 
Gospel Traditions 

A study of the content of the four gospels and the 
way each author structured and edited the tradition 
so as to respond to specific needs of the church. 
Students will be introduced to the history of gospel 
study and given practice in the use of contempo- 
rary critical methods. Prereq: Greek. 
Rhoads MW 1-2:50 Spring 

TBA MW 1-2:50 Spring 



90 



New Testament 



NPTS BIBL'260 

New Testament Theology 

This course gives attention to methodological 
issues in New Testament theology and to major 
modern New Testament theologians and attempts 
to clarify both the distinctive theologies within the 
New Testament and also the deep congruence and 
unity among the New Testament documents with- 
out sacrificing either. Four hours. 
Scholer MWTh 1 1 -.40-1 2:55 Spring 



NBTS NT 302 
Paul and His Letters 

This course in an introduction to the life, letters 
and theology of Paul. It examines Paul and his first- 
century contexts (early Judaism, the Greco-Roman 
world, the early Church) and also gives attention 
to the history of Pauline interpretation and issues 
of method in the interpretation and use of Paul 
today. 
Cosgrove W 1 -3 :45 Spring 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 453 

Paul: The Corinthian Correspondence 

A study of Paul and his theology with special focus 
on 1-2 Corinthians, the primary letters in which to 
see Paul's pastoral theology and spirituality at work. 
Prereq: B 305 or equiv. 
TBA T 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTS CH 425 
Gospel of Mark 

An exegetical study of the first gospel which stress- 
es the nature of oral tradition, the origin of 
Christianity, and the traditions of Jesus before the 
canon was formed. 
Snyder M 9-12:40 Spring 

MTS B-401 

The Gospel of John 

An exegesis course which gives attention to the 
content of the Gospel as well as 1 John, the reli- 
gious environment and the community of the 
Gospel, its affinities with Hellenistic and Jewish 
traditions, its place in the developing thought of 
the early church and the significance of its symbol- 
ic language for Christian faith then and now. 
Tamer TTh 10-11 :50 Spring 

NPTSBIBH61 
First Corinthians 

This course is an exegetical study of First 
Corinthians with an emphasis on its social, histori- 
cal and theological contexts and its relationship to 
Pauline thought. Attention will be given to the rel- 
evance of Paul's response to the Corinthians' prob- 
lems for the church today. 
BeUeviUe TK2-5 Spring 



NBTS NT 404H 

EI Evangelio Juan (The Gospel of John) 

Este curso examina el texto del evangelio para elu- 
cidar el contexto literario, teologico e historico del 
cual surgio el mismo. Se intenta entender Tanto el 
texto que se nos presenta, como a los cristianos que 
nos lo dieron. 
Weiss Th 6-30-9:15 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS 02-603S 
The Fourth Gospel 

The study of the Gospel of John in the context of 

its historical environment. 

Pervo TTh I -2:50 Spring 

TEDS NT 711 
Galatians 

Comprehensive examination of the logic and the- 
ology of Galatians, with special attention to Paul 
and the Law. Prereq: reading knowledge of Greek. 
McKnight TBA Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 438 
Parables 

A study of the gospel parables as stories that chal- 
lenge the hearer to conversion. Includes various 
methods of parable interpretation and insights into 
preaching and teaching parabolically. Taught at 
River Forest Satellite. 

Reid Apr. 9 , Apr .23 , May 7, May 21 Spring 

9-12,1-4-30 

CTU B 466 

Liturgy of the Synagogue 11 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh 

Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and their theological 

implications. 

Perelmuter TTh 10-1 1 : 15 Spring 



91 



New Testament 



G-ETS 12/22-625 

The Bible and Civil Religion 

Exploration of relation between biblical theology 
and American civil religion. Emphasis on interpre- 
tation of biblical texts by key exponents of 
American nationalism. Comparison of sermons and 
tracts, with exemplary statements by political lead- 
ers and social reformers. Prereq: one foundational 
course in Bible and one in Church and Society. 
Keller WF 940:50 Spring 

LSTC B-544 

A Vision of the Church: Acts and 

Early Christian History 

The literary character, historicity, and theology of 
Acts in the light of modern research into Christian 
origins. Useful for preaching in the Easter Season 
in Series A,B, and C. 
Krentz MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC B-670 

Graduate Biblical Seminar VI: 

Early Christian Literature 

An advanced Greek reading course which gives 
opportunity for students to increase their knowl- 
edge of New Testament Greek and learn more 
about the methods and resources available for the 
analysis of texts. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Rhoads T 1-4:30 Spring 

MTS B-407 
Synoptic Gospels 

The course has two primary foci: (1) an examina- 
tion of the early traditions, forms and sources con- 
stituting the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, 
Luke) with attention to the question of the histori- 
cal Jesus, (2) distinctive literary and theological 
character of each of the Gospels in its final form, 
including the Gospel of John. Prereq: B-300 or 
equiv. 
Brawley MW 2-5:50 Spring 

MS B1389 
Jewish/Christian Dialogue 

The aim of the course is to explore the new testa- 
ment as a basis for the Jewish-Christian Dialogue. 
We will explore the implications of the pertinent 
parts of the Pauline epistle (esp. Romans 9-11) and 
the Gospels (esp. Matthew). We will then explore 
how these implications were played out in the early 
Church and Patristic Era. Finally, we will look 
toward possibilities for dialogue today. 
Lodge MTh 2:40-4 Spring 



NBTS NT 450H 

Nuevo Testamcnto: Una lectural terccrmundista 

(New Testament: A Third World Reading) 

Este curso dara a las/los estudiantes una compren- 
sion basica de la composicion, contenido y menasje 
del Nuevo Testamento desde una perspectiva ter- 
cermundista. Incluira consideraciones metodologi- 
cas y la historia de la interpretacion bfblica con ref- 
erenda especial al problema hermeneutico en 
"hacer teologia desde el re verso de la historia". 
Prereq: Dos cursos del Nuevo Testamento o per- 
miso del profesor. 
Weiss F 9-1 1:45 Spring 

NBTS NT 453 

Ethics in the New Testament 

This course examines New Testament ethics, 
including both explicitly ethical materials (e.g., 
parables, miracle stories). It situates the New 
Testament teachings in their original social frame- 
work and also asks how we may go about using the 
New Testament in constructive Christian ethics 
today. Prereq: at least one introductory New 
Testament course. 
Cosgrove T 6 :30-9 : 15 P.M. Spring 

TEDS NT 747 

Seminar: Textual Criticism 

Analysis of the materials, history and principles of 
New Testament textual criticism with application 
to selected passages. 
Harris TBA Spring 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

CTUB441 

Gospel of John from the Greek Text 

A study of the gospel of John with attention to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall structure 
and content. Prereq: B 320 and B 321 or equiv. 
Reid Th 8:30-11 Spring 



MTS/LSTC B-324/325 
Introduction to N.T. Greek II 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Mount Seel TWTh 8:45-9:50 

Mount Sec. 2 MW 2-3:50 



MTS/LSTC B^324H/325H 
Griego II (Greek II) 

(For course description, see Winter. 
Vena TTK6-8P.M. 



Spring 
Spring 



Spring 



02 



Historical Studies 



MTS B-325K 

Greek II (Taught in Korean) 

(For course description see Winter.) 
Cha T 94 1:50 



NPTSBIBL-114 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-112.) 
BelleviUe TBA Spring 

S-WTS 02-5 24GS 
Greek Readings 

This one-half unit course is a sequel to Intensive 
Elementary Greek. In the context of prepared 
translations from the Greek Bible the course will 
provide a general review of grammar and the devel- 
opment of basic Greek vocabulary. 
Pervo MW 1-2:50 Spring 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-347 

History of Christianity II 

An overview of development of the Christian 
churches in the modern period. Topics include 
Protestant scholasticism and pietism, the evangeli- 
cal revival, revolution and romanticism, the age of 
progress, the Roman Catholic reaction, Eastern 
Orthodoxy in the modern period, the ecumenical 
movement, and the churches and totalitarianism. 



Wagner 



TTh 114 1:50 



Spring 



CTU H 307 

The Middle Ages and the Reformation 

Covers the Council of Chalcedon (A.D. 451) to 
the Council of Trent (1545-1563), focusing on 
development of the medieval chruch, relations 
between East and West, history of theology, break- 
down of the medieval synthesis and the signifi- 
cance of the major reformers. 
TBA T 7-9:30 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 13-501 
History of Christianity I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Groh MW 5:407:30 P.M. Spring 

G-ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity II 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Stein MW 5:40-7:30 P.M. Spring 



G-ETS 13-503 

History of Christianity III 

(For course description, see Fall.) Limit: 35. 



Spring Murphy 



TTh 940:50 



Spring 



LSTC H-332 

Church History: Enlightenment to the Present 

A thematic survey of church history from the eigh- 
teenth century to the present, including the 
church's response to the challenges of the 
Enlightenment and the scientific and industrial 
revolutions. World Christianity and its mission in 
the modem world are the foci of the course. 
Hendel UW3A45 Spring 



MTS H-300 

Transformation of Christianity: 

A Foundational Course 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Rodriguez-Diaz MW 104 1 :50 



Spring 



MTSH-412 

The Reformation Era 

A historical and theological overview of European 
Christianity in the sixteenth and seventeenth cen- 
turies, from late medieval Catholicism through the 
divisions of the Thirty Years War. Topics include 
efforts at reform within the late medieval church; 
the Lutheran, Zwinglian, and Calvinist reforma- 
tions; the radical reformation and the Anabaptists 
and sectarians; the Council of Trent and counter- 
reform; and the development of Anglicanism. 
Sawyer W 6 -9 P.M. Spring 

NBTS CH 302 

Reformation and Reactions: Christianity in 
Europe and America from the Sixteenth to 
Twentieth Centuries 

The purpose of this course is to use specific ideas, 
events and people in the history of the Christian 
Church as the vehicles for developing critical 
thinking and writing skills which are essential to 
scholarship and to ministry. 
Rodgerson Pleasants T 1-3:45 Spring 

II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

CTU H 401 
Patristics 

A study of the theological perspectives of major 

writers of the early church. Prereq: H 300, H 302 or 

CH325. 

TBA MW 1-2:15 Spring 




93 



Historical Studies 



CTS CH 367 

History and Polity 

of the United Church of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, including 
its antecedents: the Congregational Christian 
Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. This course satisfies current UCC require- 
ments for ordination. 
Smith et d. TK 6:30-9-30 p.m . Spring 



LSTC H-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Hendel MTh J 0:45- J 2 

Pero M 33:50; W 34:40 



Spring 
Spring 



MTSH-416H 

Historia de la lglesia en Latinoamerica y el 
Caribe (Church of History of Latin America and 
the Caribbean) 

Este curso habra de explorar el desarrollo del cris- 
tianismo en America Latina cubriendo especial- 
mente los periodos de la colonizacion y de la ind- 
pendencia de los paises latino-americanos. Se hara 
enfasis en dos de los proyectos fundamentales de la 
evangelizacion: la catoloica romana y el protes- 
tantismo. 



Rodriguez-Diaz 



T 1-3:50 



Spring 



M/LH494 

Unitarian Universalism 

in the Twentieth Century 

An advanced course in Unitarian Universalist his- 
tory, structured to provide a comparative historical 
context for more detailed study of the religious 
ideas and institutional development of the 
Unitarian and Universalist movements during the 
twentieth century. The course will commence with 
an examination of major features of twentieth-cen- 
tury religious liberalism in other denominations, 
prior to our specific study of that view within 
Unitarianism and Universalism. We shall examine 
the histories of the two movements, their recent 
merger, and major features of that history after 
merger. Prereq: Unitarian Universalist History. 
Godbey TTh 9-10: 20 Spring 

MS H1369 

The Catholic Church In Latin America 1 

The aim of this course will be to survey some of the 
major moments in the life of the Catholic Church 
in Latin America from the European conquest 



through the rise and development of the contem- 
porary states (1519-1969). Of special concern will 
be in the impact of the Conquest, the patterns of 
ecclesiastical response to the conquered peoples, 
the movements for national independence and the 
church's evolving role in the new nation states. 
Hennessey MTK 8:25-9:45 Spring 

NBTS CH 360 

History of African American 

Religious Experience 

This course traces the development of the African 
American religious experience from the African 
Diaspora to the present. It also includes discussions 
of African influences, major leaders and contempo- 
rary trends. 
Butler TTK 9:30-10:50 Spring 

NBTS CHTH 401 
Baptist Identity 

The purpose of this course is to achieve clarity on 
what constitutes Baptist identity. Through the 
engagement with six historic Baptist confessions of 
faith and supplementary reading, we will seek to 
trace the development and articulation of the 
social, political and theological convictions of 
Baptist who have sought to live out their distinc- 
tive vision in the face of dominant cultural influ- 



ences. 

Rodgerson Pleasants/Sharp 



W 1-4:30 



Spring 



NBTS CH 560 

The Historiography and Interpretation of 

Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism 

This seminar will examine recent efforts to inter- 
pret the history and present reality of "fundamen- 
talist" and "Evangelical" traditions. Special atten- 
tion will be given to historical, theological, and 
social scientifc frameworks utilized by interpreters 
of the phenomenon. Prereq: (1) CH 302 or CH 
303, (2) a course in American Christianity, or (3) 
permission of the instructor. 
Dayton M 6:30-9:15 P.M. Spring 

III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

G-ETS 13-602 
Augustine 

Life and theology of Augustine according to his 

writings and his times. Limit: 15. 

Groh Th 6-9 P.M. Spring 



94 



Historical Studies 



NPTS HSTX-132 

John Calvin and the Puritans in England and 

America 

This seminar examines through reading, research 
and discussion the life and work of John Calvin 
and the development of the Reformed tradition, 
particularly among the Puritans in the seventeenth 
century. Puritan theology, churchmanship and spir- 
itual autobiography, in light of Calvin, provide the 
focus. 
P. Anderson W 2-5 Spring 

S-WTS 03-616S 
Richard Hooker 

A study of the pre-eminent theologian of the six- 
teenth-century Church of England with attention 
both to the situation of the church in Elizabethan 
England and to the contemporary significance of 
Hooker for the ecumenical Christian community. 
Haugaard MW 1-2:50 Spring 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTS CH 381 

North American Church History 

A study of the history of religious life and practice 
in the United States and Canada. Topics include 
the study of select individuals, relationships 
between church and state, the rise of denomina- 
tionalism, and the influence of movements such as 
evangelicalism, fundamentalism and feminism. 
Stebner T 2-5 Spring 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in the United 
States and especially on the problem of unity and 
polarization among the various Lutheran traditions. 
The historical development is viewed against the 
broad background of Christianity in America. 
Prereq: Unity and Diversity and H-330 or H-331. 
Baglyos MTK J 0:45- J 2 Spring 

NPTS H1ST-256 

The Bible in American Life 

This seminar examines the function, use and status 
of the Bible in American culture. While some 
attention is paid to academic study of the Bible, 
the primary focus is the way the Bible has been 
used in various movements by particular groups and 
important individuals in the Christian community. 
Graham W 2-5 Spring 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU CH420 

Modern Mission History 

This course will study the exciting and challenging 
period of modern mission history in the Roman 
Catholic Church. The end of the French 
Revolution marked the beginning of this revival of 
Christian missionary efforts and it has continued 
through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to 
the present day. 
Schroeder MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTS CH 490 

Religious and Social History of Chicago 

A seminar designed to engage students in the study 
of Chicago history as a microcosm of U.S. society, 
focusing on late twentieth centures. Topics include 
urbanization, revivalism, pluralism and political, 
theological and social reform movements. 
Stebner W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTS CH 495 

Ministry Of, By and For the Laity 

This course will explore historical and contempo- 
rary ideals and realities of lay discipleship. 
Theologies of lay ministry and vocation; dynamics 
of commitment and marginality; movements of lay 
revitalization. Goals are to assist clergy in seeing 
from lay perspectives and laity in understanding 
the grounds and complexities of their empower- 
ment. 
Boss Th 3-6 Spring 

G-ETS 13^644 

Oral History Seminar 

Introduction to theory and methods of oral histori- 
cal research; guidance in carrying through a specif- 
ic oral history project. 
Murphy T 6-9 P.M. Spring 

MTS/LSTC H-428 

History, Theology, Hermeneutics 

(Hispanic emphasis, taught in English) 

The professor will explore with students his own 
hermeneutical approaches and how they relate 
both to history and to his own experience. 
Students will be encouraged to apply a similar 
method of reflection to their own hermeneutics. 
J. Gonzalez TBA (3 weekends) Spring 




95 



Theological Studies 

THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

G-ETS 21-500 

Contexts and Methodologies for 

Contemporary Theology 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

D. Vogel WF 940:50 Spring 

G-ETS 21-502 
Systematic Theology 11 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

WiU TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTCT-313 
Christian Theology 111 

For description of the Christian Theology 
sequence, see Christian Theology I (Fall). The 
third course in the sequence deals with the Holy 
Spirit, the Church, the means of grace, the 
Christian life and eschatology. 
Rodriguez M 10:45-12 Spring 

WestheUe TTK 1-2:15 Spring 

NBTS TH 302 

Problems in Faith and Theology 

This course builds on TH 301 by focusing on the 
problems encountered in theological reflection and 
construction. The major doctrines are examined 
with regard to the problems that emerge in the 
movement from faith affirmation to theological 
articulation. 



Sharp 



M 1-3:45 



Spring 



S-WTS05-615S 
Development of Doctrine 

An overview of the development of selected issues 
in Christian thought from the first through the 
nineteenth centuries. Faith and reason; Christ and 
salvation. Limit: 20. 
Barker WF 9-10:50 Spring 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS 1-358 

Contemporary Pacifist Issues 
Historic attitudes toward questions of peace; con- 
temporary issues related to violence and nonvio- 
lence; definitions, theologians, biblical doctrines 



and strategies will all be discussed in the context of 
seeking biblical and theological bases for peace- 
making. 
Brown TTK 9 : 30- 1 0:50 Spring 

BTS T-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. 
Principal readings will be in the Church Dogmatics. 
Groff TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

CTU C 458 

Hispanic Faith and Culture 

Religion and culture, faith and life are inseparable 
for Hispanics. How are these values expressed with- 
in the Hispanic community? What are the pastoral 
implications for the minister? This course will offer 
an opportunity to discover how the values inherent 
in Hispanic faith and culture affect ministry. 
Pineda TTh 1 1 -30-12:45 Spring 

CTS TEC 503 
Theology of John Wesley 

A reading seminar in the thought of John Wesley, 
emphasizing themes of personal transformation, 
social holiness and growth in grace. 
Jennings W 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-644 

The Liturgy of the Synagogue 

Inquiry into history, structure, and content of 

Jewish worship from biblical times to the modern 

era. Examination of various types of liturgy of both 

the traditional and modern synagogue. One-half 

unit. 

Schaalmann W 5:40-7:30 P.M. Spring 

NPTS THEO-174/BTS T-467/LSTC T-436 
Studies in Bonhoeffer 

In-depth focus on key Bonhoeffer texts. The con- 
venors bring to the analysis their own distinctive 
perspectives from Pietist, Anabaptist and Lutheran 
traditions. Taught at NPTS. 
Nelson/BrownlRochelle M 6:30-9:10 P.M. Spring 

NBTS TH 5 11C 

Doctrine of Reconciliation in the 

Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar will consist of reading one volume of 
the fourth part of Church Dogmatics (the doctrine 
of "reconciliation"). In a three year cycle three sep- 
arate volumes will be read so the course may be 
repeated. Volume for 1994: Part IV/3. Prereq: Basic 
theology sequence or permission of the instructor. 
Dayton T 6:30-9:15 P.M. Spring 



96 



Theological Studies 



S-WTS 05-625S 

Study of a Theologian: Wolfhart Pannenberg 

An examination of the theology of Pannenberg 
which will focus upon this understanding of 
hermeneutics, historical consciousness, anthropolo- 
gy, and Christology. The course will be conducted 
as an ongoing colloquium. Reading will include 
Revelation as History, selections from Basic 
Questions Theology (3 vols.), and Jesus: God and 
Man. 
Stevenson WF 940:50 Spring 

III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 



explore the theological foundations of mission and 
the dynamics of culture in evangelization and will 
attempt to articulate their mutual interrelatedness. 
It will use the history of evangelization in the 
Hispanic Americas as a test case. 
Riebe-Estrella W 7-9 :30 P .M . Spring 

CTS TEC 418 
Theologies of Asia 

A reading seminar surveying some of the most 
important trends in Asian theology including the 
work of Kitamori, Song, Minjung theology and 
connections to liberation theology. 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Spring 



BTS T-421 
Theology and Culture 

A study of various aspects of the "church and cul- 
ture question," using a variety of cultural media 
(films, novels, music, news reporting) to examine 
the resident faith expressions and how the particu- 
lar media shapes/influences the possible faith 



expression. 
Front?: 



F9-J2 



Spring 



BTS T-439 

Theology of the Urban Church 

The study of the mission of urban congregations 
and the possibility of church renewal in areas of 
massive change and dramatic division into racial 
and ethnic communities. 
Wagner F9-I2 Spring 

CTU D 435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning ori- 
gins, evil and finality. This course focuses princi- 
pally on the Christian tradition with only occa- 
sional references to similar themes in world reli- 



gions. 
Hayes 



TTh 10-11:15 



Spring 



CTU D 436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A study of the notion of myth, mythic conscious- 
ness and the way myths are used in the Bible and in 
various cultures to express the origin of the world 
and humankind, the origin of evil, and the individ- 
ual and collective end. 
Schreiter M 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU D 446 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

If mission is not imposition, how can it still be 
more than cultural accomodation? This course will 



CTS TEC 496 
Good and Evil 

Exploration of contemporary struggles with the 
issue of violence in revolutionary situations, in the 
American peace movement, in the women's move- 
ment and in the Third World situation. Special ref- 
erence to the use of political violence in the strug- 
gle for liberation. 
Thistlethwcdte W 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-603 

Seminar in Contemporary Christology 

Discussion of contemporary thought about 

Christological issues. Limit: 1 2. 

WiU TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC T-604 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Issues and Options 

Third in a series of three required seminars for 
graduate students in theology. Will focus on the 
essential issues that Christian theology must deal 
with today and assess the ways in which various 
schools of thought are dealing with these issues. 
WestheUe M 8:10-12 Spring 

LSTC T-672 

Advanced Religion and Science Seminar 

This seminar includes both faculty and students and 
deals each year with a specific field within the field 
of religion and science. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Gilbert M 7-9 :50 P .M . Spring 

MTS/LSTC H-428 

History, Theology, Hermeneutics 

(Hispanic emphasis, taught in English) 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 
J. Gonzalez TBA (3 weekends) Spring 



97 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



MTST-510 

Believing in God 

What does it mean to believe in God? This seminar 
explores experiences of God in the Christian com- 
munity and teachings about God which arise in 
connection with them. Attention is given to the 
way those teachings reflect experiences of faith and 
are challenged by other religions and philosophical 
positions. Prereq: T 300 or equiv. 
Parker TBA Spring 

M/L TS 322 

Literature for Liberal Religion 

An examination of the methodological and theo- 
logical issues raised by efforts to identify a "classical 
literature" for liberal religion in the context of the 
reading of selected biblical and non-biblical texts. 
Godbey/Staff F9-12 Spring 

MS SY301 

Christologies and the "Mysteries" 

The "Mysteries" of Jesus' earthly life — his baptism, 
temptation, transfiguration, agony, passion, death 
and resurrection — have a large place in devotion- 
al treaties, but are often given minimal attention in 
systematic Christology. Today, interest in retriev- 
ing the historical Jesus has given rise to a new 
appreciation of the value of these "mysteries" as 
sources for Christology. Students will investigate 
both classic and contemporary efforts to probe the 
meaning of these mysteries. 
Butler MTh 1:15-2:30 Spring 

NBTS TH 421 

The Minister as Theologian 

Students will be enabled to identify ways in which 
the minister engages in theologizing in the context 
of ministry, as well as the ways in which ministry 
supports and gives expression to theology. Students 
will examine and engage the movement back and 
forth between theological reflection and ministry 
praxis from a variety of perspectives with a view 
toward assessing the integration of theology and 
ministry. Prereq: TH 301, TH 302. 
Sharp M 6:30-9:15 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS05-613S 

Contemporary Discussions in Christology 

A study of the fundamental concerns and conclu- 
sions of a variety of contemporary christological 
discussions, including the themes of incarnation 
and atonement, battle, eschatology, resurrection 
and judgment. 
Stevenson MW 3-4:50 Spring 



S-WTS05-670S 
Theology in America 

An exploration of the theological foundations of 
principal movements in American religious history 
through investigation of historical texts. 
Barker TK 9-1 1 :50 Spring 

SCUPE M 304 
Christology and Culture 

This course is designed to introduce Christology 
from a global, cultural and liberational perspective 
and its significance for urban missiology. Students 
will examine contemporary Christological issues 
emerging from different historical, theological, geo- 
graphical and cultural perspectives. Fees may apply; 
see p. 19. 
Pinto/Bakke Ta.M. Spring 

TEDS ST 845 

Christianity and the Current Culture 'War 

This course will focus on the relationship of 
faith/revelation and reason in the approach of con- 
temporary evangelical theologians and philoso- 
phers. 
Henry TBA Spring 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E 375 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

WadeU MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) Limit: 30. 
Eugene TTK 9-10:50 Spring 

MTS E-300 

Introduction to Contemporary 

Christian Ethics 

This course is an introduction to the content and 
methods of Christian ethical thought, organized 
around three questions: What is Christian ethics? 
What are the primary ways of doing Christian 
ethics and the primary sources of Christian ethics? 
How are the differing methods and sources used in 
the analysis of current ethical problems? 
HadseU T 3-5:50 Spring 



98 



Religion and Society Studies 



NPTS THEO-220 

Christian Ethics and the Church 

Several contemporary moral issues are considered 
from the perspective of biblical and theological 
guidelines. The role of the congregation and other 
church structures is a major focus. Four hours. 
Nehon MWTh J 0: ISA 1 30 Spring 



II. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E 482 
Medical Ethics 

A study of the relation of general ethical principles 
and methods to the concerns of the medical profes- 
sion. Among topics treated will be experimentation 
with human subjects, organ transplantation, genet- 
ic engineering, m vitro fertilization, access to health 
care and the interrelationships between the rights 
of patients, doctors and society. 
Nairn MW 1 1 -3042:45 Spring 

CTU E 534 
Love and Justice 

Various ethical systems have developed around the 
central theme of love or justice or their interaction. 
Differences in the understanding of these notions 
constitute different approaches to morality. This 
seminar will analyze, compare and critically assess 
the ways in which these notions function in 
Christian ethics and theology. 
Nairn T 8:30-1 1 Spring 

G-ETS 22-604 
Feminist Ethics 

Study of crises in women's lives, especially in rela- 
tion to violence. Exploration of cultural back- 
ground, social analysis, practical experience and 
decision making in such situations as marriage and 
divorce, discrmination in the workplace, medical 
ethics, abortion, rape and domestic violence. 
KeUer/Ruether TTh 1 -303:20 Spring 



MTS B-506 

Seminar: Ethics and the Bible 

(For course description, see Biblical Studies 

General.) 

CampbeWStaff F 9-1 1:50 Spring 

M/L E 399 

Religion and Democracy in the Liberal Tradition 

An examination of efforts by twentieth-century 
liberal religious thinkers to articulate the theologi- 
cal and ethical bases of democratic faith and prac- 
tice. 
Engel Th 9:30-1 2 Spring 

M/L E 538 

Ecology, Justice and Faith: 

Advancing the Theological Agenda 

A seminar on issues and problems confronting cur- 
rent efforts to provide theological grounding for an 
ethic that combines social justice and ecological 
integrity. 
Engel 



F 1304 



Spring 



S-WTS 08-61 OS 

Anglican Identity and the Christian Life 

Beginning with the question of what is distinctive 
about Anglican identity, the course will explore 
this question by a close reading and assessment of 
selected Anglican thinkers such as Hooker, Taylor, 
Butler, Wesley, Maurice, Kirk and Temple. 
Sedgwick MW 3-4:50 Spring 

S-WTS 08-61 2S 

Ethics and Human Sexuality 

This seminar will consider changing understanding 
of the nature of human sexuality through histori- 
cal, contemporary, theological and ethical studies. 
Sedgwick MW 3-4:50 Spring 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 



LSTCE-441 
Israel-Palestine Conflict 

A case study of the interaction between religion 
and politics as an example for Christians concerned 
with social action and advocacy. Attempts to 
improve understanding of the origins and present 
status of Israeli and Palestinian claims to the land 
and to explore options for resolving the ongoing 
disputes. 
ManhaU/Vogekar W 2306 Spring 



BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
TBA Wl-2 



Spring 



CTU E 444 

Ethical Issues in Economics and Business 

The relationship between Christianity and the ori- 
gins of modern capitalism; a Christian critique of 
capitalism; the Corporate Responsibility move- 



99 



Religion and Society Studies 



World Mission Studies 



ment; international economic issues; ethics in busi- 



ness. 
PcuLulikowski 



TT/i 1041:15 



Spring 



CTS 1 462 

Health Ministries Seminar 

In this multi-disciplinary seminar, the emphasis is 
on integration of health and faith through a know- 
ledge of and influence on systems to accomplish 
planned change. Using coalition building, negotia- 
tion processes, community development, advocacy 
and community validation, the students will partic- 
ipate in shaping health care direction at local, 
regional, national and international levels. Limited 
enrollment. 
Cukr/Dahm/MainorfMcDeinnou TBA Spring 

G-ETS 22-623 

Rural Communities and the Small Church 

Analysis of the various kinds of rural communities 
in the midst of social change; ethical issues related 
to agriculture and the appropriate patterns and 
strategies for the Christian community to carry out 
its mission in such settings; field visits and case 
studies. Limit: 20. 
ThoUnjKeefer Th 6-9 P.M. Spring 

G-ETS 22-639 
Pastoral Ministry with 
African-American Families 

Assessment of pastoral concerns and needs of 
African-American families in relation to the his- 
toric model of the black church as an extended 
family, including ecclesiological dimensions of 
African-American family life, emerging lifestyles 
and challenges confronting such families, ethical 
understandings of black love and sexuality, and 
pastoral care for the African-American family. 
Eugene T 6-9 P.M. Spring 

NBTSCT310 

Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural Approach 

This course considers theological presuppositions 
about the relation of Church and society, and ana- 
lyzes the United States' socio-cconomic-political- 
cultural situation as a reality in conflict. Students 
engage in research, class presentations and dia- 
logue, and smaller group discussions in order to 
develop paradigms for the Church's life and mis- 
sion. Recommended: A basic theology course as 
well as some background in sociology. 
Moiiesi/Builer T 2:30-5: /5 Sfmng 



SCUPE S-H 303 

Dynamics and Development of the 

Modern Industrial City 

This one-week course focuses on the following 
issues related to the city: structures of authority; 
financial systems; rules and policies; tools and tech- 
niques in development; theological and ethical 
questions, including those with regard to methods 
of research in urban studies. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
HaRett Mar. 28-Apr. I Spring 

TEDS PT725 

Understanding the Uban World 

The history of the city will be examined and atten- 
tion will concentrate on modern patterns of urban- 
ization and recent trends. Urban systems will be 
analyzed in their metropolitan context, and special 
attention will be given to the dynamics, problems 
and opportunities of the central city. The student 
will be challenged to begin thinking through the 
unique ministry and mission challenges which are 
posed for the whole church by the urban context. 
Speer TBA Spring 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 

CTU C 400 

The Experience of Rel igion 

Members of this class will be encouraged to appre- 
ciate the unfamiliar and the cross-cultural elements 
in religions. The thesis of the course is that authen- 
tic ministry depends on empathy with and under- 
standing of other people's reality. Not easily 
achievable, such understanding is possible to 
undertake. 
Kaserow T 7-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU C 409 

Mission on the Margins: Homelessness in the City 

(For course description, sec Fall.) 

Gittins TBA Spring 

CTU C 519 

Toward a Spirituality for Missionaries 

A search for an appropriate, practicable and holis- 
tic spirituality through participants' reflection on 
mission realities such as marginalization, poverty, 
embodiment, violence and burnout. 
Gittins MW 1 1:30-/2:45 Sprmg 



100 



History of Religions 



CTU D 446 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Riebe-EscreUa W 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU/MTS C 593 
Lakota/Christian Dialogue 
(Field Trip to South Dakota) 

Especially designed for those preparing for Native 
American ministries and/or interested in 
Lakota/Christian dialogue. This course consists of a 
week- long field intensive on the Rosebud and Pine 
Ridge Reservations, SD, led by traditional and 
Christian Lakota Sioux and Christian missionaries. 
Travel costs/dates TBA; limit: 15. 
Barbour TBA Spring 

CTU/MTS I 575 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Staff T 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

LSTC W-423 

World Mission of the Church 

The course deals with the church as a global com- 
munity in its missionary and ecumenical outreach. 
Special attention is given to the life and growth of 
Third World churches, and to problems of contex- 
tualization, interreligious witness and dialogue, 
advocacy of justice, and mission in unity. 
Developing a theological basis for mission is 
emphasized as a renewed challenge to the church. 
Scherer TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

MTS/CTU C 470 
Mission-in-Reverse: Theory and Praxis 

This approach to mission, its raison d' itre and 
methodology will be studied through research, 
readings and visits to local communities. 
Participants will develop their own theory and 
praxis of mission and ministry and the relationship 
to the questions of global solidarity, justice, person- 
al and social transformation. Limit: 10. Class meets 
atMTS. 
Doidge Wi-3:50 Spring 

MS MS330 

Inculturation, Evangelization and 

Hispanic Popular Religiosity 

An exploration into the important role the popular 

religiosity of Hispanics plays in the evangel icat ion 

of these peoples. We will also try to make some 

practical pastoral applications that can lead to a 

successful inculturation of our faith in the Hispanic 

reality. 

Mendez MTK 2:40-4 Spring 



NPTSMNST-151 

Cultural Dimensions in Missions 

Insights from social sciences are applied to the mis- 
sionary task of the church. Advocacy and contexu- 
alization of the gospel in various cultures are stud- 
ied. Four hours. 
Weld W 740 P.M. Spring 

NPTSMNST-153 

The Christian Confrontation with World 

Religions 

This class will seek understanding of similarities 
and distinctives of the world religions. The empha- 
sis is on dialogue between the Christian and the 
non-Christian as persons. 
Weld M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

TEDS ME 675 
Intercultural Ministry 

An examination of literature from the disciplines 
of intercultural communications, intercultural edu- 
cation and anthropology, with particular attention 
to the process of developing intercultural ministry. 
Participants will be involved in some field work 
and research. 
McKinney TBA Spring 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 

LSTC W-425 

Buddhist 'Christian Dialogue 

Christians cannot avoid the joy and the challenge 
of religionships with people of different faith com- 
mitments. This course will discuss issues relevant 
for dialogue between Christians and Buddhists of 
the Theravada tradition. 
Than MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTCW-532 
Qur'sinic Arabic 

An introduction to classical Arabic, the language 

of the Qur'an. 

Basool TBA Spring 

M/LHR439 

Islam: Faith, Tradition and Dialogue 

Understanding Islam as a world faith and tradition 
is of cricial importance for ministers and laity. The 
course will examine Islam from the perspective of 
al-Qur'an, the prophet, law and history. Central 
issues of contemporary Islam, liberal and funda- 
mentalist, such as the impact of the Iranian revolu- 
tion and the debate over literature insulting to the 




101 



Ministry Studies 

faithful will be discussed. Muslim guests will partic- 
ipate in a dialogue. Students will be asked to pre- 
sent worship services or programs on Islam. 
Lavan W 740 P.M. Spring 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CTU M 409 

Ministry on the Margins 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Szura TBA Spring 

CTS CH 495 

Ministry Of, By and For the Laity 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 
Bass Th 3-6 Spring 

G-ETS 34-503 

Equipping the Church for Mission and Evangelism 

Roles and responsibilities of pastor, Christian edu- 
cator, and laity in understanding, leading and 
empowering the congregation for mission and 
evangelism. Grounded in a theology of church and 
ministry. Deals with congregational analysis, styles 
of leadership and evangelism, administrative prac- 
tices, and parish management. Levels II and III 
only. Limit: 25. 
WingeierfTutLk MW 5 :40-7:30 P .M . Spring 

LSTC M-421 

Jewish Perspectives on Ministry 

A basic overview of contemporary Jewish thought 
and practice as an orientation to ministry in a plu- 
ralistic community, and with a special focus on 
Jewish resources for Christian ministry; liturgical 
traditions, scholarly materials, homiletical 
resources. Other issues will also be explored, and 
visits to local Jewish institutions will be included. 
Berman TTh 3:50-5:05 Spring 

LSTC M-422 

Challenges in Rural Ministry 

An examination of common misperceptions and 
stereotypes associated with small towns and farm- 
ing communities and an identification of the dis- 
tinctive values, mores, and cultural traditions 
unique to rural communities. Efforts will be made 
to contextualize pastoral ministry in rural congrega- 
tions. 
Niedenthai T 2:30-5 Spring 



The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

MTS M-346K 

Church Administration (Taught in Korean) 

The course will review the administrative chal- 
lenges characteristic of Korean-American church- 
es, identify requisite managerial skills, and explore 
ways of developing managerial competency of the 
pastor to engage in the practice of ministry. 
Chun M 9-1 1:50 Spring 

NPTSMNST-161 
Contemporary Evangelism: 
Methods and Resources 

A course designed for the student who is already 
pastoring or is soon to be the pastor of a local 
church. The tools for evangelism will be presented 
by guest practitioners who have effectively used 
them. The class will then probe behind the tools 
for the theory and theology. 
Penson W 7-10 P.M. Spring 

NPTS MNST-374 

Stewardship and Financial Management 

A study of the theology and practice of stewardship 
and financial management, both in the church and 
for the pastor. 
Carlson MWTh 10:15 -1 1 :30 Spring 

NBTSIN310H 

El Arte de la Interpretacion en la Formacion 

Pastoral (The Art of Interpretation in Ministry 

Formation) 

Curso disenado para hispanos/as que comienzan a 
desarrollar su agenda teologica. Se utilizaran auto- 
biografiias personales como punto de partida. Las 
claves hermeneuticas incluyen personajes biblicos, 
de la historia de la iglesia y de la literatura 
Castellana. Atencion especial se dara a la impor- 
tancia de pensar teologica, hermeneutica y ministe- 
rialmente. 
Nelson M 6 :30-9 : 1 5 P .M . Spring 

NBTS MN 540 

Senior Seminar on Pastoral Ministry 

This class will aid the student in working with a 
pastoral search committee to secure a ministry posi- 
tion and in conducting such ministry tasks as wed- 
dings, funerals, baptisms, the Lord's Supper, bud- 
geting, evangelism, conflict management and 
building the church program. Attention will also 
be given to the pastor as a person. Enrollment is 
limited to those in their last year of seminary who 
are preparing for pastoral ministry. 
Chapman W 2:30-5:15 Spring 



102 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

S-WTS 12-615S 
Congregational Development 

This course will explore problems and opportuni- 
ties for congregational development as they arise in 
movements of growth or decline. Besides issues of 
membership size, the course will give consideration 
to educational, formational, and training processes 
needed to ensure appropriate lay involvement in 
Christian mission. 
Winters TTh 9- J 0:50 Spring 



II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTUC519 

Toward a Spirituality for Missionaries 

(For course description, see World Mission 

Studies.) 

Ghtins MW 11:3042:45 Spring 

CTU SB629 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

A close examination of the mystical substratum of 
Jewish historical and religious experience through 
an indepth study of the messianic movements in 
Judaism from the talmudic period up to and includ- 
ing the Sabbatai Sevi, tracing the stream of mysti- 
cal thought and experience through the examina- 
tion of pertinent historic texts and source material. 
Perehrmter MW 1 1 -.3042:45 Spring 



Pastoral Care 

NPTS MNST-209 
Discipleship Practicum III 

(For course description, see MNST-207, Fall.) 
Reed TBA Spring 

NCT1 Seminar 

(= G-ETS 40-CTI, MS H454, NPTS MNST- 

206, S-WTS CT194, TEDS PT 875) 

Prayer and Life in the Spirit 

This course is designed to provide both students 
and professors with an opportunity to explore, 
through study and applied experience, the roots 
and the historical development of theological pre- 
suppositions underlying spiritual traditions in 
Christianity. Meets at various locations. 
Enrollment limited. 

Webarg et al. W 740 P.M. Spring 

+ 2 weekends 



III. PASTORAL CARE 

CTU MPS 25 

Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context 

This seminar will explore the theoretical and prac- 
tical difficulties and possibilities of empathy as a 
way of communicating understanding across cul- 
tures. Role play and case studies will be used to 
enhance the participant's capacity to be empathic 
across cultures. Limit: 16. 
Anderson M J -3:30 Spring 



LSTC M-486 

Spiritual Direction in Evangelical Perspective 

A course for students who would like to minister as 
spiritual directors, but who need theological words 
and historical models to name what they are doing, 
ethical and technical guidelines about how to do it, 
and time to practice doing it. Each student will 
develop a personal style of spiritual direction, 
which takes into account the theology and liturgy 
of the church and the needs of the individual-in- 



community. 
RocheUe 



TTh 2:25-3:40 



Spring 



NPTS MNST-102 

Spiritual Formation II: Life of Prayer 

Presentations and discussion will provide introduc- 
tion to the scope and variety of the prayers and 
practices of the Christian tradition with small 
groups providing further occasion for discussion of 
and experiment with the presentations and time for 
prayers of particular concern to each group. One 
hour credit. 
Carlson/Staff T 8-9:50 Spring 



CTU MP531 

Modern Maladies of the Soul 

This seminar will examine themes in modern expe- 
rience that might be identified as maladies of the 
soul and propose alternatives from the Christian 
tradition for those maladies: from anxiety to 
courage, from loneliness to friendship, from cyni- 
cism to faithfulness and from despair to hope. 
Limit: 12. 
Anderson T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTS CM 534 

Advanced Pastoral Counseling and Care 

An advanced seminar on selected topics in the 
general field of pastoral care and counseling and in 
pastoral and practical theology and on selected 
human problems. Special attention to current liter- 
ature and issues. Seniors and D.Min. students only. 
Required attendance at all sessions. Limit: 20. 
MiUer-McLemore March 28 942:40 Spring 
+ 2 weekends TBA 




103 



Pastoral Care 



CTS CM 539 

Seminar: Jungian Perspectives on Family 

Dynamics and Family Therapy 

An investigation of the contributions of contempo- 
rary Jungian psychoanalysis to the understanding of 
family dynamics and family therapy. 
Moore W 2-5 Spring 



CTS CM 542B 

Contemporary Cultures of Psychology 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Miller -McLemore M 2-5 



Spring 



G-ETS 32-602 

Gender Issues in the Psychology of Religion 

Gender issues and their implications for pastoral 
care. Based on suggestions in contemporary psy- 
chology and neurotheology of different approaches 
to life by men and women, especially psychological 
experiences of autonomy and relatedness. 
Rector TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-609 

The Working Brain and the Work of Theology 

The knowledge of the way the brain works — neu- 
ropsychological^ — is used as an analytical 
metaphor to organize the human condition in his- 
torical and theological expressions. These are 
assessed as to adequate, deficient, or disturbed func- 
tioning for the purpose of identifying ways to 
enhance fuller human functioning. A seminar. 
Limit: 16. Level II and III students. Prereq: 32-501 



or equiv. 
Asrti?rook 



TTK 3:30-5 



Spring 



G-ETS 32-612 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry 

This course provides a context for students to 
obtain an in-depth look at cultural dimensions of 
human experience. It can serve as a point for 
debriefing and further reflection on cross-cultural 
experience or as preparation for such an experi- 
ence. The focus is on applications for functioning 
in a pastoral role/relationship in cross-cultural con- 
texts. Limit: 20. 
Hinkle F9-12 Spring 



G-ETS 32-620 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Hinkle Th 3:30-5 



Spring 



G-ETS 32-633 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups 

Application of principles of group therapy to prac- 
tice of ministry in multicultural contexts. Prereq: 
32-632. Limit: 20. 
Hinkle Th 6-9 P.M. Spring 



LSTCM-320 
Pastoral Care 

A foundational course in pastoral ministry consist- 
ing of historical and theological perspectives for 
pastoral care as well as contemporary situation-ori- 
ented workshops. Regular consultation between 
classroom and Teaching Parish staff as well as peri- 
odic inclusion of the latter in classroom workshops 
provide for an integrated approach. 
Mrrum MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Billman M 7-9:50 P.M. Spring 

MTS M-333 

Pastoral Care in the Black Church 

Pastoral care in the African- American community 
has two foci: personal and social transformation. 
We will examine the practical and theological 
resources required for effective pastoral care; relate 
pastoral care in the black church to education, 
preaching, worship, social ministry and cultural 
affirmation. 
Ashby W 6-9 P.M. Spring 

MTS M-455 

Pastoral Care with Women 

Drawing from feminist theology, women's spiritual- 
ity and pastoral care literature, this course will 
explore new models for pastoral care with women 
and men. Attention will be given to women's 
development and experience as well as to dynamic 
issues for male pastors. 
McWilliams T 1-3:50 Spring 

NPTSMNST-122 
Marriage and Family 

Marriage enrichment groups are supplemented with 
case method, readings and guest presentations to 
equip counseling and congregational ministries to 
the needs of marriages and families. 
Jackson M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

NPTSMNST-126 
Advanced Counseling Skills 

The uniqueness of the parish context is viewed as 
an asset for pastoral counseling. The model is time- 
limited counseling, utilizing an assessment instru- 
ment and practical applications. 
Robinson MW 2-3:30 Spring 

NBTS PC 402 
Pastoral Care and Aging 

A study of the experience and dynamics of aging as 
understood within the life cycle and the develop- 
ment of skills in the pastoral care of aging persons. 
While the emphasis is on older adults, aging is seen 
as a lifetime process and as an issue for all persons. 
Justes W 9:30-12:15 Spring 



104 



NBTS PC 405 

Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral Care 

An examination of the place of human sexuality in 

self-fulfillment and self-understanding, especially as 

it relates to the pastoral care ministry of the 

church. 

Justes TTh 1-2:20 Spring 



IV, LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

BTS M-474 
Music in Worship 

A study of hymnody — the theology, music, 
singing of hymns — with special emphasis on the 
function of music in the life of the local congrega- 
tion. Historical and contemporary music will be 
surveyed, including not only American "mainline" 
church music, but music from various cultures and 
traditions. 
Faus T 2-30-5:10 Spring 

BTS M-475 

Worship in the Church 

A study of worship and music as expressed in the 
Free Church tradition. The theology and structure 
of worship will be analyzed, but each person will be 
encouraged to become aware of his or her own 
expressive gifts and thus use them in the planning 
and leading of corporate worship. 
Faus WF 1-2:20 Spring 

CTU W 350 
Introduction to Liturgy 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Francis MW 1041:15 Spring 

CTU W 355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

A basic course in sacraments which will explore 
the human religious experience of the faith com- 
munity and its expression in sacramental celebra- 
tion. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults will 
serve as a basis for the examination of new sacra- 
mental models. 
Ostdiek MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU W455 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: 

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Hughes 



M 7-9:30 P.M. 



Spring 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 

CTU W 625 

Liturgy in a Multi-Cultural Community 

This seminar will explore the complex nature of 
liturgical ministry in a worshiping community com- 
posed of different cultural groups. Guided by the 
liturgy documents and anthropological studies on 
ritual, the course will try to address the question, 
"How can liturgy be a source of unity rather than 
division in this setting?" Limit: 12. 
Francis T 10-12-30 Spring 

CTU W 632 
Music in Ritual 

This interdisciplinary seminar will examine music's 
function in human ritual and, more specifically, in 
Christian ritual. Initial work in the behavioral and 
social sciences will prepare the groundwork for the- 
ological reflection on the role and meaning of 
music in today's worship. 
Foley M 10-1230 Spring 

LSTC M-484 

Ritual and Pastoral Care 

An exploration on the interface between pastoral 
care and the occasional services of the church. 
How does the church's liturgical life meet the 
many human needs that attend baptism, marriage, 
confirmation, services of healing, or Christian 
funerals? Reflections on pastoral skills and theolog- 
ical understandings. 
Bangert/Billman TTK 1-2:15 Spring 

MTSM-314 

Understanding the Dynamics of 

Corporate Worship 

We begin by studying the nature of authentic, cor- 
porate Christian worship, from theological, histori- 
cal and pastoral perspectives. In light of that under- 
standing, we then explore what gives integrity to 
the sacraments, order of worship, public prayers, 
weddings, funerals, music in worship, children in 
worship and observance of the Christian year. 
Wardlaw MW 10-11:50 Spring 

S-WTS 09-504S 

The History and Principles of 

Liturgical Worship 

A basic introduction to liturgical studies. The 
meaning of liturgical worship and its place in 
Christian life, its expression in the classical litur- 
gies of the early Church, Middle Ages, and 
Reformation, and its renewal in the contemporary 
Liturgical Movement with particular emphasis on 
the Eucharist. 
Mitchell TTK 9-10:50 Spring 



105 



Preaching and Communication 



S-WTS11-516S 
Church Music IB 

(For course description, see Fall S-WTS 11-515S. 

Prereq: 11-515S.) 

Finster M 1040:50 Spring 

V. PREACHING 
AND COMMUNICATION 

CTU MW452 

Preaching Retreats and Parish Missions/Renewals 

Pastoral and theological skills for leaders of retreats 
and parish missions/renewals include designing and 
programming such gatherings, as well as writing 
and preaching retreat and renewal conferences. In 
developing these skills, this course uses narrative, 
conversion story and personal testimony and 
emphasizes the religious, social and cultural milieu 
of the renewal events. Prereq: MW450 or equiv.; 
limit: 12. 
Hang M 2-30-5 Spring 

CTU MW457 

Preaching in a Multi-Cultural Context: 

Hispanic Preaching 

This advanced practicum addresses the issue of lec- 
tionary preaching in an Hispanic setting. In a sys- 
tematic and practical manner, students will prepare 
and deliver homilies for such assemblies and 
receive critique and encouragement in developing 
a unique style of preaching. Prereq: MW 450 or 
equiv. Limit: 12. 
Fragomeni/Riebe-EstreUa T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTS CM 302 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching min- 
istry. The approach will emphasize both the art of 
sermon preparation and the place of preaching in 
pastoral ministry. Limited to second and third year 
students. Limit: 12 each section. 
Edgerton Sec. A: M 9-12:40 Spring 

Sec. B.W 9-1 2:40 

G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Chatfield A WF 9-10:50 Spring 

ChatfieldB MW 5:40-7-30 p.m. Spring 

LSTCM-451 
Senior Seminar 11 

Offers students in their final year the opportunity 
to review and deepen their understanding of the 
task of preaching. 
KrentzJJemen MW 830-9:45 Spring 



LSTC M-453 
Christianity and Comedy 

What constitutes a comic vision of life, and what 
does that vision contribute to our Christian intelli- 
gence and sensibility? Responses to these questions 
are the focus of this seminar. Readings chiefly in 
fictional works of comedy plus critical essays. 
Niedenthal T 830-9:45; 10:45-12 Spring 

MTS M-332K 

Preaching and Worship in the Korean-American 

Church (Taught in Korean) 

This course introduces the students to styles, 

resources, and content for preaching and worship 

in the church. Special attention will be given to 

creating liturgy and sermons which are appropriate 

to the Korean immigrant, multigenerational 

church. 

D. K. Kim M 6-9 p.m. Spring 

MTS M-446 

Preaching and the Preacher's Devotional Life 

This class will explore the intricate connection 
between quality preaching and the preacher's devo- 
tional life. Students will explore resources for a 
quality devotional life within the classical devo- 
tional tradition and the modern work of Howard 
Thurman, Oswald Chambers, Thomas Merton and 
others. Devotional periodicals and literature will 
also be examined. Prereq: Intro, course in preach- 
ing. Class limit: 12. 
Thomas Th 5-8 P.M. Spring 

MTS/LSTCM-419H 
Del Texto al Sermon 

Exegesis del texto biblico desde una prespectiva 
comunitaria como preparacion para la predicacion 
en la congregacion hispana. Se hara enfasis en la 
reflexion contextual en un ambiente de grupo 
hacia realizar el proceso de: Analysis — Biblia — 
Accion. Este curso es intensivo de una semana. 
TBA TBA Spring 

M/L1325 
Communication Arts 

Rhetoric and the use of the voice in public speak- 
ing. A half-credit course meeting once a week and 
taught by the Artistic Director of the Court 
Theatre. 
RudaU M 330-5 Spring 

M/LM367 

Arts of Ministry: Preaching and Worship 

This course focuses on preaching and the conduct 
of worship. What are the nature and function of 
public rhetoric, rites and services in the liberal 
church and in the larger community? What modes 



106 



Educational Ministry 



of religious address and worship leadership are most 
appropriate and effective for liberal ministry? How 
can our individual gifts in these offices be maxi- 
mized? Students will share samples of their work for 
class discussion. 
Staff W 1:30-4 Spring 

NPTSMNST-110 
Effective Communication 

The pastor must be an effective communicator. 
Basic verbal and non-verbal factors in the delivery 
of a speech will be reviewed and practiced. Two 
hours credit. 
Koptak MWTh 8-9: 1 5 Spring 

NPTSMNST-211 
Pastoral Preaching 

Middlers are prepared for internship and later min- 
istry by developing a theology for the pastor's 
preaching task and by preparation and delivery of 
sermons for evangelism, teaching and the funeral. 
Nortn MWTK 8-9: 15 + lab Spring 

NPTSMNST-217 
Women and the Word 

An examination of theological, social, historical 
and other communications issues pertaining to 
women and preaching. Sermons, videotapes and 
other resources will be used in analyzing the con- 
tent and styles of preaching by women representing 
various traditions and historical periods, with 
implications for contemporary ministry. 
Norin M 25 Spring 

NBTS MN383 
Practice of Preaching 

This course intends to provide a supervised "lab" 
experience in both the practice and evaluation of 
preaching. 1 credit hour. 

EuderlDuffet Sec. J: T 2:305:15 Spring 

Sec. 2: T 6:30-9:15 P.M. 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

BTS M-494 
Educational Ministry 

A look at the educational function of the church 
from a theological perspective, in terms of the role 
of the teacher and the intended influence on the 
student. Theories of the religious imagination and 
of the educational process will be presented while 
looking at particular Christian Education curricu- 



lum asking the questions, "What makes this 
Christian?" and "What makes this educational?". 
Front* TTK 1-2:20 Spring 

CTS CM 322 
Ministry with Youth 

Offering three distinct youth ministry models, this 
course emphasizes team and peer ministry, distinct 
leadership styles, getting in touch with one's own 
adolescence, developmentally based retreats, 
covenantal discipline, and symbol-making. 
Resources and issues of youth will be critical. 
Discussion with city and suburban youth will high- 
light the course. 
W. Myers M 25 Spring 

G-ETS 33-502 

Teaching for Biblical Faith 

An exploration of the nature of the Bible and its 
role in Christian education and the construction of 
faith. Particular attention to approaches to teach- 
ing the Bible as the church's book of faith and life. 
Limit: 40. 
Seymour (L . Vogel TTh I -30-3 : 20 Spring 

G-ETS 33-611 

Youth, Culture, and Church 

Design of strategies for the Church's ministry with 
youth and young adults. Issues relating rhythms of 
young people's lives in cultural settings with 
dynamics of family, school, church and peer groups, 
e.g., disaffected youth, pressures for achievement, 
media, gangs. 
FeUciano TTh 9 40:50 Spring 

LSTC M-460 

Educational Ministry with Youth 

This course deals with the theological and develop- 
mental principles guiding a ministry with youth, 
examining the human and media resources avail- 
able from a variety of groups, and exploring the set- 
tings and strategies that can be employed in min- 
istry and youth. 
Conrad Th 7-9:50 P.M. Spring 

M/LM306 

Religious Education and the Changing Family 

This course will focus on the changing role of the 
family in North America and its implications for 
religious education ministry. Issues examined will 
include the needs of families with small children, 
non-traditional families, such as single parent 
households, elders and merged households, as well 
as adolescent sexuality, domestic violence and the 
nature of congregational support. 
Harlow M 2-4:30 Spring 




107 



Educational Ministry 



Polity and Canon Law 



NPTS MNST- 135 

Adult Ministries in the Church 

Adult development and the theology and opera- 
tional principles for adult ministry in the church 
and community are the foci for this course. Various 
ministry models and resources are examined and 
evaluated. 
TBA MW77i8-9:J5 Spring 

NPTS MNST-239 
Management of Youth Ministry 

Managing of junior high, high school and college 
students ministries including: 1) the recruitment 
and development of youth leaders; 2) development 
of student leadership; 3) working with and support- 
ing parents; 4) planning and budgeting; and 5) 
relating to other church ministries and boards, 
para-church groups and community structures. 



Sutf 



M2-5 



Spring 



NPTS MNST-249 

Resources for Parents of Youth 

Parenting resources will provide an in-depth look 
at several parenting issues including discipline, 
abuse, faith development, eating disorders, and 
others, with a view to understanding outcomes and 
prdviding resources. 
G. Anderson T/i 2-5 Spring 

NBTSED501 

Seminar in Theology and Christian Education 

This seminar will provide a context for discussing 
major contemporary theological movements which 
have shaped major religious educators in the latter 
half of the twentieth century. Students will present 
and discuss a theological essay which integrates a 
theological perspective with the educational theory 
of a major religious educator. 
Jenkins T 6:30-9.15 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 14-610S 
Educational Basics 

An introduction to the principles and methods of 
developing and sustaining Christian educational 



programs in the parish. We will deal with such 
issues as developmental stages, "teachable 
moments" in the life of the parish, and training 
Church School teachers. 
Ross WF 940:50 Spring 

TEDS CE 502 

Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Christian Education 

Survey and criticism of educational philosophies, 
especially those which have affected the church's 
ministry of education; work toward the formation 
of one's own philosophy of Christian education. 
Cannell TBA Spring 



VII. POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 

CTUMW421 
Church and Structure 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Neville MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTS CH 367 

History and Polity 

of the United Church of Christ 

(For course description, see Historical Studies II.) 
Smith et at. Th 6-30-9-30 P.M . Spring 

G-ETS 40-674 

United Methodist Studies: 

John Wesley/Nineteenth Century 

A study of the foundational contribution of John 
Wesley to the history, doctrine and polity of 
emerging Methodism, based on his sermons, letters 
and treatise; and the development of the 
Methodist, Evangelical, and United Brethren 
churches through the nineteenth century. 5 hour 
course, meeting Discipline requirement for doctrine 
and history. (1.25 units credit). 
Stein/Tuule W 9-10:50 F 9-1 1:50 Spring 



108 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST 
WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 



In this section abbreviated listings (institution, course number, course title, 
professor) are given for courses in seven special areas of interest in the theological 
curriculum, with page references for locating full course descriptions. 

AFRICAN * AMERICAN STUDIES 



FALL 

G-ETS 13-641 
LSTCT-311 
LSTC T-430 
MTSB-451 
NPTS MNST-215 
SCUPEM301 

WINTER 

CTU C 548 
CTU D 576 
G-ETS 21-634 
G-ETS 22-641 
LSTC T-434 
NBTS CTNT 400 

NBTS TH 433 

SPRING 
G-ETS 22-639 
MTS M-333 
MTS M-446 
NBTS CH 360 



African- American Religious History: Journey of Faith and Freedom II (Murphy) , p. 45 

Christian Theology I (Pero) , p. 46 

Black Theology and the Black. Church (Pero) , p. 48 

Biblical Interpretation from an Afro-Centric Perspective (Granston) , p. 39 

Preaching as Celebraton (Thomas) , p. 60 

The African- American Church in the Urban Setting (Martin) , p. 55 



Witchcraft and Sorcery in Pastoral Perspective (Gktins) , p. 77 

Black Theology in Dialogue (Phelps) , p. 72 

Theology of Howard Thurman (Young) , p. 72 

African- American Critical Thought (Eugene) , p. 75 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Pero) , p. 72 

The Color of Christ: Christianity, Racism and the American Revolutionary 

Tradition (Cosgrove) , p. 67 
Contemporary Perspectives in African- American Theology (Butler) , p. 72 



Pastoral Ministry with African-American Families (Eugene) , p. 100 
Pastoral Care in the Black Church (Ashby) , p. 104 
Preaching and the Preacher's Devotional Life (Thomas), p. 106 
History of African American Religious Experience (Butler) , p. 94 



ASIAN STUDIES 



FALL 
LSTC W-424 

LSTC W-429 
MTSB-401K 
MTS B-403K 
MTSE-415K 
MTSH-416K 
MTSM-331K 
MTST-441K/T-659K 
NPTS MNST-325 

WINTER 
CTU CW570 
MTSB-321K/322K 
MTS B-324K/325K 
MTS H-300 
MTS M-307K 

MTS M-348K 
MTS T-303K . 



Conflict and Reconciliation: Christian Encounter with People of Other 

Faith Commitments (lshida/Than/Vogelaar) , p. 53 
World Religions (Lindberg) , p. 53 
The Gospel of John (C.H. Park), p. 41 
The Epistles of Paul (C.H. Park), p. 41 
Readings in Ethics (Chun) , p. 51 

The History of the Korean Church from 1884-1988 (Lee), p. 44 
Stewardship in the Korean-American Church (A. Kim) , p. 54 
Immigrant Theology and Ministry (Kong) , p. 47 
Pastoral Care in Korean-American Churches (Lee) , p. 58 



Comparative Ritual: Christianity in Asia (Kaserow) , p. 77 
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I, II (Han) , p. 65 
Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II (Cha), p. 68 
Transformations of Christianity (Sawyer) , p. 68 
Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship in the Presbyterian 

Church (U.S.A.), (WorleyfKang) , p. 87 
Pastoral Counseling in the Korean Church (Doh) , p. 82 
Readings in Theology (Chun) , p. 74 



109 



SPRING 

CTSTEC418 
LSTC W-425 
MTS B-322K 
MTS B-325K 
MTS M-332K 
MTS M-346K 



Theologies of Asia (Jennings) , p. 97 

Buddhist-Christian Dialogue (Than) , p. 101 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I, II (Han) , p. 90 

Greek II (CM, p. 93 

Preaching and Worship in the Korean-American Church (D.K. Kim) , p. 106 

Church Administration (Chun) , p. 102 



CROSS-CULTURAL studies 



FALL 

CTU/MTS I 575 
G-ETS 21-500 
G-ETS 32-620 
LSTCM-416 
MTS/CTU 1-460 
M/LM312 



Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar (Kaserow) , p. 52 

Contexts and Methods for Contemporary Theology (D. Vogel) , p. 45 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling (Hinkle) , p. 57 

Local Immersion (Lindberg) , p. 54 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry ( Barbour /Doidge) , p. 52 

Multicultural Religious Education (Harlow) , p. 61 



WINTER 
CTUD441 
CTUD610 
CTU/MTS I 575 
CTS TEC 525 
G-ETS 2 1-681 A 
G-ETS 2 1-68 IB 
G-ETS 32-620 
G-ETS 33-628 
G-ETS 33-681 
G-ETS 34-616 
MTS/CTU 1-460 
MS P1392 
MSSY317 
NPTSMNST-154 
NBTS TH 420 

SPRING 
CTU C 400 
CTU D 446 
CTUMP525 
CTU MW457 

CTU W 625 
CTU/MTS C 593 
CTU/MTS 1575 
G-ETS 32-612 
G-ETS 32-620 
LSTC W-423 
LSTC W-425 
MTS/CTU C-470 
MS MS330 
NPTSMNST-151 
NBTS CT 310 
SCUPE M 304 
TEDS ME 675 



Christology and Cultures (Schreiter) , p. 73 

Theological Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Perspective (Schreiter) , p. 73 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar (Kaserow) , p. 77 

Homosexuality in Theoretical and Ethical Perspective (Jennings) , p. 73 

Eastern Europe: Vision and Praxis of Shalom (Will), p. 73 

Liberation Theology: Haiti and Cuba (Ruether) , p. 73 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling (Hinkle) , p. 82 

Ethnicity and Cultural Pluralism in Christian Education (Feliciano) , p. 85 

Cross-Cultural Travel Seminar: New Mexico (TBA), p. 85 

Cross-Cultural Evangelism (Tutde) , p. 79 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry (Barbour IDoidge) , p. 77 

Cross-Cultural Ministry (FoUiard) , p. 77 

Christology in a Pluralistic Age (Lefebure) , p. 74 

Christianity and Culture (Weld) , p. 78 

Theology in Context (Sharp) , p. 74 



The Experience of Religion (Kaserow) , p. 100 
Missionary Dynamics of the Church (Riebe-EstreUa) , p. 97 
Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context (Anderson), p. 103 
Preaching in a Multi-Cultural Context: Hispanic Preaching 

(FragornenifRiebe~Estrella) , p. 106 
Liturgy in a Multi-Cultural Community (Francis), p. 105 
Lakota/Christian Dialogue (Barbour) , p. 101 
Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar (Staff) , p. 101 
Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry (Hinkle), p. 104 
Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling (Hinkle) , p. 104 
World Mission of the Church (Scherer) , p. 101 
Buddhist-Christian Dialogue (Than), p. 101 
Mission-in-Reverse: Theory and Praxis (Doidge) , p. 101 

Inculturation, Evangelization and Hispanic Popular Religiosity (Mendez) , p. 101 
Cultural Dimensions in Missions (Weld) , p. 101 

Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural Approach (Mottesi/Butler) , p. 100 
Christology and Culture (Pinto/ Bakke) , p. 98 
Intercultural Ministry (McKinney) , p. 101 



110 



HISPANIC STUDIES 



FALL 

CTU CD460 
CTS TEC 445 
LSTC T-459H 
LSTCT-510 
MTS B-300 
MTS/LSTC L311H 
NBTSBL301LH 
NBTS MN 382H 
NBTS PC 405H 
NBTS TH440H 

WINTER 

CTU C 465 
CTU CD456 
LSTC/MTSB-324H 
MTS H-485H 
NBTS BL 302LH 
NBTSIN311H 
NBTS MN 383H 
NBTS TH 472H 



U.S. Latino Theology (Riebe-EstreUa) , p. 47 

Base Christian Community (Cams) , p. 48 

Temas Principales de la Teologia Latinoamericana (Rodriquez) , p. 48 

God in Latin America (WestheUe) , p. 49 

Introduction to Biblical Studies (Vena) , p. 37 

Orientacion a la Investigacion Bibliografica Teologica (Wallace) , p. 46 

Hebreo I/Hebrew I (Homing) , p. 39 

Predicacion: Una Perspective Pastoral (Mottesi) , p. 60 

Amor y Sexualidad (Schipani) , p. 58 

Educacion y Teologia (Schipani) , p. 62 



Toward a Theology of Ministry in the Hispanic Community (Pineda) , p. 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity (Riebe-EstreUa) , p. 72 

Griego I (Vena) , p. 67 

Historia de la Iglesia Hispana en los E.E.U.U. (Rodr6guez-Diaz) , p. 69 

Hebreo II/Hebrew II (Homing) , p. 65 

Evangeli2acion, Salvacion y Justica (Mouesi) , p. 71 

La Practica de la Predicacion Pastoral (Mottesi) , p. 85 

Hacia una Cristologia Iberoamericana (Escobar) , p. 72 



71 



SPRING 
CTU C 458 
CTU D 446 
CTU MW457 

LSTCT-313 
MTS/LSTC H-428 
MTS/LSTC M-419H 
MTS/LSTC B-325H 
MTSH-416H 
MS HI 369 
MS MS330 
NBTSBL421LH 
NBTSIN310H 
NBTS NT 404H 
NBTS NT 450H 



Hispanic Faith and Culture (Pineda) , p. 96 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church (Riebe-EstreUa) , p. 97 

Preaching in a Multi- Cultural Context: Hispanic Preaching 

(Fragomeni/Riebe-Estrella) , p. 106 
Christian Theology III (RodriguezJWesthelle) , p. 96 
History, Theology, Hermeneutics (J. Gonzdlez) , p. 95 
Del Texto al Sermon (TBA) , p. 106 
Griego II (Vena) , p. 92 

Historia de la Iglesia en Latinoamerica y el Caribe (Rodriguez-Diaz) , p. 94 
The Catholic Church in Latin America I (Hennessey) , p. 94 
Inculturation, Evangelization and Hispanic Popular Religiosity (Mendez) , p. 101 
Exegesis of Selections from I and II Samuel and I and II Kings (Homing) , p. 89 
El Arte de la Interpretacion en la Formacion Pastoral (Nelson) , p. 102 
El Evangelio de Juan (Weiss) , p. 91 
Nuevo Testamento: Una lectural tercermundista (Weiss), p. 92 



JUDAIC STUDIES 



FALL 
CTU B 465 
CTU B 525 
G-ETS 21-643 
NPTSB1BL-241 

WINTER 
CTU B 417 
G-ETS 12/13-681 



Liturgy of the Synagogue I (Perebmuter) , p. 41 
Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish Background (Perelmuier) , p. 41 
Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought (Schaabnann) , p. 48 
Jews, Christians, and the Bible (Holmgren) , p. 39 



Intertestamental Literature (Hoppe) , p. 63 

Biblical Archaeology: Excavations at Tel Nessana (Groh) , 



67 



111 



SPRING 

CTU B 466 Liturgy of the Synagogue II (Perelmuter) , p. 91 

CTU SB629 Jewish Mysticism and Messianism (Perelmuter) , p. 103 

G-ETS 2 1 -644 The Liturgy of the Synagogue (Schaalmann) , p. 96 

LSTC E-44 1 Israel-Palestine Conflict (MarshaRfVogebar) , p. 99 

LSTC M-421 Jewish Perspectives on Ministry (Berman) , p. 102 

MTS B-434 The Life Cycles of Judaism (Tanzer) , p. 89 

MS BI389 Jewish/Christian Dialogue (Lodge) , p. 92 

TEDS OT 845B The Hebrew Bible, Rabbinical Commentary and the Septuagint (SaiUvvmer) , p. 90 

URBAN AND PUBLIC POLICY STUDIES 
FALL 

BTS M-397 The Church in the North American Context (Front?) , p. 51 

CTU C 409 Mission on the Margins: Homelessness in the City (Gktins) , p. 52 

CTU E 588 Seminar on Christ, Ethics and Community (Fomasari) , p. 51 

CTU I 435 Biblical and Ethical Aspects of Ecology (Bergant/Wadell) , p. 51 

CTU M 409 Ministry on the Margins (Szura) , p. 53 

CTS I 460 Health Ministries Seminar (Mainor et al.) , p. 51 

G-ETS 22-504 Church and Community (Eugene) , p. 51 

LSTC M-370 Introduction to Public Ministry (Bloomquist/Strehlow) , p. 52 

LSTC M-4 16 Local Immersion (Lindberg) , p. 54 

MTS M-350 The Church as a Health Resource (Mainor) , p. 54 

MTS M-375 Church Based Organizing: A Strategy for Ministry in the 

Urban Setting (Mariano/Galluzzo) , p. 54 

MA- E 438 Spirit and Nature: Religion, Ethics and Ecology (Engel) , p. 51 

M/L M 3 1 2 Multicultural Religious Education (Harlow) , p. 61 

MA- M 366 Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry (ShadlefEngel) , p. 54 

MS PI308 Ministry to Hearing Impaired Persons (Mulcrone/Schlesinger) , p. 55 
NPTS MNST-260 Metropolitan Evangelism (Reed) , p. 55 

SCUPE B-TH 30 1 The Corinthian Church: A Biblical Approach to Urban Culture (Scott) , p. 42 

SCUPE M 301 The African-American Church in the Urban Setting (Martin) , p. 55 

SCUPE M 304 Introduction to Urban Ministry (Hawkins/Leslie) , p. 55 

SCUPE S-H 301 Conceptions of a City (Cooper IMcGibbon) , p. 52 

WINTER 

CTU C 409 Mission on the Margins: Homelessness in the City (Gittins) , p. 77 

CTU E 425 World Poverty, Development and Life's Liberation (Fomasari) , p. 76 

CTU E 545 Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience (Fomasari) , p. 76 

CTU E 55 1 Spirituality/Liturgy and the Quest for Justice (Pawlikowski) , p. 75 

CTU M 409 Ministry on the Margins (Szura) , p. 79 

CTS 1 461 Health Ministries Seminar (Mainor et al.) , p. 76 

G-ETS 22-502 The Church and Social Systems (Ruether) , p. 76 

LSTC M-370 Introduction to Public Ministry (Folk) , p. 76 

LSTC M-4 16 Local Immersion (Lindberg) , cf. p. 54 

MTS E-404 Contemporary Christian Political Ethics (Hadsell) , p. 76 

MTS E/M-431 The Churches and the City: Ethical Issues in Urban Ministry (Uvezey) , p. 76 

SCUPE M 300 January Term in Chicago (Cooper) , p. 76 

SCUPE M 302 Evangelization and Urban Congregations (D'Amico) , p. 80 

SCUPE S-H 302 Transforming Urban System^ (Cooper) , p. 77 

TEDS PT 723 Social and Cultural Exegesis (Speer) , p. 77 



12 



SPRING 

BTS T-439 Theology of the Urban Church (Wagner) , p. 97 

CTU C 409 Mission on the Margins: Homelessness in the City (Gittins) , p. 100 

CTU E 444 Ethical Issues in Economics and Business (Pawlikowski) , p. 99 

CTU M 409 Ministry on the Margins (Szura) , p. 102 

CTS CH 490 Religious and Social History of Chicago (Stebner) , p. 95 

CTS 1 462 Health Ministries Seminar (Mctinor et al.) , p. 100 

CTS TEC 496 Good and Evil (Thistlethwaiie) , p. 97 

G-ETS 1 2/22-625 The Bible and Civil Religion (Keller) , p. 92 

LSTC M-4 16 Local Immersion (Lindberg) , cf. p. 54 

M/L E 399 Religion and Democracy in the Liberal Tradition (Engel) , p. 99 

M/L E 538 Ecology, Justice and Faith (Engel) , p. 99 

NBTS CT 3 10 Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural Approach (Mottesi/Butler) , p. 100 

SCUPE M 304 Christology and Culture (Pinto/ Bakke) , p. 98 

SCUPE S-H 303 Dynamics and Development of the Modern Industrial City (HaUett) , p. 100 

TEDS PT725 Understanding the Urban World (Speer) , p. 100 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 



FALL 

G-ETS 21-636 
G-ETS 22-640 
MTS T-433 



Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective (Ruether) , p. 48 
Seminar in Woman ist Ethics and Theology (Eugene) , p. 50 
Feminist Theology (Case -Winters) , p. 49 



WINTER 

CTU B 537 Women in the Gospel of Luke (Reid) , p. 66 

CTU D 449 Marian Dogmas and Symbols (Brennan) , p. 73 

CTS TEC 525 Homosexuality in Theoretical and Ethical Perspective (Jennings) , p. 73 

LSTC M-435 Pastoral Care and Counseling with Women (Billman) , p. 82 

LSTC M-463 Christian Education: Baptism through Confirmation (Johnson) , p. 85 

NPTS BIBL-280 Women, the Bible and the Church (Schokr) , p. 67 

NBTS CH 410 Women Leaders in the Pre-Reformation Churches (Rodgerson Pleasants) , p. 70 

SPRING 

CTS TEC 496 Good and Evil (Thistkthuxdte) , p. 97 

G-ETS 22-604 Feminist Ethics (KeUer/Ruether) , p. 99 

G-ETS 32-602 Gender Issues in the Psychology of Religion (Rector) , p. 104 

MTS M-455 Pastoral Care with Women (McWiUiams) , p. 104 

M/L M 306 Religious Education and the Changing Family (Harlow) , p. 107 

NPTS MNST-2 1 7 Women and the Word (Noren) , p. 1 07 

NBTS PC 405 Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral Care (Justes) , p. 105 

S-WTS 08-6 12S Ethics and Human Sexuality (Sedgwick) , p. 99 



113 



ACTS PERSONNEL 



FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 



Carol Allen (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Religious 
Education 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.Div., 
Colgate Rochester Divinity School; M.S.W., 
Tulane University School of Social Work; 
M.T.S., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary; Study: Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 

Frances M. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.S.N. , University of Nebraska; B.R.E, North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 



Richard Augspurger (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.Sc, Ohio State University; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Raymond J. Bakke (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Ministry; (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Seattle Pacific 
College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; S.T.M., D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Henry Baldwin, F.S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., 
George Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate 
Conception Seminary, Mahwah, N.J. 



Grant Anderson (NPTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Christian Education 

B.Mus.Ed., American Conservatory of Music; 
M.Mus.Ed., De Paul University, Ed.D. Cand., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., 
Augustana Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

Philip J. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Regent's Park 
College, University of Oxford. 

James Barbour Ashbrook (G-ETS) Senior Scholar 
m Religion and Personality 

A.B., Denison University; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University; LL.D., Denison University. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care and Director of the Joint African- American 
Ministries Program of the Hyde Park Cluster 
B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 



Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Semmex 
Professor of Worship and Music 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Study: Indiana 
University; Northwestern University; St. John's 
University. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU/MTS) Professor of 
World Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 
S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (S-WTS) Assistant 
Professor of Historical Theology 
B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Div., Yale 
University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robert Barron (MS) Department of Systematics 

S.T.B., S.T.L., M.Div., S.T.D. cand., University 
of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., Catholic 
University of America; Study: Institut 
Catholique de Paris. 

Dorothy C. Bass (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Union 
Theological Seminary and Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Brown University. 



14 



Barry J. Beitiel (TEDS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Semitic Languages; Associate Academic Dean 
B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University; Ph.D., The 
Dropsie University. 

August J. Belauskas (MS) Director of Pre-Theology 
Program; Instructor, Department of Pre- 
Theology; Associate Dean of Formation 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., Ph.D. cand., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Linda L. Belleville (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Biblical Literature 

B.M., University of Rochester, Eastman School 
of Music; M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of St. Michael's 
College. 

Warren S. Benson (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education, Vice President of Professional Doctoral 
Programs and Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A., Northwestern College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.R.E., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Michelle W. Bentley (M/L) Lecturer in Ministry 
Studies and Dean of Students 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Northeast 
Illinois University; M.Div., Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis 
University. 

Howard A. Berman (LSTC) Jewish Chautauqua 
Society Visiting Lecturer m Ministry 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.A.H.L., Hebrew Union College; Study: 
University of London; Hebrew University of 
Jerusalem; Leo Baeck College. 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., 
Pontifical Gregorian University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame; Study: University of 
Cambridge. 

Gilbert Bilezikian (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Biblical Studies 
B.A., University of Paris; M.Div., Gordon- 



Conwell Theological Seminary; Th.D., Boston 
University. 

Kathleen D. Billman (LSTC) Assistant Professor 
of Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Phyllis A. Bird (G-ETS) Associate Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Th.D., 
Harvard Divinity School; Study: University of 
Heidelberg. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament, Emeritus 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study: 
Uppsala University; American School of 
Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Donald Bloesch (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Evangelical Spirituality 

B.A., Elmhurst College; B.D., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago; Study: Oxford University; 
University of Basel; University of Tubingen. 

Richard A. Bodey (TEDS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Professor of Old Testament 
B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University; Study: American 
School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Steven C. Bouma-Prediger (NPTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Theology 

A.B., Hope College; M.Phil., Institute for 
Christian Studies; M.Div., Fuller Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago. 

Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manhattanville College; M.Ed., Boston 
College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; 
Th.D., Harvard University. 



115 



Patrick J. Boyle, S.J. (MS) Oeconomus Assistant 
Professor, Department of Christian Life 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Ph.D., Marquette 
University. 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Paris (Sorbonne); Sinclair Kennedy Traveling 
Fellow, University of Heidelberg. 

Robert L. Brawley (MTS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Erskine College; S.T.M., Lutheran 
Theological Southern Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Benbur Priory; M.A., Stonebridge Priory; 
M.A., Ph.D., DePaul University. 

Brent Bromstrup (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Ministry 

B.S., Seattle Pacific University; M.Div., 
Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of Christian 
Theology 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Harold O. J. Brown (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology, Franklin Forman Chair 
of Christian Ethics and Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; S.T.B., Th.M., 
Harvard Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study: Marburg University. 

Mitchell Brown (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Hebrew 
Bible 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Study: University of 
Notre Dame. 

Michael A. Bullmore (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Wheaton 
College; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 



Ralph Wendell Burhoe (M/L) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology and Science 
Sc.D., Meadville/Lombard Theological School. 

John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology 

B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California; Study: 
University College, London. 

Richard P. Busse (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.T.S., Th.M., 
Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Historical Theology 

B.S., Southern University; M.Div., Virginia 
Union University School of Theology; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Sara Butler, M.S.B.T. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
B.S., Fordham School of Education; M.A., 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D., 
Fordham University; S.T.L., University of St. 
Mary of the Lake. 

Richard R. Caemmerer, Jr. (LSTC) Visiting 
Professor of Theology and Art 
B.F.A., Washington University; M.F.A., 
Indiana University; Diploma, University of 
Heidelberg. 

George E Cairns, Jr. (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Ministry and Psychology; Director, Doctor of 
Ministry Program. 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 
University; M.Div., Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 

Alva R. Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/ 
S-WTS 

B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; D.Min. cand., Mundelein Seminary of 
the University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Elizabeth F. Caldwell (MTS) Professor of 
Educational Ministry 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Ed., 
Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University; Study: Presbyterian 



116 



School of Christian Education; University of 
North Alabama. 

Louis J. Cameli (MS) Department of Christian Life 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

Glenn Michael Cameron (BTS) Adjunct Faculty of 
Academic Research 

B.A., Central Bible College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., University 
of Chicago Divinity School. 

Nigel M. de S. Cameron (TEDS) Associate Dean 
of Academic Doctoral Programs; Director of the 
Doctor of Philosophy Program and Associate 
Professor of Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., M.A., Emmanuel College, University of 
Cambridge; B.D., Ph.D., New College, 
University of Edinburgh. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McGaw 
Professor of Old Testament 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

John F. Canary (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Christian Life 

M.A.S., University of San Francisco; S.T.L., 
D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Linda M. Cannell (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., University of Manitoba; B.R.E., Central 
Baptist Seminary; M.R.E., Ed.D., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Richard W. Carlson (NPTS) Professor of 
Ministries and Director of Field Education 
B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Donald A. Carson (TEDS) Research Professor of New 
Testament 

B.S., McGill University; M.Div., Central 
Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Church 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Div., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

John J. Cassel (BTS) Dean of Students 

B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary. 



Jungsik Cha (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in New 
Testament 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
cand., University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) President and Professor 
of Preaching 

B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., Eastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: 
University of California, Santa Barbara; 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Donald Franklin Chatfield (G-ETS) Professor of 
Preaching 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh. 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) Adjunct 
AiSsistant Professor of Eastern Christian Theology 
Ph.B., Pontifical Urban University; M.A., 
University of St. Michael's College, Toronto; 
S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
Study: University of Notre Dame. 

Jim Christian (LSTC) Instructor inMinistry 

B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex. 

Hearn Chun (MTS) Assistant Professor of Ministry 
and Theological Studies and Associate Director of 
the Korean- American Ministries Center 
B.A., Seoul National University; B.D., Perkins 
School of Theology; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
Chicago. 

William P. Clemmons (NBTS) Myers Professor of 
Pastoral Ministry and Director of the Grow 
Center for the Renewal of the Churches 
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A. 
Duquesne University; M.R.E., M.Div., Ed.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study: 
Universita' Italiana per Stranieri, Italy; 
Universita degli Study, Rome; George Peabody 
College for Teachers, Vanderbilt University. 

Robert E. Coleman (TEDS) Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of the School of World 
Mission and Evangelism 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 



117 



Robert L. Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Educational Ministry; 
Director, Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington 
University; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Charles D. Cooper (SCUPE) Program Director 

B.A., Olivet Nazarene University; M.Div., 
Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; 
D.Min., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Charles H. Cosgrove (NBTS) Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
Tubingen; 1SEDET, Buenos Aires. 

Edward J. Cronin (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation 

B.A., Niles College of Loyola University; 
M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A.S., University of San Francisco. 



William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Missions, Emeritus 
Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; 
Diploma, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Wheaton College; D.Theol., University of 
Heidelberg; Study: University of Chicago. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: Columbia 
University; Union Theological Seminary, New 
York; American Institute of Holy Land Studies; 
Asbury Theological Seminary; University of 
Tubingen. 

Tom Deal (BTS) Adjunct Faculty of Philosophy 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Southern 
Illinois University. 

Mary K. Deeley (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Old 
Testament 

B.Mus., Rosary College; M.Div., Yale 
University; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 



Roger Crum (LSTC) Instructor in Ministry 

B.S., Wisconsin State University; M.Div., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Penelope L. Cukr (CTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Health Ministries 

B.S.N. , Loyola University of Chicago School of 
Nursing; M.S.N. , Wayne State University 
College of Nursing; D.N.S., Rush University 
College of Nursing. 

Mary Janet Dahm (CTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Health Ministries 

B.S.N. , Loyola University of Chicago; M.S., 
DePaul University; M.A., Alfred Adler 
Institute. 

David F. D'Amico (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Hardin-Simmons University; M.Div., 
Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

David D. Daniels 111 (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Div., Yale University 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Union Theological 
Seminary, New York. 



Dawn A. De Vries (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., College of the University of Chicago; 
M.A., Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago 
Divinity School. 

David E. Dillon (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Judson 
College; B.A., Aurora College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
Northern Illinois University. 

Joseph Byung 11 Doh (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Keimyung University; M.A., Yonsei 
University Graduate School of Theology; 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh; Study: Seoul National University; 
University of Pittsburgh. 

Eleanor Doidge (CTU/MTS) Coordinator of Cross- 
Cultural Studies; (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Mission and Ministry 

B.A., Carlow College; M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Study: Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 



118 



John V. Dolciamore (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; J.C.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Perry G. Downs (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

Dip., Miami Christian College; B.S., 
Philadelphia College of Bible; M.A., Ph.D., 
New York University. 

Ruth Duck (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of Worship 
B.A., Rhodes College; M.Div., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; Th.D., Boston University School 
of Theology. 

Robert G. Duffett (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Preaching and Evangelism and Director of 
Doctoral Studies 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; M.Th., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa. 

A. Royce Eckhardt (NPTS) Lecturer in Hymnology 
B.M., North Park College; M.M., University of 
Hartford. 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Ministry 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

O. C. Edwards, Jr. (S-WTS) Professor of Preaching 
B.A., Centenary College of Louisiana; S.T.B., 
The General Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; D.D., Nashotah House. 

J. Ronald En gel (M/L) Professor of Social Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Juan Samuel Escobar (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., Universidad Nacional Mayor de San 
Marcos, Lima; D.Phil., Universidad Complutense 
de Madrid. 

Toinette M. Eugene (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
SocialEthics 
B.A., University of San Francisco; M.A., Jesuit 



School of Theology, Berkeley, and Graduate 
Theological Union; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Christopher H. Evenas (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
United Methodist Studies 

B.A., Syracuse University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D. cand., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University. 

Ian Evison (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 

B.A., Carleton College; D.Min., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School; M.A., Ph.D. 
cand., University of Chicago. 

Nancy R. Faus (BTS) Brightbill Professor of 
Ministry Studies, Campus Minister 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., 
Columbia University; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

John S. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of California; M.Div., Talbot 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Paul D. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
B.D., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Roosevelt University; Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago. 

Juan G. Feliciano (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Puerto Rico; Ed.M., 
Ed.D., Harvard University; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Bruce L. Fields (TEDS) Instructor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Div., 
Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D. cand., Marquette University. 

Earle W. Fike, Jr. (BTS) Adjunct Faculty of 
Ministry Studies 

B.A., L.H.D., Bridgewater College; B.D., 
Th.M., Bethany Theological Seminary; Study: 
Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary/ 
Northwestern University. 



19 



Robert M. Finster (S-WTS) Director of Music and 
Lecturer m Church Music 

B.A., Occidental College; M.Mus., D.M.A., 
Eastman School of Music of the University of 
Rochester. 

Brian J. Fischer (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Systematic Theology 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
S.L.D. cand., University of S. Anselmo, Rome. 

Neal F. Fisher (G-ETS) President and Professor of 
Theology and Society 

A.B., De Pauw University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston 
University Graduate School; Litt.D., De Pauw 
University; S.T.D., MacMurray College. 

Gcraldine A. Flynn (MS) Director of Field 
Education 

M.A., Loyola University; D.Min., University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Liturgy and Music and Director of 
D.Min. Program 

B. A., St. Joseph's College; M.Div., St. Francis 
Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 



Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Liturgy 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; S.L.L., S.L.D., 
Pontifical Liturgical Institute of St. Anselm. 

Nadine Pence Frantz (BTS) Assistant Professor of 
Theology and Ministry Studies 
B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

David J. Frenchak (SCUPE) President 

B.A., Toccoa Falls Bible College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Andover- 
Newton Theological School. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) ProfessorofOld Testament 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Central Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., Midland 
Lutheran College; Study: University of 
Erlangen. 

Gregory A. Galluzzo (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.S., Springhill College; Study: Jesuit School of 
Theology, Berkeley; Jesuit School of Theology, 
Chicago. 



Dorothy FoIIiard, O.P. (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Scripture and Theology 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan; M.A.R.S., University of Chicago. 

Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. 

Allan Forsman (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Ed., C.A.G.S., 
Springfield College; Ph.D., Drew University; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary; 
George Williams College; University of 
Massachusetts. 

Richard Fragomeni (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Liturgy and Preaching 

B.A., Siena College; S.T.B., M.A., University of 
Louvain; M.A., Ph.D., M.Mus. cand., Catholic 
University of America. 



Richard B. Gardner (BTS) Academic Dean and 
Associate Professor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.Theol., University of 
Wurzburg. 

Victoria L. Garvey, R.S.M, (S-WTS) Instructor of 
Old Testament and Biblical Languages 
B.A., Mount Saint Agnes College; M.L.A., The 
Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Ph.D. 
cand.,Vanderbilt University. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) and (CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Thomas L. Gilbert (LSTC) Associate Director, 
Chicago Center for Religion and Science; Adjunct 
Professor of Religion and Science Studies 
B.S., M.S., California Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology. 



120 



Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Professor of 
Theological Anthropology 

M.A. (Anthropology), M.A. (Linguistics), 
Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; Study: 
University of Cambridge. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, University of 
Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
S.T.D., Protestant Theological Institute, Cluj, 
Romania; Study: Polish Academy of Sciences. 

Judith M. Golz (TEDS) Visiting Instructor of 
Psychology and Counseling 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., New York 
University. 

Justo L. Gonzalez (LSTC/MTS) Visiting Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., B.S., Instituto de Marianao; S.T.B., 
Seminario Evangelico de Teologia, Cuba; 
S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study: 
Universidad de La Habana, Universite de 
Strasbourg. 

Stephen Ray Graham (NPTS) Assistant Professor 
of American Church History 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School; Ph.D., The University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Emmanuel F.Y. Grantson (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Biblical Studies 

Licentiate in Theology, University of Ghana- 
Legon; Diploma, Trinity College, Ghana; 
Th.M., Christ Seminary-Seminex/Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; Th.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

James E. Griffiss (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; 
S.T.B., The General Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) President Emeritus 

B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Dennis E. Groh (G-ETS) Professor of the History of 
Christianity (Patristics) 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 



Wayne A. Grudem (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; M.Div., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Cambridge. 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) Associate Professor of Christian 
Ethics and Vice President for Academic Affairs, 
Dean of the Faculty 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., 
Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California, Los Angeles. 

Stanley Hallett (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Dakota Wesleyan College; S.T.D., Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professor of Ministry 
B.A., King College; B.D., Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Lawrence Hamilton (LSTC) Instructor in Old 
Testament 

A.B., Harvard College; M.Div., Trinity 
Lutheran Seminary; Th.D. cand., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. 

YunChun Han (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Old 
Testament 

B.S., Yonsei University, Seoul; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: 
University of Notre Dame. 

Frederic Hang, C.Ss.R. (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching and Communication 
B.A., Holy Redeemer College; M.Div., M.R.E., 
Ml St. Alphonsus Seminary; M.A., Marquette 
University; M.P.S., Loyola University. 

Adolf M. Hansen (G-ETS) Vice President for 
Administration and Associate Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., S.T.M., New 
York Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwest- 
ern University. 

Calvin B. Hanson (TEDS) Director of Internship 
and Field Education 

B.A., Augsburg College; M.A., University of 
Minnesota; Litt.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School. 

James D. Hargleroad (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.S., University of Nebraska; Diploma, 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 



121 



Susan Harlow (M/L) Assistant Professor of Religous 
Education 

B.A., Hollins College; M.Div., Andover 
Newton Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Harvard University; Ed.D., Union Theological 
Seminary. 

James Albert Harrill (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor of New Testament 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Murray J. Harris (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament Exegesis and Theology 
B.A., M.A., University of New Zealand; 
Dip.Th., University of London; Dip. Ed., 
University of Auckland; B.D., University of 
Otago; Ph.D., University of Manchester. 

William P. Haugaard (S-WTS) Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Diocese of Chicago 
Professor of Church History 
B.A., Princeton University; M.Div., Th.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Linda Hawkins (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Thomas Hawkins (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Associate Dean of Doctoral Pro- 
grams for Program Development 
B.A., Eastern Illinois University; M.A., Indiana 
University; M.Div., Christian Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Harvard University; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Illinois. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology and Director ofM.A. Program 
B.A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friedrich- 
Wilhelm University, Bonn; Litt.D., St. 
Bonaventure University; Litt.D., Quincy 
College. 

Warren J. Heard, Jr. (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.S., Southern Methodist University; Dip., 
Moody Bible Institute; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen; Ed.D. cand., Northern Illinois 
University. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology; Director, Chicago Center for Religion 
and Science 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 



Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; L.H.D., Midland 
Lutheran College; Fulbright Scholar at 
University of Tubingen. 

Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor of Reformation History 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., 
Ohio State University; Fulbright Scholar at 
University of Gottingen. 

Lawrence R. Hennessey (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., Holy Trinity Mission Seminary; S.T.B., 
M.A., S.T.L., School of Theology, Catholic 
University of America; M.A., Ph.D., Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences, Catholic 
University of America. 

Carl F. H. Henry (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Th.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Boston 
University; Litt.D., Seattle Pacific College; 
Litt.D., Wheaton College; L.H.D., Houghton 
College. 

Hutz H. Hertzberg (TEDS) Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School; M.A.R., D.Min. cand., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Thomas E. Hickey (MS) Dean of Formation 

M.Div., D.Min. cand., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake; M.Chr. Sp., Creighton University. 

Paul G. Hiebert (TEDS) Professor of Mission and 
Anthropology 

B.A., Tabor College; M.A., Mennonite 
Brethren Biblical Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota. 

John E. Hinkle, Jr. (G-ETS) Professor of Pastoral 
Psychology and Counseling 

B.A., Taylor University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Joint Program with 
Garrett Theological Seminary); Diplomate, 
American Association of Pastoral Counselors. 

David A. Hogue (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology 

B.A., Greenville College; M.S.Ed., Indiana 
State University; M.Div., Christian Theological 



122 



Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University 
(joint program with Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary). 

Paul L. Holmer (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., 
Yale University. 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

A.B., Calvin College; B.D., S.T.M., Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas 
Institute of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

David G. Homer (NPTS) President 

B.A., Barrington College; M.A., University of 
Rhode Island; M.B.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
University. 

Estella Boggs Horning (NBTS) Affiliate Professor 
of Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian-St. 
Luke's Hospital; M.Div., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

David M. Howard, Jr. (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.S., Geneva College; M.A., Wheaton College; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan; Study: Bethel 
Theological Seminary. 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., 
Catholic Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., 
J.C.D., Catholic University of America. 

Kathleen Hughes R.S.C.J. (CTU) Vice President 
and Academic Dean, Professor of Liturgy 
B.A., Newton College; M.A., Catholic 
University of America; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Juan Huitrado, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Cross-Cukural Ministry 
M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union. 



W. Bingham Hunter (TEDS) Academic Dean, 
Senior Vice President of Education 
B.S., M.S., Michigan State University; M.A., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., 
Aberdeen University. 

Reinhard Hutter (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

M.Div. equiv., University of Erlangen; Th.M., 
Duke University; Dr.theol., University of 
Erlangen; Study: University of Bonn. 

Yoshiro lshida (LSTC) Director, Center for Global 
Mission; Lecturer in World Mission 
M.Div. equiv., Japan Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; S.T.M., S.T.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago; Th.D. honoris causa, St. 
Olaf College; Study: Doshisha University, 
Tokyo Union Theological Seminary, Harvard 
University. 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.S., Roosevelt University; M.Ed., Northern 
Illinois University; M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; CPE, Community 
Hospital of Evanston, St. Francis Hospital of 
Evanston; Study: Northern Illinois University. 

Steven R. Janco (MS) Director of Music; Instructor, 
Department of Ministries 

M.Div., S.T.L, University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.C.M., Concordia University, River 
Forest. 

E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Education 
and Ministry and Vice President for Academic 
Affairs 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago; Study: Harvard University; Oxford 
University. 

Theodore W. Jennings (CTS) Prof essor of Theology 
A.B., Duke University; B.D., Ph.D., Emory 
University. 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) Harry R. Kendall Professor 
of New Testament Interpretation 
B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary/University of 
Chicago; Dr. theol., University of Tubingen; 
D.D., Morningside College; D.D., Kalamazoo 
College. 



123 



Susan B. W. Johnson (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Preaching 

B.A., Albright College; M.Div., University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Cynthia Jiirisson (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
American Church History 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther 
Northwestern Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
cand., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Emma J. Justes (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral Care 
and Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Franklin College, Indiana; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; Th.M., Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., Franklin 
College. 

Howard Kang (MTS) Professor of Ministry and 
Director of the Korean- American Ministries 
Center 

A.B., Soonjun University; B.D., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; S.T.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Kenneth S. Kantzer (TEDS) Dean Emeritus and 
Distinguished Professor of Biblical and Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., Ashland College; A.M., Ohio State 
University; B.D., S.T.M., Faith Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

John M. Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Mission Studies and Coordinator of World Mission 
Program 

M.Th., M.Div., Maryknoll School of Theology; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., 
University of St. Michael's College, Toronto. 

Calvin Katter, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical Literature 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., University 
of Chicago. 

Rosemary Skinner Keller (G-ETS) Professor of 
Religion and American Cultural Studies and Dean 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.R.E., Yale 
Divinity School; M.A., Chicago State 
University; Ph.D., University of Illinois at 
Chicago. 



William Kellermann (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., North Central College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Gc-ald F. Kicanas (MS) Rector 

M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.Ed., Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago; 
Study: St. Louis University; Institutes in 
Bethlehem, Israel; Lajolla, California; Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 

Andrew Tukyul Kim (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.Th., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 
Seoul; B.A., Kyungbuk National University, 
Korea; M.R.E., New York Theological 
Seminary; Ed.R.D., Hartford Seminary. 

Dai Kyun Kim (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching and Worship 

B.Th., Th.M., Yonsei University; M.Div., 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Seoul; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) Christ Semmmy-Semmex 
Professor of Old Testament; Dean 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Study: University of Michigan; 
University of Gottingen. 

Haddon Klingberg, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

A.B., M.A., Gordon College; B.D., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Wolf Knappe (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in Hebrew 
Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago; Study: University of Munich; 
University of Gottingen; University of 
Bielefeld. 

Jane K. Koonce (NPTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Spiritual Direction 

B.A, Baylor University; M.A., Columbia 
University Teachers College; M.P.S., Loyola 
University; Study: St. George's College, 
Jerusalem; University of California, Berkeley. 

Carolyn A. Koons (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Azuza Pacific University; M.A., Pasadena 
College; M.A., Talbot Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D. cand., Claremont Graduate 
School. 



124 



Paul Koptak (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Cornmunication and Biblical Interpretation 
A.B., Rutgers University; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University; Study: Regent 
College; Westminster Theological Seminary. 

Edgar M. Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor of New Testament 

B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
M.A., Ph.D., Washington University; Study: 
University of Chicago; American School of 
Classical Studies, Athens; University of 
Tubingen. 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Director, Center for Jewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D.Theol., University of Strasbourg. 

David L. Larsen (TEDS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Trinity College; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

Dennis A. Laskey (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Church History 

B.A., Kutztown State College; M.Div., S.T.M., 
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Philadelphia; Th.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

Spencer Lavan (M/L) Dean and Chief Executive; 
Professor, Comparative and Applied Religion 
B.A., Tufts University; B.D., Harvard Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., McGill University. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (MS) Instructor, 
Adjunct Faculty, New Testament and Early 
Christian Literature 

M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., 
University of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical 
Biblical Institute; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole 
Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Jong Min Lee (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Korean 
Church History 

Th.B., Th.M., Han Kuk Theological Seminary; 
M.Div., Winebrenner Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Sang Bok Lee (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Pastoral 
Care 
B.A., Chorig Shin College, Seoul, Korea; 



M.Div., Ph.D. cand., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary. 

Leo D. Lefebure (MS) Dean of the Canonical 
Faculty and Associate Professor, Department of 
Systematics 

S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.D., 
California Lutheran University; D.D., Pacific 
Lutheran University; D.D., Wittenberg 
University. 

William H. Leslie (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

A.B., Wheaton College; M.Div., Wheaton 
College Graduate School; M.A., Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Walter L. Liefeld (TEDS) Distinguished Professor of 
New Testament 

Th.B., Shelton College; A.M., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Columbia University and 
Union Theological Seminary. 

David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Director of Field 
Education; Professor of World Mission and World 
Religions 

A.B, Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
New Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Erlangen; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; Study: 
University of Munster; University of Michigan. 

Jerome E. Listecki (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
J.C.L., J. CD., S.T.D. cand., Pontifical 



125 



University of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome; J.D., 
DePaul University. 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) Professor of Christian 
Ethics and Dean of Doctoral Programs 
B.A., Smith College; M.A., Columbia 
University/Union Theological Seminary, New 
York; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John G. Lodge (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

John M. Lozano, C.M.R (CTU) Professor of 
Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Claretian College; S.T.L., Universite 
Catholique de l'Ouest, Angers; S.S.L., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Angelicum University, Rome. 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Religious Education and Director of MA.P.S. 
Program and Director of Field Education 
B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 
Mundelein College; M.Div., Catholic Theo- 
logical Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 

Milo D. Lundell (TEDS) Executive Vice President 
of Operations 

B.A., St. Paul Bible College; B.D., D.Min., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Dennis R. Magary (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B. A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Wisconsin. 

Jeffrey Mahan (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology and Media m Popular Culture; 
Associate Director of Field Education 
B.A., The Evergreen State College; M.Div., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Helen Kenik Maine! I i (NBTS) Associate Professor 
of Theological Bibliography 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry 
University; MLIS, University of California, 
Berkeley; Ph.D., St. Louis University. 



Thomas F. Mainor (CTS/MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
m Pastoral Care 

A.B., Davidson College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, Richmond; Study: 
College of William and Mary; University of 
North Carolina Medical School; Eastern Virginia 
Medical School; Old Dominion University. 

Judith G. Mannheim (M/L) Instructor of Religious 
Education and Associate Dean, Independent 
Study Program 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.Div., 
Andover Newton Theological School. 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor Emeritus of Church Music and Artist in 
Residence 

B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; 
M.M., Northwestern University; Fulbright 
Scholar, First Prize in Organ and Improvisation, 
Royal Flemish Conservatory at Antwerp, 
Belgium; Litt.D., Concordia College, Seward; 
D.Mus. (Hon.), Carthage College; L.H.D., 
Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Joseph W. Mariano (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 
B.A., Bloomfield College and Seminary. 

Claude F. Mariottini (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.A., California Baptist College; M.Div., 
Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Study: Graduate Theological Union. 

Robert J. Marshall (LSTC) Senior Fellow, Center 
for Global Mission 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; L.H.D., 
Gettysburg College; LL.D., Augustana College, 
Wagner College, Muhlenberg College, Upsala 
College; D.D., Northwestern Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Waterloo University; 
Litt.D., Roanoke College, Newberry College; 
Study: University of Chicago. 

B. Herbert Martin, Sr. (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Philander Smith College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; L.H.D., 
Monrovia College, West Africa. 

Ralph Martin (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Biblical 
Studies and New Testament 
B.A., M.A., University of Manchester; Ph.D., 
King's College, University of London. 



126 



Howard C. Matson (TEDS) Director of Placement 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., D.Min. cand., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Ellen McClure, O.S.F. (CTU) Dean of Students 
and Community Services 

R.N., St. Francis Hospital School of Nursing, 
Pittsburgh; B.S.N., Marquette University; 
M.A., Providence College; M.S., California 
University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D. cand., 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania. 

Mary Ann McDermott (CTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Health Ministries 

B.S.N. , M.S.N. , Loyola University of Chicago 
School of Nursing; Ed.D., Northern Illinois 
University. 

Barbara Jo McDevitt (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching and Coordinator of Experiential 
Education and Field Studies 

B.S., Bates College; M.A., University of New 
Hampshire; M.Div., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Study: McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

John J. McDonnell (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake. 

Carol Ann McGibbon (SCUPE) Executive Vice- 
President 

B.A., Acadia University; M.Div., Acadia 
Divinity College. 

James P. Mcllhone (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture; Associate 
Academic Dean 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; Ph.D., Marquette University. 

Duncan Mcintosh (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Ministry 

B.Mus.Ed., Houghton College; B.D., Th.M., 
Fuller Theological Seminary; D.Min., Eastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. 

David J. McKay (TEDS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 
Illinois, Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Lois McKinney (TEDS) Professor of Mission 

B.A., Biola University; M.R.E., Denver 



Seminary; Ph.D., Michigan State University; 
Study: Toronto Institute of Linguistics, 
Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); 
Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal); Wheaton 
College Graduate School. 

Scot McKnigfrt (TEDS) Associate Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Grand Rapids Baptist College; M.A., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., 
University of Nottingham. 

Frances C. McWUIiams (CTS/LSTC/MTS/M/L) 
Director of the CPE Program of the Hyde Park 
Cluster; (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Pastoral 
Care 

B.A., Beloit College; M.Div., Yale University 
Divinity School; D.Min., Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 

Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) Director of 
Hispanic Ministry 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.T.S., Jesuit 
School of Theology at Berkeley. 

Charles R. Meyer (MS) Professor Emeritus, 
Departments of Systematic Theology and Church 
History 

M.A., S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
B.S. Library Science, Rosary College; Study: 
Vatican Library; Gregorian University, Rome. 

Kenneth M. Meyer (TEDS) President 

Dip., B.D., Trinity Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Luther Rice University. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.D.(equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Study: 
University of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Western Michigan 
University; Yale University; Pontifical Biblical 
Institute; Loyola University. 

Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore (CTS) Associate 
Professor of Religion, Personality and Culture 
B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Leonel L. Mitchell (S-WTS) Registrar and 
Professor of Liturgies 

B.A., Trinity College; S.T.B., D.D., Berkeley 
Divinity School; S.T.M., Th.D., The General 
Theological Seminary. 



127 



Margaret M. Mitchell (MTS) Associate Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Manhattanville College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Study: Boston College. 

Douglas J. Moo (TEDS) Professor of New Testament 
B.A., DePauw University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Professor of Psychology and 
Religion 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern 
Methodist University; M.Th., Duke University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Diplomate 
Alfred Adler Institute of Chicago; Diplomate, 
C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago. 

Hebron Morris (TEDS) Director of Master of Arts 
in Religion Program, Emphasis in Urban Ministry 
M.A.R./UM, Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School. 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi (NBTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society and Director of Hispanic Studies 
B.S., Institute Politecnico Otto Krause, Buenos 
Aires; L.Soc, Universidad Argentina de 
Ciencias Sociales; B. Teol., Seminario Biblio 
Latinoamericano, San Jose, Costa Rica; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory 
University; Study: Seminario Internacional 
Teologico Bautista, Buenos Aires; Princeton 
University. 

Christopher N. Mount (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
New Testament 

B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A.R., 
Th.M., Westminster Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago Divinity 
School; Study: University of Washington. 

Deborah F. Mullen (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Historical Studies and Associate 
Dean of Masters Programs for Experiential 
Education 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.Div., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School/Bex ley Hall/Crozer 
Theologial Seminary; Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago. 

Paul E. Mundey (BTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Evangelism 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary; Fellow in 
Organizational and Community Systems, Johns 
Hopkins University. 



Larry G. Murphy (G-ETS) Professor of the History 
of Christianity 

B.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

Barbara Kimes Myers (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Christian Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State University; M.S., 
University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois-Champaign. 

Robert K. Myers, Jr. (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Illinois College, Jacksonville; M.Div., 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

William R. Myers (CTS) Academic Dean and 
Professor of Christian Education 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; 
M.Ed., Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President Emeritus 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; L.D.H., Sioux 
Empire College; Ed.D. (Hon.), Judson College; 
Study: Union Theological Seminary; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Study: University of Cambridge. 

Peter T. Nash (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., Concordia Sr. College, Ft. Wayne; M.Div., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

A.B., Brown University; B.D., Yale University 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett Theological Seminary; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary; 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Professor of Ministry 
and Director of Field Education 
B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar, University of Heidelberg. 



128 



Harold A. Netland (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Phibsophy of Religion and Mission 
B.A., Biola College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 

Thomas J. Nettles (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Ph.D., 
South western Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Gary Neville, O.Praem. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Church Law 

B.A., St. Norbert College; M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; B.C.L., M.C.L., Ph.D., 
University of Ottawa; B.C.L., J.C.L., J.C.D., St. 
Paul University, Ottawa. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of 
Preaching 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div, Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar at 
Manchester University. 

Carol M. Noren (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Homiletics 

B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

John W. Nyquist (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of Summer Overseas 
Ministries 

B.A., M.A., California State University; M.A., 
M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Anthony O'Connell, O.S.M. (MS) Instructor, 
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Ministry 
B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A., 
Duquesne University; M.Sc, Trinity College, 
University of Dublin; Psy.D., Chicago School of 
Professional Psychology. 

Theodore M. Olsen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Rockford College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Study: University 
of Iowa. 

Karl A. Olsson (NPTS) President Emeritus 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 
Bibliography 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 



University of Illinois; Study: University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University; Spalding College. 

Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) Assistant 
Professor of Old Testament and Semitic 
Languages 

B.A., Wheaton College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of 
Aberdeen. 

Grant R. Osborne (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard 
University. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.EM. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy and Director of M.Div. Program 
S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome; Study: Harvard 
University; University of California. 

C. David Owens (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Ministry 

B.A., Covenant College; M.Div., Bangor 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Donovan J. Palmquist (LSTC) Lecturer m Ministry 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div, Augustana 
Lutheran Seminary; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin - Milwaukee; D.Min., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; D.D., Carthage 
College. 

Chang Hwan Park (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Hong Ik University; Th.B., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Litt.D., Whitworth 
College. 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of Theology 
and Dean of Masters Programs 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study: 
University of Munich. 



129 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Ethics 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., 
Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of 
Religion; D.D., Hebrew Union College-Jewish 
Institute of Religion, Cincinnati. 

Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Professor of Theology 
and Cross -Cultural Studies 

A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., 
Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield, 
IL; S.T.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 



David Ramage, Jr. (MTS) McCormick Professor of 
Church and Ministry 

B.A., Hanover College; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; D.D., L.L.D., Hanover 
College; D.D., Johnson C. Smith University; 
D.Litt., Alma College; Study: University of 
Cincinnati; School of Social Worle, University 
of Illinois. 

Lallene Rector (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Psychology of Religion and Pastoral Psychotherapy 
B.A., Texas Christian University; M.T.S., Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Jerold F. Reed (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Church Growth and Evangelism 
B.S., University of California, Davis; M.Div., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 



James Persson (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor of 
Ministry 

B.S., Mankato State University; M.Div., North 
Park Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Richard 1. Pervo (S-WTS) Professor of New 
Testament and Patristics 

B.A., Concordia College; B.D., Episcopal 
Theological School; Th.D., Harvard University. 

Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology and Director of Augustus 
Tolton Program 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S.W., 
University of Illinois; M.A., St. John's 
University; Ph.D., Catholic University of 
America. 

Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of 
Hispanic Ministry 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; S.T.D., 
Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca. 

SUas Pinto (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 

B.Th., Presbyterian Independent Theological 
Seminary, Brazil; M.Th., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; D.Min. cand., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Phyllis Rodgerson Pleasants (NBTS) Registrar 
and Assistant Professor of Church History 
B.A., Mary Washington College; M.Ed., 
University of Virginia; M.Div., Ph.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Study: Oxford 
University. 



Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of Theology 

A.B., University of New Hampshire; S.T.B., 
Boston University; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. 

David M. Rhoads (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A, Gettysburg College; M.A., Oxford 
University; B.D., Gettysburg Lutheran 
Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Hispanic Ministry and Doctrinal 
Theology 

B.A., Divine Word College; M.A., DePaul 
University; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de 
Salamanca. 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Church History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study: 
Oxford University. 

Mara Liz Rivera (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.S., Nazareth College of Rochester; M. Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Laura J. Robinson (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., Ph.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 



130 



Jay C. Rochelle (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Worship and Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.M., 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
Chicago Theological Seminary; Study: 
Valparaiso University; Yale University. 

Daniel R. Rodriguez -Diaz (MTS) Professor of 
Church History and Hispanic Ministry 
B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., 
Graduate School of Theology, Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., National University of Mexico. 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC) Associate Director, 
Hispanic Ministries Program and Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A, Universidad de Puerto Rico; M.Div., 
Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Edward Rommen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., Nyack College; M.Div., D.Miss., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Th.D., University 
of Munich. 

Eugene E Roop (BTS) President, Wieand Professor 
of Biblical Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 

Lilian R. Ross (S-WTS) Professor in Christian 
Ministries 
M.R.E, Loyola University. 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History; (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden 
College; M.A. (History), M.A. (Theology), 
Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine 
School of Theology. 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) Frederick Carl Eiselen 
Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 
cand. rev. min., Universities of Marburg, 
Tubingen, Heidelberg; Th.M., Th.D., Victoria 
University /Toronto School of Theology. 

D. Nicholas Rudall (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communication Arts 

B.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Rosemary Radford Ruether (G-ETS) Georgia 
Harkness Professor of Applied Theology 
BA., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 



Graduate School; L.H.D., Denison University; 
Emmanuel College, Boston; Wittenberg 
University; Xavier University; Hamilton 
College; St. OlaPs College; Walsh College; 
Merrimack College; DePauw University; D.D., 
St. Bernard's Institute; University of Edinburgh. 

John H. Sailhamer (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of California, Long Beach; 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., University of Nebraska; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Herman E. Schaalmann (CTS) and (G-ETS) 
Adjunct Faculty Member 

B.A., M.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.H.L., D.D., Hebrew Union College. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
Missions and Church History 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia 
University; International Christian University, 
Japan; Oxford University. 

Daniel S. Schipani (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

Lie. Psy., Universidad de Buenos Aires; Dr. Psy., 
Universidad Catolica Argentina; M.A.R., 
Goshen Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
California at Los Angeles. 

Robert L. Schoenstene (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
S.S.L., Pontifical College Josephinum. 

David M. Scholer (NPTS) Distinguished Professor 
of New Testament and Early Church History 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton 
College Graduate School; B.D., Gordon 
Divinity School; Th.D., Harvard Divinity 
School. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University of 
Nijmegen; Study: Oxford University. 



131 



Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU) Lecturer in Cross 
Cultural Ministry 

L.Miss., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian 
University. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Wanda J. Moody Scoble (NBTS) Adjunct 
Instructor in Christian Education 
B.A., Ottawa University; M.A. (C.E.), 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 



Douglas R. Sharp (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Theology 

B.A., William Jewell College; M.Div., 
American Baptist Seminary of the West; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

Norman Shawchuck (NBTS) Adjunct Professor in 
Ministry 

B.A., Jamestown College; M.Div.; Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

John J. Shea (MS) Program Director, Doctor of 
Ministry Program 
S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 



Martha Scott (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Governors State University; M.Div., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Timothy F. Sedgwick (S-WTS) Professor of Ethics 
and Moral Theology 

A.B., Albion College; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

Charles M. Sell (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Th.M., Th.D., 
Dallas Theological Seminary. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) President and Professor 
of New Testament Studies 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Mark H. Senter, III (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education; Dean of Continuing 
Education 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 
Illinois, Circle Campus; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Jack L. Seymour (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director, Joint Ph.D. Program 
(with Northwestern University) 
B.S., Ball State University; M.Div., D.Min., 
Vanderbilt University Divinity School; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College. 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of 
Ministry 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School; 
D.Min., Pacific School of Religion. 



Mark S. Sisk (S-WTS) Dean and President 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Div., D.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Daniel S. Siwek (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Ministry 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake. 

Kenneth B. Smith, Sr. (CTS) President and 
Associate Professor of Ministry 
B.A., Virginia Union University; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; D.D., Elmhurst 
College; D.P. S., National College of Education. 

Newland E Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Management, Secretary to the Faculty, 
Associate Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate 
Library School, University of Chicago; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary. 

Klyne R. Snodgrass (NPTS) Paul W. Brandel 
Chair in New Testament Studies 
B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews, Scotland. 

Graydon F. Snyder (CTS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: Pontifical 
Institute of Christian Archaeology, Rome; 
Cambridge University. 

Howard A. Snyder (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Ministry 

B.A., Greenville College; M.Div., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 



132 



Woon San Sohn (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology 

B.Th., Methodist Theological Seminary, Seoul; 
M.A., The United Graduate School of 
Theology, Yonsei University; S.T.M., Yale 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Mark Sorvillo (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.Div., 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

James A. Speer (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology, Church and Society 
B.A., Biola College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; M.Phil., Ph.D., Drew 
University Graduate School. 

Colleen D. S tamos (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 
B.A., Indiana University; M.A. in Religion, 
Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago. 

Eleanor J. Stebner (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Church History 

B.A., University of Alberta, Canada; M.A., 
Marquette University; M.Div., Moravian 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary/Northwest- 
ern University. 

William Richard Stegner (G-ETS) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Drew 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Drew 
University. 

K. James Stein (G-ETS) Jubilee Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Westmar College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Westmar 
College. 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) Professor of 
Philosophical Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.D., Virginia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Durham 
University. 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
S.T.L., Catholic University; S.S.L., S.S.D., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. 
Benedict College; D.H.L., Rosary College. 



Gorman G. Sullivan, O. Carm. (MS) Assistant 
Professor, Department of Systematic Theology and 
Associate Director, Doctor of Ministry Program 
M.A., University of Notre Dame; S.T. L., 
D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Karen I. Summers (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Old 
Testament 

B.A., Rosary College; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: Harvard 
University. 

Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Theological Bibliography and Seminary Librarian 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory 
University. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) Adjunct Associate 
Professor for Supervised Ministry and Justice and 
Peace 

B.A., Villanova University; M.A., St. Louis 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

Sarah J. Tanzer (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Judaism and Christian Origins 
A.B., Dickinson College; M.T.S., Harvard 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard University; 
Study: Hebrew University; Oxford University. 

U Kyaw Than (LSTC) Visiting Professor of Ethics 
and World Religions 

B.A., M.A., DD., S.E. Asia Graduate School of 
Theology, Singapore; Study: Graduate School 
(Ecumenical Institute) Bossey, Switzerland. 

Susan B. Thistlethwaite (CTS) Professor of 
Theology and Culture 

B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Richard D. Tholin (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in 
Christian Social Ethics 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Frank A. Thomas (MTS) and (NPTS) Adjunct 
Lecturer in Preaching 

B.A., University of Illinois, Champaign- 
Urbana; M.Div., D.Min., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Northeastern Illinois 
University; D.Min., United Theological 
Seminary, Dayton. 



133 



Sharon G. Thornton (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Pastoral Care & Theology 

B.A., University of Washington; M.Div., Pacific 
School of Religion; Ph.D. cand., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology, Director of Field Education 
and Coordinator of Spiritual Formation 
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Graduate 
Theological Union; Pacific School of Religion; 
University of Edinburgh. 

Ruth A. Tucker (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., LeTourneau College; M.A., Baylor 
University; Ph.D., Northern Illinois University. 

Robert G. Turtle, Jr. (G-ETS) E. Stanley Jones 
Professor of Evangelism 

A.B., Duke University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School of Theology; Ph.D., University 
of Bristol. 

Robert Tuzik (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Systematics 

A.B., Loyola University; M.Div., S.T.L., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Larry Ulrich (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Pastoral 
Care 

B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., University of 
Dubuque Theological Seminary; D.Min., The 
Chicago Theological Seminary; Study: 
Cambridge University; University of 
Edinburgh; World Health Organization; St. 
Christopher's Hospice; Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary. 

Willem Arie VanGemeren (TEDS) Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of Illinois-Chicago; B.D., 
Westminster Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Kenneth L. Vaux (G-ETS) Professor of Theological 
Ethics 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Th., University of 
Hamburg; Study: University of Pittsburgh; 
Edinburgh University; The University of 
Illinois. 



Osvaldo D. Vena (MTS/LSTC) Adjunct Lecturer 
in New Testament 

B.Th., Buenos Aires Bible Institute; M.Div., 
Bethel Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Institute Superior 
Evangelico de Estudios Teologicos. 

Dwight W. Vogel (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Ministry 

B.A., Westmar College; A.M., Boston 
University; B.D., Andover Newton Theological 
School; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Linda Vogel (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.R.E., Andover 
Newton Theological School; Ph.D., University 
of Iowa. 

Harold Vogelaar (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
World Religions 

B.A., Central College; B.D., New Brunswick 
Theological Seminary; M. Phil., Ph.D., 
Columbia University. 

Paul H. Wachdorf (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation and Director of Prayer Formation 
B.S., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.C.Sp., 
Creighton University, Omaha. 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Ethics 

B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Professor of Historical 
Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC/MTS) Instructor in 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., University of New Mexico; M.Div., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Chicago. 

Walter Wangerin, Jr. (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology and Literature 

B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne; 
M.A., Miami University; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex. 



134 



Ted W. Ward (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Mission, Dean of International 
Studies, Director of the Doctor of Education 
Program, Director of the Doctor of Missiology 
Program, G.W. Aldeen Chair of International 
Studies and Mission 

B.Mus.Ed., Wheaton College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Florida. 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) James G. K. McClure 
Professor of Preaching and Worship and Director 
of the ACTS D.Min. in Preaching Program 
B.A., Columbia University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., 
University of Aberdeen. 

Bruce A. Ware (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., Whitworth College; M.Div., Th.M., 
Western Conservative Baptist Seminary; M.A., 
Univesity of Washington; Ph.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Raymond J. Webb (MS) Chairperson and Director, 
Department of Pastoral Internships; Director, 
Newly Ordained Program; Associate Dean of 
Formation 

S.T.B., A.M., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake. 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
A.B., University of Nebraska; B.D., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett Evangelical 
Seminary and Northwestern University. 

Herold D. Weiss (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Southern Mississippi College; M.A., B.D., 
Andrews University; Ph.D., Duke University; 
Study: Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Pontifical Biblical Institute. 

Wayne C. Weld (NPTS) Professor of Missions 

A.B., University of Washington; B.D., M.A., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Vitor Westhelle (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.Th., Faculdade de Teologia da 1ECLB, Sao 
Leopoldo, Brazil; Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. 



Andrew M. Weyermann (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer 
in Preaching 

B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; Study: University of Hamburg; 
Washington University; Union Theological 
Seminary. 

James E. Will (G-ETS) Henry Pfeiffer Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 
University and Union Theological Seminary. 

Douglas E. Wingeier (G-ETS) Professor of 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

Bartholomew S. Winters (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation 
M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Charles L. Winters (S-WTS) Professor in Christian 
Ministries 

A.B., Brown University; M.Div., Virginia 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Union 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., General 
Theological Seminary. 

Richard J. Wojcik (MS) Professor, Department of 
Ministry 

M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.C.G., Pontifical Institute of Sacred 
Music, Rome. 

John D. Woodbridge (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History and the History of Christian Thought 
A.B., Wheaton College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of Toulouse. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Harold Blake Walker 
Professor of Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., M.S., 
Northwestern University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 
University. 

Walter Wright, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Ministry 

B.A., Simpson College; M.Div., Ph.D. Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Charles David Wysong (NPTS) Adjunct Faculty m 
Christian Education 

B.A., Cal State Fullerton; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 



135 



Henry James Young (G-ETS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Tougaloo College; Th.M., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Hartford 
Seminary Foundation. 



Judith Franzke (BTS/NBTS) Technical Services 
Librarian 

B.A., Trinity College; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School; M.A., Northern Illinois 
University. 



Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Distinguished 
Professor of Christian Philosophy and Theology, 
Emeritus 

A.B., Gordon College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
University; Study: University of Heidelberg; 
University of Basel. 

Martin A. Zielinski (MS) Academic Dean and 
Assistant Professor, Department of Church 
History 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America. 



LIBRARIANS 

Henry Baldwin, F. S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., 
George Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate 
Conception Seminary, Mahwah, N.J. 

Mary R. Bischoff (LSTC/MTS) Director of the 
Jesuit'Krauss-McCormick Library; (MTS) 
Associate Professor; (LSTC) Faculty Status 
B.A., University of Missouri; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Illinois; Study: Christ Seminary- 
Seminex; St. Louis University. 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Alva Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program and 
Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; D.Min. cand., Mundelein Seminary of 
the University of St. Mary of the Lake. 



Deborah J. Cocanig (CTU) Cataloger 

B.A., College of St. Francis; M.A.L.S. 
College. 



Rosary 



Jana Fast (BTS/NBTS) Public Services Librarian 
B.A., Roosevelt University; M.A., University 
of Iowa. 



Neil W. Gerdes (M/L and CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago; D.Min, cand., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Loren Hagen (G-ETS/S-WTS) Catalog Librarian, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., M.A., Ph. C, M. Libr., University of 
Washington. 

David K. Himrod (G-ETS/S-WTS) Assistant 
Librarian for Reader Services, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.Th., 
School of Theology at Claremont; Ph.D., 
University of California, Los Angeles. 

Halyna Hrushetsky (BTS/NBTS) Cataloging 
Assistant 

B.A., Northeastern University; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College. 

Tina B. Krause (JKM) Coordinator of the 
Ecumenical Parish Resource Center 
B.A., California Lutheran College. 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (BTS/NBTS) Director of The 
Seminary Library, BTS/NBTS, and Associate 
Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry 
University; MLIS, University of California, 
Berkeley; Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, Study: University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University; Spalding College. 

Emilie G. Pulver (JKM) Head of Technical Services 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.L.S.; 
University of Chicago. 

Janet Russell (JKM) Reference Librarian 

B.A., Reed College; M.A. in Teaching, M.A. in 
Library Science, University of Chicago. 



136 



Kenneth Sawyer (JKM) Head of Public Services 

B.A., University of Nebraska, at Lincoln; M.A. 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., 
University of Chicago Graduate Library School; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Management, The United Library, 
G'ETS/S-WTS, and Associate Professor of 
Bibliography 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate Library 
School, University of Chicago; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Michael L. Stone (CTU) Librarian 

A.B., Harvard College; LL.B., Harvard Law 
School; LL.M., Boston University Law School; 
M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 



John W. Thompson (G-ETS/S-WTS) Head of 
Bibliographic Control, The United Library, 
G'ETS/S-WTS 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., University of 
Chicago; M.A., Graduate Library School, 
University of Chicago. 

Stase Vaskelis (JKM) Serials Librarian 

Research Librarian, Vilnius University, 
Lithuania. 

Keith P. Wells (TEDS) Reference Librarian 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.L.S., University 
of Pittsburgh. 



Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Seminary Librarian and 
Associate Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory 
University. 



137 



LOCATIONS OF ACTS SCHOOLS 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS TO GET TO EACH AREA OF THE MAP: 

1. To MS: MS is located in Mundelein, forty miles northwest of downtown Chicago, and may 
be reached by car via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 176 exit, 176 west to 
Mundelein. MS is located on the north side of 176. 

2. To TEDS: TEDS is located in the northwest suburb of Deerfield and may be reached by car 
via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 22 exit. TEDS is immediately to the east of 
the expressway off Route 22. 

3. To G-ETS and S-WTS: G-ETS and S-WTS are located respectively on the east and west 
sides of Sheridan Road on the Northwestern University campus in Evanston. They may be 
reached either by car via the Lake Shore Drive (North) to Sheridan Road or by public transporta- 
tion with the CTA elevated train to the Noyes Street station. 

4. To NPTS: NPTS is located on the far north side of Chicago and may be reached by car via 
the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore Drive (North) or the 
Kennedy Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transportation with CTA elevated Howard train to 
the Berwyn Street station and connecting bus or the Ravenswood line to Kimball Street station. 

5. To BTS and NBTS: BTS and NBTS are located on adjacent campuses in west-suburban 
Oak Brook and Lombard, and may be reached by car via the East- West Tollway (1-88), Highland 
Avenue north to Butterfield Road (Route 56), Butterfield Road east. NBTS is north of Butterfield 
Road just west of BTS, which is located in the northwest corner of the intersection of Butterfield 
and Meyers Roads. 

6. To CTU, CTS, LSTC, M/L and MTS: All five schools are located in close proximity to 
one another in the Hyde Park area of Chicago near the University of Chicago. They may be 
reached by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore Drive 
(South) or the Dan Ryan Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transportation either with the CTA 
elevated train or IC (Illinois Central) to the respective 55th Street stations and connecting buses. 



140 



Legend: 

BTS 

CTU 

CTS 

G-ETS 

LSTC 

MTS 

M/L 

MS 

NPTS 

NBTS 

S-WTS 

TEDS 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville Lombard Theological School 
Mundelein Seminary 
North Park Theological Seminary 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School